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View Full Version : Should tennis be so susceptible to outside conditions?


FlashFlare11
05-30-2012, 04:23 PM
I've been thinking about and meaning to ask about this for a while now. As tennis players and tennis fans, it seems that we have so much more to take into account when we discuss strategies, match play, etc. than other sports. We have to consider wind speed, wind direction, surface, humidity, temperature, altitude, and much more. These factors affect not only the tennis ball, but also racquet strings. In my view, tennis has so many more outside factors outside of the control of the players than most, if not, all sports.

Do you agree with tennis being so susceptible to outside conditions? If not, what changes do you think could be made to balls, racquets, etc. that lessen the impact of various conditions on matches?

Sid_Vicious
05-30-2012, 04:29 PM
That's true. Tennis play can be affected by many miscellaneous factors.

The only (reasonable) way to deal with these conditions is to make everything indoor: Indoor clay, Indoor grass, Indoor Hard....


However, it is important to remember that things like wind speed, direction, humidity, temperature, etc. are an intrinsic part of the game. Wimbledon, the oldest tennis tournament, was plagued with horrible damp conditions for 100+ years before getting a roof in 2009. Many purists were upset with putting a roof over centre court.

FlashFlare11
05-30-2012, 04:33 PM
That's true. Tennis play can be affected by many miscellaneous factors.

The only (reasonable) way to deal with these conditions is to make everything indoor: Indoor clay, Indoor grass, Indoor Hard....


However, it is important to remember that things like wind speed, direction, humidity, temperature, etc. are an intrinsic part of the game. Wimbledon, the oldest tennis tournament, was plagued with horrible damp conditions for 100+ years before getting a roof in 2009. Many purists were upset with putting a roof over centre court.

Yes, I agree. But I think a lot of tennis' vulnerability comes from the ball itself. It's light and can easily be dampened and manipulated. I think it would be difficult, however, changing to a ball that's no so easily affected by outlying conditions because it would have a great impact on shot selection and technique (spins, for example, would not be as effective). Strings, too, are easily affected by outside conditions as well.

kragster
05-30-2012, 04:34 PM
I think a variety of conditions add to viewing pleasure in all sports AS LONG AS THE OVERALL LEVEL OF THE PLAYING FIELD IS NOT AFFECTED MUCH. For example outdoor table tennis would not be fun as a ping pong ball is too susceptible to wind and even the best players would be shanking left and right!

I can't think of any Tennis conditions I have seen so far that cause a massive drop in level of the field. Most people grow up playing tennis outdoors so wind/humidity etc are things they can deal with fairly well.

It's great to have the indoor outdoor contrast in tennis.

FlashFlare11
05-30-2012, 04:38 PM
I think a variety of conditions add to viewing pleasure in all sports AS LONG AS THE OVERALL LEVEL OF THE PLAYING FIELD IS NOT AFFECTED MUCH. For example outdoor table tennis would not be fun as a ping pong ball is too susceptible to wind and even the best players would be shanking left and right!

I can't think of any Tennis conditions I have seen so far that cause a massive drop in level of the field. Most people grow up playing tennis outdoors so wind/humidity etc are things they can deal with fairly well.

It's great to have the indoor outdoor contrast in tennis.

Well, I think wind, if strong enough, can create a noticable drop quality of play.

Sid_Vicious
05-30-2012, 04:39 PM
Well, I think wind, if strong enough, can create a noticable drop quality of play.

Nadal vs Murray IW 2009.

Horrendous. Murray couldn't barely hold his own in a rivalry. Nadal just played percentage tennis and won easily.

FlashFlare11
05-30-2012, 04:42 PM
Nadal vs Murray IW 2009.

Horrendous. Murray couldn't barely hold his own in a rivalry. Nadal just played percentage tennis and won easily.

Yep, wind can be very tough to deal with, and it's more than just a physical force. I know that when I play in the wind, I feel less confident in my shots and more easily frustrated when I miss shots or double fault on serves. It becomes more of a "who can keep the ball in court" contest.

Sid_Vicious
05-30-2012, 04:44 PM
Yep, wind can be very tough to deal with, and it's more than just a physical force. I know that when I play in the wind, I feel less confident in my shots and more easily frustrated when I miss shots or double fault on serves. It becomes more of a "who can keep the ball in court" contest.

What I hate the most about windy tennis sessions is that on one side, I can crush the ball and it will stay in. On the other side of the court, bunting the ball will cause it to float 10 feet out. :evil:

FlashFlare11
05-30-2012, 04:48 PM
What I hate the most about windy tennis sessions is that on one side, I can crush the ball and it will stay in. On the other side of the court, bunting the ball will cause it to float 10 feet out. :evil:

Exactly, or having a neutral rally against the wind is anything but. I either have to hit much harder or leave everything short.

kragster
05-30-2012, 05:56 PM
Nadal vs Murray IW 2009.

Horrendous. Murray couldn't barely hold his own in a rivalry. Nadal just played percentage tennis and won easily.

Ah yes, that would probably qualify as one of those matches made less fun by wind conditions.

Rain would be another condition that can throw a wrench in the works as far as quality of tennis.