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View Full Version : Why are the best sticks always from 10+ years ago?


richsox
03-07-2012, 12:38 PM
It seems quite amazing on the number of posts I see that many will rave on about this stick or that stick, for example to Prince POG, Wilson KPS88, Babolat Pure Control/Pure Drive Swirly, amongst many others as the best ever rackets for control or feel, power, whatever, etc.

Also many of the Pro's still use the molds of various so-called classics made all these years ago, and have modern racket paintjobs.

So my question is: Will we all in 10 + years time look back on the sticks of today and rave on how they were the best ever?

Just maybe many of us are too harsh and critical of today's rackets, and they too will prove to be the sticks we reminisce about in the future -- just a thought

blipblop
03-07-2012, 12:48 PM
It seems quite amazing on the number of posts I see that many will rave on about this stick or that stick, for example to Prince POG, Wilson KPS88, Babolat Pure Control/Pure Drive Swirly, amongst many others as the best ever rackets for control or feel, power, whatever, etc.

Also many of the Pro's still use the molds of various so-called classics made all these years ago, and have modern racket paintjobs.

So my question is: Will we all in 10 + years time look back on the sticks of today and rave on how they were the best ever?

Just maybe many of us are too harsh and critical of today's rackets, and they too will prove to be the sticks we reminisce about in the future -- just a thought

Don't forget the SRD Tour 90/95!

But more seriously, I was just pondering this phenomenon. In some cases, you have pretty recognizable "instant classics," so to speak. For example, I think the K90 will go down in the books as a great, as is evidenced by its demand and reviews. But more often than not the fact that a racket stands the test of time is part of what makes it a classic.

Overall I think that yes, some (not all) of the rackets in current production will be considered the best ever in 10 years. Yonex RDS 002 Tours, Pure Drive GTs, Wilson BLX Blades, etc. will be highly sought after.

As time goes on, rackets companies make many bad rackets, and a few good ones. As conusmers all we can do is find the good ones and stock up. :)

cknobman
03-07-2012, 01:05 PM
Cause your old.

Its a fact that the older you get the more resistant you are to change. Its just the way the human mind ages.

dnj30
03-07-2012, 01:15 PM
The fact is racket technology hasnt really changed significantly since the advent of larger graphite frames, and that was over 20yrs ago. Most of the so-called improvements you see now are just extremely minor tweeks that the racket companies over sell to the public. Most experts(who aren't trying to sell you a new racket) will tell you that the real revolution that gave birth to "the modern game" was polyester strings.
There are many paralells in the golf club industry. Since the equipment in both golf and tennis dont really wear out, you have to invent a reason for people to replace their rackets/clubs. So you release a new model with some new "technology", and a shiny new paint job. And all of us suckers line up to buy it. $400 is much better spent on a few lessons than on 2 of the newest model racket.
I'd love to write more, but the new IG prestiges just came in and i have to go buy 3 of them.

Say Chi Sin Lo
03-07-2012, 01:19 PM
It comes down to what you grew up with and what you're most comfortable with.

VGP
03-07-2012, 01:34 PM
It comes down to what you grew up with and what you're most comfortable with.

It's a generational thing and the pros are no different, and yes, they do influence the buying public.

interjim
03-07-2012, 01:46 PM
When you reach the point where your best playing days were 10 years ago, that's when you'll be able to pinpoint what was, undoubtedly, one of the finest frames ever made.

Deuces Wild
03-07-2012, 01:50 PM
When you reach the point where your best playing days were 10 years ago, that's when you'll be able to pinpoint what was, undoubtedly, one of the finest frames ever made.

Bingo, we have a winner.

Say Chi Sin Lo
03-07-2012, 01:53 PM
It's a generational thing and the pros are no different, and yes, they do influence the buying public.

The pros' "apparent" certainly do influence the buying public. But I'll have to be thoroughly convinced to switch to a say, Babolat Pure Drive line or the Aero Pro line. With their big head size and thicker beam, they just swing awkward.

courtking
03-07-2012, 02:24 PM
graphite.. graphite & graphite.. old stick has more graphite.. many today stick has cheap composite graphite/plastic in it.. it is stiff and injure yourself more often than the old sticks..

CHOcobo
03-07-2012, 02:26 PM
just wait 10 years then yours will be the best too.

cork_screw
03-07-2012, 02:39 PM
A couple of things. I don't think it's an exact time frame that it is always a 10 year mark. The pro staff 85 came out in the 80's. And the POG came out roughly the same time if not in the 90's and so did the pro tours and the prestige classics a little before that. I don't think these racquets are the "best" because if they were everybody would still be using them. There are quite a few people who still use them, but a lot of others have moved on and if they were the best, then they would still be in used today. What I think is that most people just have a nostalgia for them because that's what they grew up playing with. And that's probably where your 10 year reference comes from. Just like when I was a kid I really like certain movies and television shows that I probably wouldn't watch today, but growing up with it, it does bring back some fond memories. There are a lot of racquets out on the market now that I think are better than some of the old classics. I think they fit more of a modern game and make it easier for people to play longer. There are a few racquets that I would definitely prefer over others, but there's enough frames available now that I could hit with that I would feel more comfortable than hitting with some of the old ones. I think recently they really played around with the specs and have fine tuned the production aspect of it. People who complain that their racquets are a gram or two off didn't see how much off the st. vincents were from each other. And the weight of some of the old sticks would give me wrist and shoulder problems if I tried to hit them today. The racquets today I think are much easier on the body. The POG to me was a killer on my wrist.

6-2/6-4/6-0
03-07-2012, 05:09 PM
I'll throw out a theory - 20 years ago it was enough to manufacture a racket well and to simply be using carbon and fiberglass. Now the focus is on paintjobs, marketing, cheap Chinese production, and the latest gimmick that makes you buy a new racket when you just bought one a year ago. It's the reason that people think Head Pro-Stock rackets are a lot better than the production Head rackets.

Choose good materials, use them well, skip the nonsense. That would be my suggestions to racket makers, but that leaves them essentially making what they were making 20 years ago, just with new paintjobs, string patterns and grommet/bumper designs. It's kinda like leather grips, tournagrip, etc. - new doesn't necessarily mean better, it just means new.

Of course I still use Gut strings, so what do I know...

chrisl
03-07-2012, 10:22 PM
So my question is: Will we all in 10 + years time look back on the sticks of today and rave on how they were the best ever?


Yes. "The older I get, the better I used to be"

anirut
03-08-2012, 05:07 AM
I'll throw out a theory - 20 years ago it was enough to manufacture a racket well and to simply be using carbon and fiberglass. Now the focus is on paintjobs, marketing, cheap Chinese production, and the latest gimmick that makes you buy a new racket when you just bought one a year ago. It's the reason that people think Head Pro-Stock rackets are a lot better than the production Head rackets.

Choose good materials, use them well, skip the nonsense. That would be my suggestions to racket makers, but that leaves them essentially making what they were making 20 years ago, just with new paintjobs, string patterns and grommet/bumper designs. It's kinda like leather grips, tournagrip, etc. - new doesn't necessarily mean better, it just means new.

Of course I still use Gut strings, so what do I know...

We have those today in PK Redondo, PK Black Ace and Gamma 340X. There may be more but I don't remember.

Sreeram
03-08-2012, 06:14 AM
one reason why Pros still use older models is because the new models have some kind of Technology in it like eg Cortex which takes away feel or technologies like ytek that adds something to it. They do not want a racquet that softens the matrial on softer drop shots (assuming that the technology works) as they already trained to play dropshot with softer arm. Pros do not want such extra stuffs in their racquet as they have all the stuffs in their game. So they just want the racquet to reflect plainly what they put. That is why plain graphite radicals, prestige etc are famous with them.

Power Player
03-08-2012, 06:16 AM
There will be people missing the Pure Drive with Cortex 2009 version in 10 years.

Just how it is.

And in tennis you really become attached to a gear setup if it is working well for you.

And Sreeram, you went way too far in your assessment.

Most Babolat pros use the current retail cortex models, and only a few like Nadal and Roddick do not.

OTMPut
03-08-2012, 06:36 AM
I don't think these racquets are the "best" because if they were everybody would still be using them.

Usage # has little to do with being "best" (unless, tautologically, you define best in terms of usage).

OTMPut
03-08-2012, 06:38 AM
There will be people missing the Pure Drive with Cortex 2009 version in 10 years.

Just how it is.



Did anyone ever miss a woodie?
Do you miss working on a mainframe with punched cards?

netguy
03-08-2012, 06:39 AM
Human mind tends to put its attention to the advantages of the old situation and the disavantages of the new situation. When one buy a new racquet the mind goes back to the advantages of the old racquet and focus on the desadvantages of the a new one. If one switches back to the old racquet, a new cycle starts. The same happens with goldfriends...the difference is racquets don't complain. :)

Sreeram
03-08-2012, 06:49 AM
And Sreeram, you went way too far in your assessment.

Most Babolat pros use the current retail cortex models, and only a few like Nadal and Roddick do not.

This is something that a pro told me. He actually referred to Utek, I extended it to cortex. Again there might be some pros playing actually with youtek.

ryushen21
03-08-2012, 06:54 AM
I think, to an extent that it comes down to simplicity. Today's racquets are more focused on tech and new materials (at least from a marketing standpoint) to try to make them standout than their actual playability and quality.

Everyone is trying to make frames that sound better and look better rather than actual being better and being designed to the wants/needs of the average player.

I will say that I think that Babolat is an exception to this. They seem to understand pretty well that most players want a racquet that is forgiving and easy to use for a wide range of players. That is why I would say that the APD and PD are modern classics and will likely continue to be.

Power Player
03-08-2012, 06:58 AM
Did anyone ever miss a woodie?
Do you miss working on a mainframe with punched cards?

Actually on here people post that they do miss woodies. And that is not a great example since the posts here clearly allude to sticks made in the graphite era.

This is something that a pro told me. He actually referred to Utek, I extended it to cortex. Again there might be some pros playing actually with youtek.

It's Youtek, and I owned youtek pro mold frames made by Head. They all have the exact same materials as the retail, just different layups. And that includes youtek technology.

The only frames your pro is referring to are the PT57s and those are not really given to pros outside the top 50, so I can safely say most pros are using youtek, cortex..etc.

sureshs
03-08-2012, 08:36 AM
I am using a PS85 these days. Bought 4 of them from TW. Using two, and stored the other 2 for the distant future.

Say Chi Sin Lo
03-08-2012, 08:52 AM
I am using a PS85 these days. Bought 4 of them from TW. Using two, and stored the other 2 for the distant future.

Or you can cycle through 4 of them like I am with my BLX90, to minimize the stress of stringing on the individual frames :).

Limpinhitter
03-08-2012, 09:40 AM
Did anyone ever miss a woodie?
Do you miss working on a mainframe with punched cards?

Yes and yes!

Limpinhitter
03-08-2012, 09:42 AM
I am using a PS85 these days. Bought 4 of them from TW. Using two, and stored the other 2 for the distant future.

Ah, that explains your posts in the "tennis tips" area! Let me introduce you to Mr. Lat, first name, Babo.

sureshs
03-08-2012, 01:28 PM
Ah, that explains your posts in the "tennis tips" area! Let me introduce you to Mr. Lat, first name, Babo.

I have gone heavier, lighter and heavier again.

Babs was too stiff for me.

jamauss
03-08-2012, 01:40 PM
Prestige Mid. Classic stick that has a few revisions that all play beautifully. Just take your pick from whichever generation you liked the most and enjoy. For me it's still currently the Microgel but I'm looking forward to trying out the IG Speed as well.

LeeD
03-08-2012, 01:51 PM
Take a couple of years to decide which was a good racket.
Takes a year more to talk and communicate with other players.
Now you know which racket is good. Add a few more players. Add more time.
4 years go by before you can declare a "classic".
Who listens the first year?