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View Full Version : What machine for fastest, easiest, consistent string job?


loosegroove
04-11-2012, 09:19 PM
I know people often say, buy the best you can afford, but there is a point of overkill for the average home stringer. And as you go up in price, you don't necessarily go up in speed. So with that said, what stringer would you recommend for fastest, most efficient string jobs that are of course consistent. That factors in ease of mounting the racket, how quick the clamps are to operate, etc. I assume it would be some self-centering mount machine with an electronic linear pull?

Recommendations please! Thanks!

COPEY
04-11-2012, 11:36 PM
Fairly common question, which explains all the views with only one reply.

(1) Have you read this (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=349814)?
(2) What kind of budget are you working with? Overkill for you could easily be low-end to middle of the road for another.
(3) Speed should not be a priority. You improve your speed with practice, experience, regardless of machine. If you get to where you're stringing a racquet in approx 40-45 min (includes cutting out strings, frame inspection) you're doing pretty good.

Irvin
04-12-2012, 04:22 AM
I guess it all depends on the stringer but I have done my fastest work on single action clamps on glide bard machines. Hands down if I were looking for the fastest I would go for the NEOS 1000.

Rabbit
04-12-2012, 04:31 AM
^^^^^^^^^^+1
the glide bar clamps are faster, but not as cool as swivel clamps

add to that a Wise tension head and you're about as fast and consistent as you can get.

Note that 20 minutes as average on the Neos after some practice. If you hurry, you can get down in the teens pretty easy

kabrac
04-12-2012, 05:49 AM
[QUOTE=Irvin;6460077]I guess it all depends on the stringer but I have done my fastest work on single action clamps on glide bard machines. Hands down if I were looking for the fastest I would go for the NEOS 1000.[/QUOT

I agree, the neos 1000 is a great setup. Go to the harware store and pick up a 1x2" bushing for total racquet clearance. You'll also need an extra washer, 1". So under the turntable, you'll have the 1" washer that comes with machine, pick up the 1"X2" bushing to go under the washer, pick up another 1" washer to go under the bushing. Works great!

loosegroove
04-12-2012, 06:44 AM
Fairly common question, which explains all the views with only one reply.

(1) Have you read this (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=349814)?
(2) What kind of budget are you working with? Overkill for you could easily be low-end to middle of the road for another.
(3) Speed should not be a priority. You improve your speed with practice, experience, regardless of machine. If you get to where you're stringing a racquet in approx 40-45 min (includes cutting out strings, frame inspection) you're doing pretty good.

Thanks! Maybe I should have been more specific.
1)Yup, read the first.
2)And this is for a buddy, who doesn't really have a set budget since money isn't really a factor. Hence there is such thing as overkill. I'm not going to recommend he gets a Babolat Sensor!
3) And personally I am doing string jobs in 45 mins, on a Gamma X-2. So I am well aware of this. Doesn't mean that certain machines aren't easier and faster.

loosegroove
04-12-2012, 06:49 AM
I had a feeling the NEOS 1000 would be mentioned. Though would it be better to maybe go with the newer 1500 for versatility? Also since there was mention of upgrading the machine eventually with a Wise tension head, would it better just to start with the Gamma 5800?

KerryR
04-12-2012, 12:26 PM
I have and Ektelon H, which is a Neos 1000 before Ektelon sold the rights to make the machine to Prince.

While I adore the machine, I have to say I covet the sleek lines of the high end electronic machines; many have next to nothing for string loops to catch on. My machine LOVES to snag loops when I string stiff polys (not much of a problem with synguts). So, If I had no budget limitations, I'd go for a snag-free design...

Any time folks mention a Neos, I always feel inclined to mention that TennisMachines often has used but re-furbished Neos and Ektelon H's for sale... I got mine there and couldn't be happier (for what I paid).

Irvin
04-12-2012, 03:14 PM
I had a feeling the NEOS 1000 would be mentioned. Though would it be better to maybe go with the newer 1500 for versatility? Also since there was mention of upgrading the machine eventually with a Wise tension head, would it better just to start with the Gamma 5800?

You said you wanted the fastest that alone gave the nod to the NEOS glide bar machine. Yes the 1500 is more versatile and so would be the Gamma 6004. Not sure about the 5800 as I have never used one

loosegroove
04-12-2012, 06:22 PM
You said you wanted the fastest that alone gave the nod to the NEOS glide bar machine. Yes the 1500 is more versatile and so would be the Gamma 6004. Not sure about the 5800 as I have never used one

Yeah, of course. I guess after the fact I was thinking maybe it would be worth it to sacrifice a little speed for the added versatility. I think I'm going to do a little research on the Gamma 5800 series. Anyone with experience with these, feel free to chime in. Thanks folks!

stringwalla
04-12-2012, 07:31 PM
here to debate the "speed" aspect.

Experienced stringers are as "fast" on electronic as crank. They learn to work other aspects of the process as the machine is pulling which nullifies the extra speed of the crank. I have used both for many years and can record times within seconds of each other given the same frame and stringing variables.

In addition, the variance in the stringers rotation of the crank can present some inconsistencies in the pull tension. But yes, it probably is easier for a beginner to become proficient on a crank. (that's how I started):)

zapvor
04-12-2012, 10:11 PM
i find the babolat stars to be super easy for me. i have used the neos and i see its pros but i didnt learn on it and dont use it daily so i am not as used to its different qualities.