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View Full Version : Too much lag on the forehand


Kobble
02-19-2004, 05:31 AM
My routine forehand looks typically like Guga's, and if that wasn't enough lag, my high forehand has even more. The effectiveness and consistency is pretty good on both, but I just don't like the way the high forehand looks. Imagine Muster's high forehand with pre swing changes Sergio Garcia like lag, and that is my put away forehand. This leads me to take a poll about grip firmness.

What is considered the ideal firmness(1-10 scale) to keep your wrist and grip at on the routine and high forehand?

On a scale of 1-10 what do most of you out there use?

I would rate my grip firmness at around 6 on the routine, and approximately 5-5.5 on the high forehand

Bungalo Bill
02-19-2004, 07:23 PM
Kobble,

It sounds like to me that you also have to loose of a wrist as well. When your wrist is laid back, you want the lower arm and the wrist in a fixed position when it begins to move forward. Later, as you get better you can add a bit of elasticity in the wrist for extra punch.

The grip as you mentioned could be the culprate as well. A good measure for grip firmness is to hold the racquet and have someone pull it out of your hands. There should be a bit of a struggle, not too much, but not too easy either.

Another way is to apply the same pressure as you would hold a bird. You would apply just enough pressure to hold it (without hurting it) but also not letting it fly away.

jjrl2004
01-28-2009, 07:50 PM
Well you don't want a very firm wrist or you may injure yourself.

Djokovicfan4life
01-28-2009, 09:07 PM
Kobble,

It sounds like to me that you also have to loose of a wrist as well. When your wrist is laid back, you want the lower arm and the wrist in a fixed position when it begins to move forward. Later, as you get better you can add a bit of elasticity in the wrist for extra punch.

The grip as you mentioned could be the culprate as well. A good measure for grip firmness is to hold the racquet and have someone pull it out of your hands. There should be a bit of a struggle, not too much, but not too easy either.

Another way is to apply the same pressure as you would hold a bird. You would apply just enough pressure to hold it (without hurting it) but also not letting it fly away.

Wow, that is a great analogy! I notice you said that a little bit of elasticity in the wrist is OK, which was good to see. I always hear everyone saying that the wrist stays completely laid back at all times during the forward swing, but I've definitely added a little forward motion into the ball over the last few months and my forehand has really improved a lot.

Bungalo Bill
01-29-2009, 07:55 AM
Wow, that is a great analogy! I notice you said that a little bit of elasticity in the wrist is OK, which was good to see. I always hear everyone saying that the wrist stays completely laid back at all times during the forward swing, but I've definitely added a little forward motion into the ball over the last few months and my forehand has really improved a lot.

Just so long as the "added" forward motion is a natural byproduct of a more relaxed hand area that allows the wrist area to work as a hinge.