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View Full Version : Quality: Klippermate vs $1000+ machines


gahaha
04-05-2012, 05:07 AM
I know that Klippermate is pretty basic and takes longer than the more expensive one out there, but is the quality the same? I have a stringer that most likely uses an electronic one, because it takes her less than 20 minutes for a string job and they all have been exceptional.

Then when I go to another stringer for a change and they have all been terrible, especially TW stringing, 57 tension from them feels like 40. Anyway is the quality capability the same for all machines provided the stringer put in the work? Or the more expensive ones are better overall?

COPEY
04-05-2012, 05:29 AM
There are quite a few threads on this subject already, however, in short...

- The quality (or lack thereof) of a stringjob lies predominantly in the stringer's skill/technique, not the machine.

- An electronic stringer/dropweight will typically yield a tighter stringbed when compared to a lockout (which is what TW uses) given the same reference tension.

Higher quality machines usually provide better racquet stability and clamping. Still, you could get a quality string job using a Klippermate. Could you use a Klippermate and string 6-7 racquets consecutively with consistent results? Not so sure about that one, but with an electronic machine it's fairly easy to do.

Others (infinitely more experienced than I) may come along to add more.

gahaha
04-05-2012, 05:52 AM
Could you use a Klippermate and string 6-7 racquets consecutively with consistent results? Not so sure about that one, but with an electronic machine it's fairly easy to do.

Argh, that's the question I was really looking for, but didn't know how to phrase it haha, that's a bummer because I thought I could save some money and buy a machine to string for myself and save some $$. But I have to spend $$ to save $$ I guess.

samarai
04-05-2012, 06:22 AM
Well I got a used Klippermate and did my first string job yesterday with some cheap strings. Strung it at 60 lbs and went out and hit with it yesterday night and it felt real good. No differrence than my 15 dollar job I was paying my local stringer. It did take me 3 hours but that's just because I was learning all the little nuiances and didnt have a manual to refer to. Just little bits of yuotube videos. I can probably cut my time in half next time. Now to get better strings.

COPEY
04-05-2012, 06:39 AM
Argh, that's the question I was really looking for, but didn't know how to phrase it haha, that's a bummer because I thought I could save some money and buy a machine to string for myself and save some $$. But I have to spend $$ to save $$ I guess.

I didn't say it was impossible, however, you'll fatigue a lot quicker using a Klippermate than you would using a higher-end machine, which usually results in shortcuts/mistakes for most. If you're looking at Klipper's you're just learning how to string, which means you don't need to worry about stringing for others for a while anyway. Stringing is easy. Becoming a 'good stringer' takes time and experience.

If you're sure you're going to be stringing for the long haul, I say buy as much machine as you can afford--get something nice, even if you overshoot your budget by several hundred dollars. It's one of the few investments you'll make that will pay for itself.

Well I got a used Klippermate and did my first string job yesterday with some cheap strings. Strung it at 60 lbs and went out and hit with it yesterday night and it felt real good. No differrence than my 15 dollar job I was paying my local stringer. It did take me 3 hours but that's just because I was learning all the little nuiances and didnt have a manual to refer to. Just little bits of yuotube videos. I can probably cut my time in half next time. Now to get better strings.

Congrats - keep watching videos, reading tips from all the highly experienced stringers on these boards, and practice, practice, practice!

gahaha
04-05-2012, 07:47 AM
Well I got a used Klippermate and did my first string job yesterday with some cheap strings. Strung it at 60 lbs and went out and hit with it yesterday night and it felt real good. No differrence than my 15 dollar job I was paying my local stringer. It did take me 3 hours but that's just because I was learning all the little nuiances and didnt have a manual to refer to. Just little bits of yuotube videos. I can probably cut my time in half next time. Now to get better strings.

Hmmn..Your purchase didn't come with a manual? I always thought it did..now I need to find a manual for 16x18 95 racquet.

cknobman
04-05-2012, 07:56 AM
I have a Klippermate and have been stringing for about 3 months now.

Stringing quality has little to nothing to do with my machine and everything to do with me.

First 3-4 stringjobs I did sucked because I was learning and inevitably something every time would not be quite right.

Now I am on my 7 string job and have gotten it down pretty darn good. Last 2 string jobs I did were fantastic and I could tell no difference between those and my previous local pro shop (who had always done good string jobs for me). Strings were tight, did not loose any noticeable amounts of tension, and play-ability was good.

Klippermate is not for a speed demon though. I've been able to get my time down to about 1:15 and I imagine eventually I will be able to get it down to and hour, but I dont ever see being able to do a string job in 20 minutes on my Klippermate.

Oh and for reference I have the stand with my Klippermate, so I am not stringing on a tabletop like some people.

gahaha
04-05-2012, 08:25 AM
Hmmn, an hour at least? I was hoping I'd be able to bring it down to 30-40 min. Looks like that's not the case, I might shell out a little more for a better machine then.

But yea, my stringer does good work, I know it takes less than 20min because one time I brought a racquet to her without calling ahead, and she said she'll do it right away and told me to come back in a bit, I drove to a nearby Dairy Queen which is like 5 min away and got in line, as I was ordering she said she was done, it was that quick!

nalvarado
04-05-2012, 08:57 AM
Well I got a used Klippermate and did my first string job yesterday with some cheap strings. Strung it at 60 lbs and went out and hit with it yesterday night and it felt real good. No differrence than my 15 dollar job I was paying my local stringer. It did take me 3 hours but that's just because I was learning all the little nuiances and didnt have a manual to refer to. Just little bits of yuotube videos. I can probably cut my time in half next time. Now to get better strings.
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1750654/16406586-Klippermate-Stringing-Instructions.pdf

Here is the manual, if you are interested.(via my dropbox)

Rabbit
04-05-2012, 09:09 AM
Hmmn, an hour at least? I was hoping I'd be able to bring it down to 30-40 min. Looks like that's not the case, I might shell out a little more for a better machine then.

But yea, my stringer does good work, I know it takes less than 20min because one time I brought a racquet to her without calling ahead, and she said she'll do it right away and told me to come back in a bit, I drove to a nearby Dairy Queen which is like 5 min away and got in line, as I was ordering she said she was done, it was that quick!

To be honest, your experience with your stringer is exactly why so many of my guys call me. They love being able to drop off a frame and get it back in, pardon me for this, 30 minutes or less.

They also have come to expect consistent results. Several of them are 5.0 or better and appreciate consistency. I also charge less than a pro shop and if I have their over grip I'll put a new one on as well.

fortun8son
04-05-2012, 10:33 AM
Even a $1200 Neos has a fatigue factor compared to the more expensive electronic machines, but it is faster than a Klippermate.

QuadCam
04-05-2012, 01:27 PM
the only fatique you'll get from a klippermate is if you are stringing all day long. If you are just stringing a racket here or there, you won't get fatigued. Come on....seriously???? fatigued from stringing a racket using a drop weight stringer???

The klipper is a great little stringer. I used mine for years to string my rackets. When playing alot, I was stringing a racket everyother day and it would normally take about an hour to do 1 racket.....and I am no speed demon!

samarai
04-06-2012, 05:49 AM
I bought the model used and so youtube was all I used as a reference. Thanks for the link.

Rabbit
04-06-2012, 06:20 AM
Even a $1200 Neos has a fatigue factor compared to the more expensive electronic machines, but it is faster than a Klippermate.

This is exactly right. Speaking from experience, the addition of the Wise tension head to my Neos has greatly lessened the fatigue factor. I've strung about 50 racquets this week for a tournament, all after my day job, and it's been a lot easier than when I used a crank.

G34
04-06-2012, 07:53 AM
I have a Klippermate and have been stringing for about 3 months now.

Klippermate is not for a speed demon though. I've been able to get my time down to about 1:15 and I imagine eventually I will be able to get it down to and hour, but I dont ever see being able to do a string job in 20 minutes on my Klippermate.

Oh and for reference I have the stand with my Klippermate, so I am not stringing on a tabletop like some people.


My first string job with the Klippermate took me 3 hours which was back in the early 90s. After stringing for the 15th time I got it down to 25-30 minutes. All strings jobs are done on a tabletop. Gotta make myself a stand with just the right height.

max
04-06-2012, 06:02 PM
A Klippermate works extremely well for the man who's stringing his own racquet, stringing it the way he wants it strung. And why rush the string job you do on your own racquet? Spend the extra ten minutes and make it NICE: that's why you get your own stringing machine, to get away from the junk jobs that come with those churning 'em out.

I do it about 45-50 minutes. I don't time myself. I drink a cup of coffee and fiddle with the radio, watch the backyard a bit: I'm doing this for myself, so I'm as careful as I want to be, not too concerned about rattling them out for the company.

loosegroove
04-07-2012, 07:13 AM
I have a gamma X2 which is similar to the Klippermate, except for it has the ratchet system on the dropweight. You can definitely get consistent results with the machine. I string my rackets in about 45 mins, which is fine since I normally am only doing one racket at a time just for me or an occasional friend.

And the 45 mins is a relaxed 45 mins. I'm not rushing, normally having some coffee or a beer while I have a game on the tube or something. It's actually rather therapeutic once you know what you're doing, and I don't mind the extra time. Now if you handed me 5 frames that needed to be done today, I wouldn't want to have to use the Klippermate.

topspin18
04-07-2012, 08:42 AM
I have a gamma drop weight which is similar to the klippermate and i am able to string a racket in 30-45 mins depending on the racket and string. Polys take a little longer than syn gut. I have done over 45 string jobs so far on the machine.

aussie
04-07-2012, 04:34 PM
It has been said so many times and it is always worth repeating, dropweights such as the Klippermate will give you consistent, replicable and accurate stringjobs albeit at a slow pace. The quality of the stringjob you produce is always in the hands of you, the stringer, not the machine.

Sure, you need to mount the frame securely and ensure the jaws and clamps are free from silicone buildup, but if you take your time (for me around an hour or so) the Klippermate will give you a stringjob you will be more than happy with. I string for friends, coaches and coaches' students on my Klippermate, and I am constantly told that my stringjobs are the best that the players have ever had.

The thing is don't waste time like I did - I waited too many years before buying my K'mate and my best tennis playing days are behind me. Don't make the same mistake - get a machine and start having fun with different strings, tensions, gauges etc......it's great fun and you won't regret it.

Wikky
04-07-2012, 10:52 PM
Then when I go to another stringer for a change and they have all been terrible, especially TW stringing, 57 tension from them feels like 40. Anyway is the quality capability the same for all machines provided the stringer put in the work? Or the more expensive ones are better overall?

Sorry to go off topic but I never understood why TW uses NEOS stringers when they must have the market to upgrade up to tournament level stringing machines to increase their consistency.

And along with everyone else I do believe that quality relates to the time put in factored by the cost of a machine. On the gamma 5800 ELS I can string a quality job in 18 minutes, on a klippermate I could probably attain the same job in around 45 minutes. Its all a matter of what kind of volume of racquets you'll be stringing.

fortun8son
04-08-2012, 02:10 PM
The Neos is a solid, reliable, versatile, semi-portable machine that doesn't need access to a power supply.

max
04-09-2012, 08:52 AM
Sorry to go off topic but I never understood why TW uses NEOS stringers when they must have the market to upgrade up to tournament level stringing machines to increase their consistency.

And along with everyone else I do believe that quality relates to the time put in factored by the cost of a machine. On the gamma 5800 ELS I can string a quality job in 18 minutes, on a klippermate I could probably attain the same job in around 45 minutes. Its all a matter of what kind of volume of racquets you'll be stringing.

IMHO, I agree entirely: it depends on the volume you're doing. . . unless you're really into Gear, in which case there's a wide assortment of cool machines to toy with. Thinking it over, I've had string jobs done on expensive machines as well as Kmates, and really haven't been able to tell the difference. I've had bad string jobs from expensive machines. . . and perhaps what really matters most is the quality of the Stringer-Person! Perhaps the expensive machines reduce screw ups.

Centerforward71
05-08-2012, 06:57 PM
After being tired of inconsistent string jobs from $4000 machine I got the klipperMate and it is awesome. Fast. Noo. Consistent yesssss. After about 5 racquets I am down to about 1hr per while watching Tv. Gravity needs no calibration as long as you do it right jobs will be as god as any machine. Price not a factor

zapvor
05-08-2012, 07:34 PM
its amazing how fast you can go on a neos, despite its lack of electronic pull and the lack of 360 degree turn

Wikky
05-08-2012, 10:01 PM
After being tired of inconsistent string jobs from $4000 machine I got the klipperMate and it is awesome. Fast. Noo. Consistent yesssss. After about 5 racquets I am down to about 1hr per while watching Tv. Gravity needs no calibration as long as you do it right jobs will be as god as any machine. Price not a factor


.... what machine was that and were you the one stringing it? And if it is yours what has happened to this 4,000 stringing machine :neutral:?

Centerforward71
05-09-2012, 04:39 AM
.... what machine was that and were you the one stringing it? And if it is yours what has happened to this 4,000 stringing machine :neutral:?

The machines are at a well known shop, no I was not the stringer

The machine is fine I was making the point that price DOES not equal quality string job AT ALL.

If anyone is serious about their tennis I don't see HOW you don't string your own machines. And yes the poor string jobs were stringer caused bye either not calibrating or just sloppy.

Wikky
05-09-2012, 06:21 AM
The machines are at a well known shop, no I was not the stringer

The machine is fine I was making the point that price DOES not equal quality string job AT ALL.

If anyone is serious about their tennis I don't see HOW you don't string your own machines. And yes the poor string jobs were stringer caused bye either not calibrating or just sloppy.


I just wanted to know if it might be for sale and if it was yours....

zapvor
05-09-2012, 10:20 AM
I just wanted to know if it might be for sale and if it was yours....

thats what i wanted to know too! haha

Pavlo
05-18-2012, 02:02 PM
I strung for my school using a Neos for several years. It took me about 30 minutes by the end of my time with that machine. Just got a klippermate, and it took me 35 minutes. The klipper beats or equals the neos because I like the drop weight better than the lockout. However, fixed clamps are much better than floating. You also have to be really sure to have the racket secured on the klipper or I could definitely see it slipping. All this being said, I am perfectly happy with the klipper because I'm not going to string tennis rackets for a living.

fortun8son
05-18-2012, 10:24 PM
The Neos is a (relatively) fast, easy mounting, durable workhorse that requires minimal maintenance, and you can place it anywhere without needing a power supply.

jgrushing
05-19-2012, 11:47 AM
Lots of people talk about how slow the Klippermate is. I've strung a V1 Classic, my racquets of choice and admittedly an easy one to string, in 22 minutes. Thirty minutes is a breeze. Of course, I've strung primarily on the KM forever. The only thing that's a bit slow for me on my KM is poly.

boramiNYC
05-19-2012, 03:37 PM
^^ Agree. Leisurely, but not drinking beers and coffees, about 40min tops.

levy1
05-20-2012, 03:09 AM
I know that Klippermate is pretty basic and takes longer than the more expensive one out there, but is the quality the same? I have a stringer that most likely uses an electronic one, because it takes her less than 20 minutes for a string job and they all have been exceptional.

Then when I go to another stringer for a change and they have all been terrible, especially TW stringing, 57 tension from them feels like 40. Anyway is the quality capability the same for all machines provided the stringer put in the work? Or the more expensive ones are better overall?
Built like a tank! I just listed one.

Rabbit
05-20-2012, 02:51 PM
I know that Klippermate is pretty basic and takes longer than the more expensive one out there, but is the quality the same? I have a stringer that most likely uses an electronic one, because it takes her less than 20 minutes for a string job and they all have been exceptional.

Then when I go to another stringer for a change and they have all been terrible, especially TW stringing, 57 tension from them feels like 40. Anyway is the quality capability the same for all machines provided the stringer put in the work? Or the more expensive ones are better overall?

IMO, and I've owned a Tremont, Gamma Dropweight, Neos and an added Wise, stringing machines are like natural gut and honestly, you get what you pay for. There is a reason professional tournaments use electronic machines. If dropweights were the best, you bet they'd have a presence on the tour.

gmatheis
05-20-2012, 05:42 PM
IMO, and I've owned a Tremont, Gamma Dropweight, Neos and an added Wise, stringing machines are like natural gut and honestly, you get what you pay for. There is a reason professional tournaments use electronic machines. If dropweights were the best, you bet they'd have a presence on the tour.

Yes and that reason is speed, you don't get Nadals racket back to him on court in under 15 minutes using a drop weight.

Rabbit
05-21-2012, 03:28 AM
Yes and that reason is speed, you don't get Nadals racket back to him on court in under 15 minutes using a drop weight.

Partly, yes. But read what the pros on the boards say. Consistency and quality trump speed every time. If drop weights were superior, Nadal and others would adjust their on court equipment accordingly.

And, from my own experience with 3 different machines, I know for a fact that the Neos has a better mounting system, better clamps, and better build than the vast majority of drop weight machines. I also know that the Wilson Baiardo and Babolat Star 5 have advantages over my machine. The difference is, I don't try to say otherwise.

The simple fact is, floating clamps don't do as good a job as fixed clamps. The resultant string bed with the Neos has been more consistent and firmer than anything I produced with my Gamma drop weight. Beyond that, the Wise tension head does an even better job and produces very consistent results.

Don't get me wrong, there is nothing wrong with a drop weight. In the end, it's all what you get used to. But I think it's a mistake to claim equivalency with a top end machine, it just ain't so. I know for a fact as well that when I strung on a drop weight, the tension setting I used was 8 pounds higher than what I used when I started using my Neos. I know for a fact that I had to drop 3 - 5 pounds off my number when I cut over to the Wise.

jgrushing
05-21-2012, 04:11 AM
I'm not going to argue quality with you. I know that my $145 Klippmate is not a Star 5 or even a Neos. But, generally, when I've strung for folks who were used to the pro shop, I've had to lower their reference tension. Same reference tension on my brother-in-law's Neos is looser.

lvuong
05-21-2012, 04:29 AM
Yes and that reason is speed, you don't get Nadals racket back to him on court in under 15 minutes using a drop weight.

The most time consuming aspect is weaving the cross which are the same across machine. Drop-weight tensioning does not take much time.

Wikky
05-21-2012, 03:58 PM
I've heard a couple of people say that they can string a quality racquet with a klippermate / dropweight in under 20-25 minutes. The only reason I highly doubt this is because i'm including the time it takes to adjust the mount, change the tension for the tie offs and possibly for the crosses, and the additional 5-10 seconds it takes to apply tension for each string.

I'd be extremely interested/impressed to see someone post a video doing all of these in under 20 minutes.

jgrushing
05-21-2012, 04:07 PM
I said I've done one of my V1 Classics in 22 minutes. That's mounting the racquet and doing a one piece job. No changing the tension for tie offs (unnecessary IMO) or for the crosses in this case. Just a basic string job.

A normal two piece job that I do most of the time is easily done in 30 minutes. I just finished one as a matter of fact. Keep in mind that I've strung on my KM since 1992; probably 1000 racquets.

I have considered recording a video of the partial job just to show that getting the bar to horizontal is not a real issue. Stay tuned...maybe soon.

Wikky
05-21-2012, 04:11 PM
That would be awesome if you could post a full video of your stringing, its great to pick up some of the little techniques people use when they string. I feel like even if I watch someone who just started stringing you can always learn something. Keep us updated if you decide to post something jgrushing!

Wuppy
05-21-2012, 04:42 PM
After about 8 string jobs it still takes me an hour. But I go slow and do the Wuppy method on crosses.

jgrushing
05-21-2012, 04:51 PM
There's still lots of efficiency to be gained after only 8 jobs. An hour's not bad. Weaving and handling the string is big. Also, just not delaying between actions--knowing what to do next. That's where you save time.

gmatheis
05-21-2012, 05:19 PM
I said I've done one of my V1 Classics in 22 minutes. That's mounting the racquet and doing a one piece job. No changing the tension for tie offs (unnecessary IMO) or for the crosses in this case. Just a basic string job.

A normal two piece job that I do most of the time is easily done in 30 minutes. I just finished one as a matter of fact. Keep in mind that I've strung on my KM since 1992; probably 1000 racquets.

I have considered recording a video of the partial job just to show that getting the bar to horizontal is not a real issue. Stay tuned...maybe soon.

is that 22 minutes using poly ?

jgrushing
05-21-2012, 05:56 PM
No way. Gosen OGM--not a poly fan. Poly on my KM takes more like 40 minutes or so. I love the cam gripper but it's not great for poly.

Wuppy
05-22-2012, 08:08 PM
There's still lots of efficiency to be gained after only 8 jobs. An hour's not bad. Weaving and handling the string is big. Also, just not delaying between actions--knowing what to do next. That's where you save time.

Yeah weaving kills me, especially on stiff poly. Takes forever, I can't just snake it through in seconds like some guys.

Irvin
05-23-2012, 03:31 AM
^^Try the bead method it helps you get a better grip on the string and you learn to weave faster.

cknobman
05-23-2012, 05:53 AM
Yeah weaving kills me, especially on stiff poly. Takes forever, I can't just snake it through in seconds like some guys.

Sometimes the stiff poly can be a blessing in disguise though.

I have found that some of the super soft multi/syn gut strings are really hard and aggravating when stringing crosses trying to get the string through holes that are covered up by mains. The string is so soft and flexible it can be a real pain to punch through those holes even with tools moving the mains out of the way.

Stiff polys can usually punch right through the covered holes no problemo.

Rabbit
05-23-2012, 06:13 AM
Sometimes the stiff poly can be a blessing in disguise though.

I have found that some of the super soft multi/syn gut strings are really hard and aggravating when stringing crosses trying to get the string through holes that are covered up by mains. The string is so soft and flexible it can be a real pain to punch through those holes even with tools moving the mains out of the way.

Stiff polys can usually punch right through the covered holes no problemo.

I have found that if you cut the end at as severe an angle as you can, either with some snips or a one-edged razor, most any string will ease by a blocked hole.

Wikky
05-23-2012, 04:53 PM
I've always been a loop and pull weaver not a snake/push so stiff poly really isn't a problem anymore. Irvin thanks again for that bead method weaving video, its helped me teach a lot of people how to weave and saved a ton of time.

shogun90
06-29-2012, 11:13 AM
I've always been a loop and pull weaver not a snake/push so stiff poly really isn't a problem anymore. Irvin thanks again for that bead method weaving video, its helped me teach a lot of people how to weave and saved a ton of time.

I also love using the bead method. Saves a considerable amount of time.

floridatennisdude
07-01-2012, 03:30 AM
I love my little Klipper, but I only string my own frames on it. It is not a machine that you would want to use for professional use. It's too slow and there is too much room for error if you try to go fast. Also, the teeth on the drop pulley get wax build up that needs to be cleaned about every 2-3 frames, depending on string.

I love it and it has paid off for me personally (vs paying for stringing) many times over. I just wouldn't try to make a living using it.

mrw
07-01-2012, 05:13 AM
If stringing for personal use, The Klipper is fantastic. Does a great consistent job. If I were doing production work, I would want more bells and whistles.

It takes me about 45 minutes to string a hybrid with great results.

spacediver
07-01-2012, 10:29 PM
been stringing my own racquets with a second hand klippermate for close to a year and a half, and get beautiful, consistent results.

cknobman
07-03-2012, 07:20 PM
I finally pulled off a string job on my Kilpper in 1 hour start to finish.

I strung a hybrid of poly mains and syn gut crosses.

Of course I was extra motivated to go fast as I started late last night and my wife was wanting to go to bed (my stringer is setup on a stand in my room and Im to lazy too move it) and kept telling me to hurry up.

I thought the string job would not be good since I hurried so much but I played with it tonight and it was great. Tension felt just fine on it.

WINZOWAR
07-03-2012, 07:55 PM
It takes me 45 minutes to an hour on the Klippermate depending on the quality of TV I'm watching.

I've only done synthetic or poly. Anybody string gut on the Klipper? Wondering if it's anymore difficult than on a high end machine.

BigGriff
07-03-2012, 08:33 PM
It takes me 45 minutes to an hour on the Klippermate depending on the quality of TV I'm watching.

I've only done synthetic or poly. Anybody string gut on the Klipper? Wondering if it's anymore difficult than on a high end machine.

I've strung gut on a Klipper. I was careful as hell because that cam gripper isn't gut or soft multi friendly. It can be done though.

Wikky
07-04-2012, 12:58 AM
obviously high end machines do help when stringing gut and i've actually completely stopped prestreching during prep and do it all on the machine now. Gut has become much easier to work with and I'd actually take stringing up VS over a set of FXP Tour any day.

VanillaBean
07-16-2012, 12:43 PM
I usually have to clean the string jaws once or more per job due to slippage. Is there something wrong with the jaws or is it possibly me? (got a used klippermate)

cknobman
07-17-2012, 02:03 PM
I usually have to clean the string jaws once or more per job due to slippage. Is there something wrong with the jaws or is it possibly me? (got a used klippermate)

Something is wrong, I only have to clean mine once every 5 stringjobs or so.

What kind of string are you using? If it is gut maybe it could be because of the amount of wax they put on them?

I use a hybrid of poly syn gut and depending on the syn gut makes the difference on when I have to clean my Klipper. Some syn gut has more coating on it than others.

Wikky
07-17-2012, 09:06 PM
Worse slippage strings i've ever had to deal with are definitely xcel / premier LT. There are a couple of 18 gauge syn guts I've done but I can't remember the names.... A starting clamp can help but I hate how it always creates ghosting and seems to flatten the string.

VanillaBean
07-17-2012, 09:10 PM
ive used several synthetic guts, polys, and multis but never natural gut and all to the same effect.

struggle
07-17-2012, 09:31 PM
my old klippermate (it was branded Court & Slope) had a linear gripper and a crude ratchet. i loved that machine. Bought it used in 1984-5, somewheres about. it had to be a handful of years old at that point. Also, it had a crude 6 point mounting brace sorta rig, seemed to be an add on of sorts.

vise grips, one of them aluminum floating clamps. no starting clamp. it was great.

gimme another beer!