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View Full Version : Switching to Prince Diablo Mid


zzain
03-11-2012, 08:50 PM
Hey..I'm a beginner (2.0 - 2.5ish) and I've hit with a beginners' racket so far (Wilson Federer 110). My coach encouraged me to experience hitting with a pro racket. So I hit with his Prince Diablo Mid. The smaller head size wasn't the problem. It felt a little heavy but I'm pretty sure I can adjust to the weight. The real problem is that it was much powerful than my beginner's racket. I don't have to complete my swing to get the ball across. I'm worried that if I switch, I won't be able to develop my shots. What do you guys think?

eagle
03-11-2012, 11:13 PM
Aloha zzain,

I hate to say it but in most cases, it is not the racquet. It is the person who wields it who needs the work.

Learn and master the fundamentals. After you do, then you can move up to a tweener racquet. Besides, a player's racquet like the Tour Diablo is far too advanced for you at this time.

Good luck and have fun. You'll get there.

Mahalo,
eagle

Tennis in Hawaii: http://www.tennisinhawaii.com
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sansaephanh
03-11-2012, 11:16 PM
dont forget fuzzy yellow balls!

zzain
03-12-2012, 05:29 PM
thanks guys

thug the bunny
03-13-2012, 05:39 AM
The power you feel comes from the weight, and if you don't think the weight is too much for you (you should make that decision after 3 sets), you should be able to progress with the Diablo. It's sweetspot is pretty big for a 95. Just be aware that it will not let you get away (as much) with sloppy technique, starting with footwork and ball focus. Take your eyes off the ball even one fraction of a second before the hit, and you will be rewarded with a nice clank feel. Thus, your progress may be slower than with a big light stick, but in the end it will be deeper and more complete.

Enjoy your journey.

bc-05
03-13-2012, 06:35 AM
well to be honest i might have a different opinion.. i was actually the total opposite to you..

when i started playing tennis when i was 13 yrs old.. i started out with a very small head racquet.. it was a 93 square.. i started with the pc600.. until one day (yes from watching too much tv) that i tried to bounce my racquet and it cracked.. then my dad, and tennis shops recommended me to go to what they call an oversize stick.. since it would be easier for me to hit with.. then i switched to it..

but for all the times that i was hitting with this big headed racquet.. which was prince original graphite.. i felt like i couldn't hit the ball properly.. it is easier to connect with, it feels better.. but my game is more of an "on the rise" baseliner on both side, i stay close to the baseline (i would say more of a crappier and more volley federer kind of player).. i was losing more matches in my life than ever it's just because i felt like the pog os is suited more to a spinnier brushing motion style of player... it just doesn't suit my game at all.. mind youm during these times i even tried alot of "tweener"s.. the radicals, the pure drives, the o3 tours, and the list goes on.. spent loads of money and all

until i bought a ncode n6.1 tour (yes that was when federer started becoming number 1 and he was my fav player).. which kind of ruined my game for a little bit since i couldn't hit the sweetspot at all.. it felt like i had to start allover again.. but then for some reason after adjusting to it.. i started winning more of my matches.. and just felt like hitting with my hands..

and 5 yrs later, i was playing in premier league (state tournaments) and in one year i was undefeated.. and about 2 yrs ago.. i found "the love of my life" back.. and i switched back to the pc600.. and for me i don't know why.. it just felt like i was born to play with midsize racquets.. and just last week i beat another pennant level 1 player here (probably equivalent to ntrp 5.5?).. using my pc600

so i really can't say.. my friend also started playing last year using a blx tour 90, yes at the start he was framing alot of balls.. but he practiced everyday for one year as if it was the only racquet available in the world.. and today, you couldn't tell as if he just started playing tennis.. maybe now he can compete in the pennant level 9? (i guess about 3.0ntrp?) so yeah.. thats just my experience anyway..

i guess you should hit with the diablo more often to see which one you like more?

thug the bunny
03-13-2012, 07:04 AM
Yeah you're right in that people are different. I was speaking from my experience. I came back to the game after a 20yr layoff, and pretty much wasted the first 2 or 3 yrs because my big light racket allowed me to do OK with a short, stabbing swing. I had no idea that I was not prepping well, positioning my feet, or watching the ball. I found that stuff out when I got a Bab PSL, and that's when I started really learning tennis.

I guess everything posted here on TT should be prefaced with 'In my opinion' or 'In my experience'...

bc-05
03-13-2012, 07:36 AM
the only reason im saying what im saying is that, i just dont want people to waste alot of money on something that is unecessary like myself..

in most of the sports that i was playing.. i was told that game improvement and advanced players equipment are day and night and i should start with beginners equipment..

for example in tennis.. i started with a pc600.. the so called expert (a friend of my dad who was does veteran touring) at the time told me something like

"i can serve 190-200kph and im only using a radical, while ur lucky if u could serve at 100-110kph.. ur not suited to the prestige mid.. maybe one day if you can get into the 5.5+ you should switch"

then i switched to a pog os.. but at the end of the day.. i did make it to the 5.5's.. and i ended with a midsize racquet and back at the aussie open radar, i served 207kph.. and on my journey i don't think switching to the OS really helped anything.. heck i don't even think i can serve as fast with an os..

then also in golf, i was told by a friend (i started 5 yrs ago, and i just started playing and he was a scratch player).. that i should play with a game improvement, despite me wanting to play with tour series (harder to play with)

he told me:

"look, im a scratch player? and ur score is only 120+.. and i've only switched to titleist ap1 when i was single handicapped.. i just think u'll struggle with forged iron"

so i believed him and bought a callaway x-14.. now, i can get 72 score.. and believe it or not, the other day i hit with a razr-x tour on demo.. it felt a hell lot better than the iron that i was growing up with.. and i really felt as if all these times im missing out on something great :S.. and now i have to spend a thousand or so dollars for something i could've gotten years ago when i started.. upset? YES

thug the bunny
03-13-2012, 07:51 AM
So wait, are you saying that you should have used advanced equipment from the start, or start with game improvement and then switch over?

I too switched to blade irons a while ago, and now I 'pure' even my 3 iron (about 220yds). I think 'game improvement' is mostly myth and marketing. With golf irons, most hackers' misses are thin or fat, and no amount of perimeter weighting or wierd head shape is going to turn those kinds of shots into good ones. Likewise, if you're putting a big bannana slice on the ball, that is due to fundamental issues (swing plane, timing, weight positioning) that no amount of game improvement technology can correct. IMO, the only thing game improvement equipment does is to NOT allow you to feel HOW you're missing the ball, so you'll just keep muddling along without knowing why you suck.

In D Zone
03-13-2012, 01:02 PM
Hey..I'm a beginner (2.0 - 2.5ish) and I've hit with a beginners' racket so far (Wilson Federer 110). My coach encouraged me to experience hitting with a pro racket. So I hit with his Prince Diablo Mid. The smaller head size wasn't the problem. It felt a little heavy but I'm pretty sure I can adjust to the weight. The real problem is that it was much powerful than my beginner's racket. I don't have to complete my swing to get the ball across. I'm worried that if I switch, I won't be able to develop my shots. What do you guys think?

Of course there's going to be big adjustment period if you are going from a beginner's racquet to a Diablo mid.
I would not worry much about the head size -it has more have to do with several factors
1. your skill level - if you don't have a good fundamental on how to hit fh or bh, even welding a 112 frame will do you no good.
2. the weight and set up of the frame - do you feel comfortable playing the frame which also include grip size and most important the string set up. Playing with smaller head size can feel like you are hitting with a board if not strung properly- so you might want to experiment or string it in the low 50's.
3. Once you found the frame that you can play comfortable - focus on developing and improving you fundamentals... ie. lots and lots of practice. Best to work on the wall or have a good playing partner who will give continous repeatition hitting the ball.

Yes, if the players in the early years (including women) can play with frames smaller than a 90 head size) - anyone can do it.
It all boils down to personal preferences.

bc-05
03-13-2012, 03:49 PM
i shouldve start with an advanced is what i'm saying.. like you said if anything those game improvement doesn't have any feel at all.. it just felt like hitting with a shovel..

it never improved my game, same as using oversize racquet.. never improve my game, never made me play better.. so my suggestion is just to play with your favourite racquet, no matter what the headsize is.. if you like the diablo then play with it :)

So wait, are you saying that you should have used advanced equipment from the start, or start with game improvement and then switch over?

I too switched to blade irons a while ago, and now I 'pure' even my 3 iron (about 220yds). I think 'game improvement' is mostly myth and marketing. With golf irons, most hackers' misses are thin or fat, and no amount of perimeter weighting or wierd head shape is going to turn those kinds of shots into good ones. Likewise, if you're putting a big bannana slice on the ball, that is due to fundamental issues (swing plane, timing, weight positioning) that no amount of game improvement technology can correct. IMO, the only thing game improvement equipment does is to NOT allow you to feel HOW you're missing the ball, so you'll just keep muddling along without knowing why you suck.

gloumar
03-14-2012, 02:43 AM
dont forget fuzzy yellow balls!

Yeah !! tremendous website :D
As I am a complete self-taught tennis player, this has been reaaaally useful to develop my shots (especially based on a mimetic approach).

About the racquet, the weight can be dangerous and cause serious injuries if you don't have the proper technique...
But personnaly I switched pretty early to a 320g racquet and loved it at the time ! Since then, I almost never got lighter (except Ozone Tour) !

It really forced me to have a better discipline and better technique at this time, I learned what was a control-oriented racquet and how to deal with the heft. Nice experience :)
Learn the proper movements in order to do you no harm. And yes, the string is really important too !

BU-Tennis
03-14-2012, 11:49 AM
The prince diablo mid is a great stick if you have the strength to wield it properly. Unlike you though, when I switched to it my senior year of high school from a way oversized wilson racquet it took me a few days to even get the ball over the net. The power level is so low if you dont have a full, fast swing.

My sister also had some success when she switched to this racquet, albeit for only one match. But her serves were so much stronger, the direction on her shots perfect, and volleys were incredibly crisp. It was really fascinating to watch because she had previously been using an nTour, so this was over 1 1/2 ounces heavier. However, she couldn't continue to use it because of the weight and problems with her wrists.

So I do not think moving to a heavier racquet will hinder your progress, but do make sure you have a good basis in all strokes and that you're not arming the ball too much or have weird hitches because the added weight will cause injury if you're not comfortable with your strokes.