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View Full Version : pros and cons of a heavier, smaller head raquet?


andry16
02-16-2012, 07:19 PM
could you help me out? i play with blx surge wich is 290gr strung and 100inch head size and yesterday i got to hold a dunlop which was 337gr and 95 inch headsize and i was wondering what would be the diferences if i switch to the dunlop one and btw i felt way more maneuvrable than my blx

kengan
02-16-2012, 07:45 PM
Heavier rackets can absorb more force from the ball. An analogy that stuck for me was the hammering of a nail. Smaller head size gives less pop but more control.

Larrysümmers
02-16-2012, 08:15 PM
pros,more controlled power

Hi I'm Ray
02-17-2012, 05:18 AM
pros,more controlled power

That almost sounds like you are saying more control AND more power. If that were true then we could also say 60sq in frames also offer more controlled power.

I'd say its more like small head size = less power, more control.

OP: Added weight increases stability. Added weight can increase power but there are some factors to consider. I'll let one of the many posters who love talking about that stuff to get into the specifics.
Usually the smaller head/heavier rackets have better feel as well.

With lighter frames, ppl will say you can swing them faster and get more spin, thus you are getting power and controlling it with spin.

I have and use both lighter/larger headsize frames and heavier/smaller headsize frame, and both are good in their own ways.

Generally, I find that an increase in racket head size increases power a lot, more than increases in weight. For example the Pure Drive GT 107 @ 10.4oz, sw 313, stiffness 69, felt noticeably more powerful than my APDGT, 100sq in, 11.6oz (customized) sw around 335, stiffness 70.

TimothyO
02-17-2012, 05:27 AM
More control and the power comes from a different source.

The control comes from better stability on impact. Your frame won't get pushed around as much on contact. A smaller head also provides more control too.

The power of a heavy frame comed from the mass. A frame can derive power from stiffness, stringbed characteristics, or mass. Of these mass provides the greatest control oriented power followed by stiffness while SB power (extreme example big, open, and soft string) is usually the least control oriented.

You can balance all three through various choices. For example, I enjoy the comfort of gut mains but tame them with stiff poly crosses and a soft frame. To boost power and stability I add some lead for greater mass.

A frame and string is like a machine and even though it may appear static it actually does have moving parts! :)

fuzz nation
02-17-2012, 07:15 AM
could you help me out? i play with blx surge wich is 290gr strung and 100inch head size and yesterday i got to hold a dunlop which was 337gr and 95 inch headsize and i was wondering what would be the diferences if i switch to the dunlop one and btw i felt way more maneuvrable than my blx

It could be the case that the Dunlop you tried out had significantly more head-light (HL) balance than your BLX. That extra HL balance can make a rather hefty racquet much easier to handle - it depends on what you want in a racquet. If you like to play with more of a middle-weight frame, that racquet might be more stable with only a little HL balance. The potential downside might be that it's a little slower in the maneuvering department for blocked shots, volleys, etc. without "enough" HL balance.

What other comparisons can you make between your BLX and the Dunlop?

PrinceMoron
02-17-2012, 07:46 AM
You will never be able to change back to a larger size, the smaller you go, the more like a frying pan 98/100s will become to you.

tennis_pr0
02-17-2012, 07:46 AM
Heavier rackets can absorb more force from the ball. An analogy that stuck for me was the hammering of a nail. Smaller head size gives less pop but more control.

Correct. Also more rewarding hit when timed and hit well.

andry16
02-17-2012, 03:57 PM
well the other differences i noticed where that the dunlop didnt feel as heavy as the listed weight whereas my blx felt heavier than its current weight, but maybe that has to do with the HL balance, my blx is 4 pts HL and the dunlop is 7pts HL.

another big thing i noticed is that i felt the dunlop "thinner" i dont know how to explain it but i just felt it that way.

and no i did not hit with the dunlop i just got to hold it for a couple of moments and swing it before a started my regular training with my blx

dont get me wrong i really love my blx and it kind of "understands" my game (yes im talking about the raquet), its like it just makes the ball land in in the lines every time i want to and whenever on the court i want to.

the only thing that got me thinking about a possible switch is that im getting stronger and better every day and i think that my beloved blx wont be able to live to the competition in these advanced levels being such a light and stiff raquet

Harry_Wild
02-18-2012, 12:37 AM
Heavier small size racket is better for control. Plus, you can do thinks like drop shots; placement of volleys faster; better because it moves faster in the air less resistance. More accurate in serving too!

Also, you can control hard shots against you much better since the racket is heavier and you of course can put more muscle back into the return too!

All in all; you have "control" which is the most important to a player!

Chyeaah
02-18-2012, 02:00 AM
Heavier small size racket is better for control. Plus, you can do thinks like drop shots; placement of volleys faster; better because it moves faster in the air less resistance. More accurate in serving too!

Also, you can control hard shots against you much better since the racket is heavier and you of course can put more muscle back into the return too!

All in all; you have "control" which is the most important to a player!

Except a Power Player who likes to bash the ball straight back down the T or at your body to jam you.

Chyeaah
02-18-2012, 02:07 AM
That almost sounds like you are saying more control AND more power. If that were true then we could also say 60sq in frames also offer more controlled power.

I'd say its more like small head size = less power, more control.

OP: Added weight increases stability. Added weight can increase power but there are some factors to consider. I'll let one of the many posters who love talking about that stuff to get into the specifics.
Usually the smaller head/heavier rackets have better feel as well.

With lighter frames, ppl will say you can swing them faster and get more spin, thus you are getting power and controlling it with spin.

I have and use both lighter/larger headsize frames and heavier/smaller headsize frame, and both are good in their own ways.

Generally, I find that an increase in racket head size increases power a lot, more than increases in weight. For example the Pure Drive GT 107 @ 10.4oz, sw 313, stiffness 69, felt noticeably more powerful than my APDGT, 100sq in, 11.6oz (customized) sw around 335, stiffness 70.

Thats why you string higher in bigger frames.

@Everyone Are you measuring the increase of power by

A) Lack of Control
B) How deep the ball goes into the court
C) How fast the ball is/comes off the racquet
D) Less spin to tame the power

Because sometimes when people say "increased" power they say it because they experience one of them and the responses aren't in sync, so thats why i don't really trust many reviews. imho increased power is really hard to rate, usually in oversized racquets its a lack of control and less spin, but it still might have the same power. I usually judge increased power how hard the ball is coming off the racquet but that still changes because of spin etc.

bc-05
02-18-2012, 04:28 AM
funny question this.. and i still dont even know the answer.. my first ever racquet is a prince original graphite oversize.. i used it while i was growing up and loved it very much (for me its the lightest frame i've ever played with)

then.. my brother started with a smaller head racquet (he was playing with a ps 85 at the time).. but at that time he used to always made fun of me as the only reason i win is because the frame that i used to hit with is much bigger than his... so at the time i was looking for racquet with one of the smallest sweetspot, and found a pc600.. the reason is that i thought to myself if i start playing with a racquet with a small sweetspot, i will always be able to play much better with a bigger one..

we fast forward 15 years or so now.. i still use my pc600 in fact headed up to 400 grams.. eventhough im still a fan of big head racquets and light racquets.. for some reason my perfomance is much better using the small heavy racquets.. in fact i was testing one of the radar @ melbourne park tennis court..

and i was trying to find the difference in power of the 2 racquets.. my fastest with my pc600 was 207kph going inside the service line.. where as my fastest with the pog 107 was only 192kph.. that's if we're talking about serves that are going in.. if i was talking about hitting it as hard as i could.. i'd say i'd get about the same speed (in fact i could still say on average the pc600 as i am so used to the feel of the racquet that i know which spot of the racquet would give me the best speed)

Harry_Wild
02-18-2012, 06:40 PM
Except a Power Player who likes to bash the ball straight back down the T or at your body to jam you.

That is where the heavier racket is the best; when you are faced with a hard serve; you just block it back if you can and the ball should return with enough pace so it not a setup shot for the server to finish the point off. That is if you can get it back on the strings and not the frame!

DeShaun
02-18-2012, 08:46 PM
Cons:
Weight could make you late on certain of your shots
Due to smaller sweet spot, can seem lacking in one-shot kill put-away power until you finally dial in your best string type and tension
No cheap power
Exposes your technique

Pros:
Exposes your technique
Better for control (frozen ropes)
Arguably more enjoyable sensation on impact with sweet spot
Allows/forces you to swing through all you shots

Chyeaah
02-18-2012, 08:57 PM
Cons:
Weight could make you late on certain of your shots
Due to smaller sweet spot, can seem lacking in one-shot kill put-away power until you finally dial in your best string type and tension
No cheap power
Exposes your technique

Pros:
Exposes your technique
Better for control (frozen ropes)
Arguably more enjoyable sensation on impact with sweet spot
Allows/forces you to swing through all you shots

Weight is not a con.

It is a Middle. Lighter weight can make you swing too fast and heavier too slow. So Weight is a con for both light and heavy but also a pro, depends on the player.

I agree with no cheap power, thats the main concern, you can't do a half hearted swing or else it will have NO spin.

stormholloway
02-18-2012, 08:58 PM
Nothing feels better than honing your technique with a heavy mid size racquet. It's a rewarding, yet sometimes frustrating, experience.

If you're into tennis for the joy of it, I don't see any reason to bother with anything but the 90s.

DeShaun
02-18-2012, 09:04 PM
Weight is not a con.

It is a Middle. Lighter weight can make you swing too fast and heavier too slow. So Weight is a con for both light and heavy but also a pro, depends on the player.

I agree with no cheap power, thats the main concern, you can't do a half hearted swing or else it will have NO spin.

It can be a con if you're being rushed on your weakest rally stroke. With lighter/bigger frames you can punch replies, when you're off-balance or stretched, say, in a manner that you simply wouldn't be able to duplicate as often with smaller/heavier frames.

I did not claim that weight was a con intrinsically, only that it can "make you late on certain of your shots."

Chyeaah
02-18-2012, 09:36 PM
It can be a con if you're being rushed on your weakest rally stroke. With lighter/bigger frames you can punch replies, when you're off-balance or stretched, say, in a manner that you simply wouldn't be able to duplicate as often with smaller/heavier frames.

I did not claim that weight was a con intrinsically, only that it can "make you late on certain of your shots."

When i play with a APD i always air swing on my winners xD, it just swings noticeably faster than my leaded up 100S.

Smaller headsizes swing faster so maybe it will cancel out the sluggishness? Idk. With the current progression in 20 years there will be strings that make your spin 5 times more, or they will be playing with OS frames instead of 100sqin.

We just need a new federer using a 110 sq in racquet and changes will be made.

Xizel
02-18-2012, 10:06 PM
Pros:
Line clipping shots become routine

Cons:
You get hooked more
You swing your shoulder out of your socket and the ball barely seem fast

I swapped my leaded nTour 95 for an APD with another guy the other day, and he asked, "How hard do I have to hit to get the ball over?" I giggled. It helps to have a string bed with a lot of power potential. Poly is not the way to go in cold weather.