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View Full Version : Tips for long term proficiency


Wikky
03-09-2012, 07:24 PM
I was hoping I could get some tips from some of the more experience stringers on here who are doing a couple thousand racquets a year. I got an intership to a Shop in Alabama this summer where I'm pretty sure I'll be stringing somewhere in the neighborhood of 15-25 racquets a day. This really isn't a problem for me, I can average around 18 minutes a racquet when i need to and 23 is my usual just cruising speed. However I've only done 20ish racquet days 3 times in my short 3 year stringing career.

I was hoping to get some tips for surviving the grind, such as what you guys might do to make yourself more comfortable when stringing and some short cuts outside of actually stringing the racquet I can take.

I don't want to get completely burnt out this summer since this is a huge passion of mine so any advice would be appreciated.

zapvor
03-10-2012, 09:46 PM
if you are at 23min already i think you are better than 90% of us here. do you go to ferris?

dancraig
03-10-2012, 10:16 PM
Get a cushy mat to stand on.
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=414185

Wikky
03-10-2012, 10:21 PM
haha speed wise yes experience wise absolutely not, I just have good hands probably. Yes I do go to Ferris, I've been very fortunate to learn from a lot of other good stringers such as Dave Bone, Scott Nilsen, and Upperclassmen in the program.

Perhaps I wasn't specific enough with my question. Are there any extra tools or equipment I should pick up? Also I've heard a lot of fulltime stringers complain about their feet hurting after standing in one spot for to long so any shoes you guys might recommend. I know they might sound like simple questions but I want to be prepared as possible.

Wikky
03-10-2012, 10:23 PM
thanks craig I do remember the stringers I saw had 2-3 mats they were standing on. I think one of those Prince Beast ones would be pretty sweet.

coachrick
03-11-2012, 09:05 AM
Depending on the flooring surface, a mat can make a world of difference. You definitely want some insulation(thermal and shock) between your feet and a concrete surface. Really good shoes can make a difference, also. Ever notice the foot rail at the bottom of a bar in a restaurant? Great for moving your feet and using different postures and positions for your feet/legs. All you have to do is string at a tavern! Actually, propping one foot up slightly benefits the back and knees and promotes better circulation. Switch positions periodically by 'leaning' one foot on the leg of the machine(or some other platform a few inches off the floor) and/or rocking your feet with calf stretches or toe-lifts from time to time.

Much of the fatigue is mental. Conversation with customers or other stringers 'should' be more stimulating than burying yourself in music or 'words on tape'...YMMV depending on the surroundings. You want to avoid interruptions and distractions that could affect your concentration; but stringing in a vacuum can be mind-numbing!

BTW...no offense to Alabamans; but a shop that brings in summer help to string 25 sticks daily reminds me of some of the very busy shops in Atlanta.(or will you be the only stringer?) That's putting out some serious work on a daily basis! I always shot for 10-12 rackets a day and taught for a few hours to keep from going stir-crazy! One can stay in 'tournament' mode for only so long! ;)

Also, only if you absolutely trust 'someone' to inspect the rackets and remove the strings, you can save some time by having the bare frame at the ready. I never 'really' got comfortable with that, as I prefer to inspect the previous string job myself(especially if there was a catastrophic failure that necessitated the restringing). It 'can' be done if there might be a shop person who can 'prep' the frames for you. BIG YMMV on that one ;) .
Best of luck in your summer endeavor!

zapvor
03-11-2012, 12:19 PM
i am not a big fan of prepping than passing it off to a stringer unless its necessary. but that is a practice being used, so something to consider

Wikky
03-11-2012, 06:10 PM
Thanks for the advice. I'm not 100% sure of my full responsibilities yet but it sounded like I would be doing A LOT of stringing. I like the advice of looking at customers racquets before the strings are cut out to identify the break or problem the customer has with the tension/strings. I'll have to ask how the shop is run next time I talk to my employer.

Steve Huff
03-11-2012, 10:12 PM
1) Learn to push the string through when weaving. I loop & pull, but the fastest stringers I've seen all push.

2) Learn the string lengths you need for specific frames. 1 extra racket per reel adds up over time, plus, the right amount of string increases your speed.

3) Keep your equipment clean and buy new clamps before they start slipping. I use a different set of clamps for poly than I do for all the others. Poly, after a while, will put grooves in your clamps.

4) Be careful about getting injuries. One of the stringers I know at another club had to have carpel tunnel surgery on both wrists due to stringing so much. I know time is money, but time off isn't. Stay healthy. Stay hydrated.

5) Know your products. Anyone can learn to string a racket. Learn your customers and products. Learn what helps particular players play better. Matching string setups/rackets/players to maximize performance is what makes a good stringer.

Wikky
03-12-2012, 01:10 AM
1) Learn to push the string through when weaving. I loop & pull, but the fastest stringers I've seen all push.

2) Learn the string lengths you need for specific frames. 1 extra racket per reel adds up over time, plus, the right amount of string increases your speed.

3) Keep your equipment clean and buy new clamps before they start slipping. I use a different set of clamps for poly than I do for all the others. Poly, after a while, will put grooves in your clamps.

4) Be careful about getting injuries. One of the stringers I know at another club had to have carpel tunnel surgery on both wrists due to stringing so much. I know time is money, but time off isn't. Stay healthy. Stay hydrated.

5) Know your products. Anyone can learn to string a racket. Learn your customers and products. Learn what helps particular players play better. Matching string setups/rackets/players to maximize performance is what makes a good stringer.

I will take and appreciate every piece of advice 2-5. Loop and pull for life, and I think its a little late to change my stringing technique anyways. Thanks a lot though Steve. I really hope I don't have to worry about carpel tunnel at 20 though.... that would be embarrassing.

mchjhn
03-12-2012, 10:26 AM
1) Learn to push the string through when weaving. I loop & pull, but the fastest stringers I've seen all push.

I cannot agree any more on this point. I started as a loop and pull, did my weaves this way for 8 yrs just stringing for myself, and friends. Started string for others, and had many racquets, it took a month to learn to push the weave, dropped 10 minutes off my time. took another month to learn how to push poly.

Force yourself to do it, go slow in the beginning, and you will be off to the races in no time, especially if you are doing 15-25 racquets a day. that's alot of frames to loop and pull.