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View Full Version : I'm Sick of Players Trying On Returns


TTMR
09-16-2012, 08:23 AM
I think one of the worst consequences of molasses-ized surfaces, polyester strings and beachball tennis balls has to be how it has changed the dynamic of the return game.

I loved how in the 90s, on real surfaces especially, players would simply tank return games. Or they'd just try and go huge on the return and fail 95% of the time. If the returner had to take more than a couple of steps, he'd concede the point. If he was down 40-0 or 40-15 while returning, he'd push the next return out simply to get on with serving. That's the way it is supposed to be. Four points and move on, rinse and repeat; fast forward to the tiebreaker as quickly as possible.

And what's with this nonsense of players putting in effort running down drop shots and retrieving would-be winners and overheads? I was sick of this during the US Open final push-fest. Roddick was one of the few holdouts who consistently refused to run down drop shots. He knew it would cost him some points, but he also knew his manhood would remain intact. Sadly, those values, once widespread in the men's game, were likely retired with him. This isn't a big surprise, as the ATP and ITF have made a conscious decision to reward stick-figured nancy boys who like to run around all day, more reminiscent of 1970s WTA moonball tennis than anything else.

Don't get me started on the two-handed backhand.

The Bawss
09-16-2012, 08:37 AM
I think one of the worst consequences of molasses-ized surfaces, polyester strings and beachball tennis balls has to be how it has changed the dynamic of the return game.

I loved how in the 90s, on real surfaces especially, players would simply tank return games. Or they'd just try and go huge on the return and fail 95% of the time. If the returner had to take more than a couple of steps, he'd concede the point. If he was down 40-0 or 40-15 while returning, he'd push the next return out simply to get on with serving. That's the way it is supposed to be. Four points and move on, rinse and repeat; fast forward to the tiebreaker as quickly as possible.

And what's with this nonsense of players putting in effort running down drop shots and retrieving would-be winners and overheads? I was sick of this during the US Open final push-fest. Roddick was one of the few holdouts who consistently refused to run down drop shots. He knew it would cost him some points, but he also knew his manhood would remain intact. Sadly, those values, once widespread in the men's game, were likely retired with him. This isn't a big surprise, as the ATP and ITF have made a conscious decision to reward stick-figured nancy boys who like to run around all day, more reminiscent of 1970s WTA moonball tennis than anything else.

Don't get me started on the two-handed backhand.

http://i.imgur.com/ZnqQ5.gif

Bowtiesarecool
09-16-2012, 08:40 AM
"...That's the way it is supposed to be. Four points and move on, rinse and repeat; fast forward to the tiebreaker as quickly as possible."

lol. Wait, you were being serious. Let me laugh even hader, PWHAHAHAROFL.

"And what's with this nonsense of players putting in effort running down drop shots and retrieving would-be winners and overheads?"

"He knew it would cost him some points, but he also knew his manhood would remain intact."
[/QUOTE]

So, working hard isn't "manly"? Do you have kids? If so, is that what you teach them?

TTMR
09-16-2012, 08:46 AM
"...That's the way it is supposed to be. Four points and move on, rinse and repeat; fast forward to the tiebreaker as quickly as possible."

lol. Wait, you were being serious. Let me laugh even hader, PWHAHAHAROFL.

"And what's with this nonsense of players putting in effort running down drop shots and retrieving would-be winners and overheads?"

"He knew it would cost him some points, but he also knew his manhood would remain intact."


So, working hard isn't "manly"? Do you have kids? If so, is that what you teach them?

I teach them to work well, so they don't have to work hard. Furthermore, I'd argue it's harder work to learn to win the right way than to simply pull any trick out of the old pusher toolkit just to unconvincingly win a few piddling points on your opponent's unforced errors.

Seriously, you're tour professionals. Man up or get out.

Bowtiesarecool
09-16-2012, 09:01 AM
I teach them to work well, so they don't have to work hard. Furthermore, I'd argue it's harder work to learn to win the right way than to simply pull any trick out of the old pusher toolkit just to unconvincingly win a few piddling points on your opponent's unforced errors.

Seriously, you're tour professionals. Man up or get out.

See, thing is, you're missing the point. Just because that's how you would like the game to be played, doesn't make it "the right way". Your opinion essentially is that if the reciever has to move more than sightly, just let the server have the point; Don't chase down any groundie that isn't coming right towards you; Just let the guy have this one so we can lose a tiebreaker and get home in time to watch "The Voice". I feel bad for anyone that looks up to you.

fuzzyball
09-16-2012, 09:07 AM
I loved how in the 90s, on real surfaces especially, players would simply tank return games. Or they'd just try and go huge on the return and fail 95% of the time. If the returner had to take more than a couple of steps, he'd concede the point. If he was down 40-0 or 40-15 while returning, he'd push the next return out simply to get on with serving. That's the way it is supposed to be. Four points and move on, rinse and repeat; fast forward to the tiebreaker as quickly as possible.

Please tell us which book tells us that it is the way it is supposed to be!

FlashFlare11
09-16-2012, 09:16 AM
I can't tell if the posters responding to the OP realize that he's being sarcastic.

Bowtiesarecool
09-16-2012, 09:18 AM
Please tell us which book tells us that it is the way it is supposed to be!

Same book that says men should play 3 set finals, and that we should all aspire to gargle Sampras' N**sack because he's the god of tennis.

TTMR
09-16-2012, 10:45 AM
http://i.imgur.com/ZnqQ5.gif

Do you think this guy, if a tennis player, would prance around like Baryshnikov when playing points? No. He'd overpower his opponent into submission with an untouchable serve, flat eastern forehand and a crushing overhead. His (one-handed, obviously) backhand would be a low-percentage all or nothing kill shot. Furthermore, he'd know his service games would carry him through, and would give his opponent, as a server, the respect he deserves. He certainly wouldn't dignify drop shots with a response.

One person here questioned how I educate my children. I teach them to have confidence. Have confidence in your serve, know that no matter what, you won't be broken. That way you won't have to bore us to death with your yawn-inducing pushing.

Sentinel
09-16-2012, 11:00 AM
TTMR knows how it's done. Great job, Sir, hats off.

TTMR, you need to teach sureshs the lost art.

Ms Nadal
09-16-2012, 11:04 AM
The points did end quicker and shorter matches. Those were the great days for sure.

nereis
09-16-2012, 11:10 AM
http://assets0.ordienetworks.com/images/GifGuide/clapping/kypaf.jpg.gif

power level 800
09-16-2012, 11:25 AM
http://wwwv.lamarihuana.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/a0c69_Obama.gif

NadalDramaQueen
09-16-2012, 11:29 AM
I think one of the worst consequences of molasses-ized surfaces, polyester strings and beachball tennis balls has to be how it has changed the dynamic of the return game.

I loved how in the 90s, on real surfaces especially, players would simply tank return games. Or they'd just try and go huge on the return and fail 95% of the time. If the returner had to take more than a couple of steps, he'd concede the point. If he was down 40-0 or 40-15 while returning, he'd push the next return out simply to get on with serving. That's the way it is supposed to be. Four points and move on, rinse and repeat; fast forward to the tiebreaker as quickly as possible.

And what's with this nonsense of players putting in effort running down drop shots and retrieving would-be winners and overheads? I was sick of this during the US Open final push-fest. Roddick was one of the few holdouts who consistently refused to run down drop shots. He knew it would cost him some points, but he also knew his manhood would remain intact. Sadly, those values, once widespread in the men's game, were likely retired with him. This isn't a big surprise, as the ATP and ITF have made a conscious decision to reward stick-figured nancy boys who like to run around all day, more reminiscent of 1970s WTA moonball tennis than anything else.

Don't get me started on the two-handed backhand.

A man after my own heart. 8)

Whenever I play a match, I declare the point to be over whenever I hit a ball that would have been a winner had my opponent not been camped ten feet behind the baseline. I then triple fist pump and perform pelvic thrusts toward the sky.

Semi-Pro
09-16-2012, 11:33 AM
http://i978.photobucket.com/albums/ae262/Riggpoppa/m8390y.gif

smoledman
09-16-2012, 11:36 AM
OP must be sarcastic. The idea that running down drop shots or going for good returns is somehow stupid? So when Federer runs down a drop shot and turns it into a fantastic winner should we condemn him for that? Minds wonder.

NadalDramaQueen
09-16-2012, 11:43 AM
OP must be sarcastic. The idea that running down drop shots or going for good returns is somehow stupid? So when Federer runs down a drop shot and turns it into a fantastic winner should we condemn him for that? Minds wonder.

http://assets0.ordienetworks.com/images/GifGuide/dancing/boratgroupdance5is.gif

Biscuitmcgriddleson
09-16-2012, 11:54 AM
Well talk to the surface bra, not the strings.

Biscuitmcgriddleson
09-16-2012, 11:58 AM
A man after my own heart. 8)

Whenever I play a match, I declare the point to be over whenever I hit a ball that would have been a winner had my opponent not been camped ten feet behind the baseline. I then triple fist pump and perform pelvic thrusts towards the sky.

You sir, are the definition of sportsmanship all while being a gentleman and a scholar. :)

KineticChain
09-16-2012, 12:18 PM
http://www.threadbombing.com/data/media/2/busey_clapping.gif

rajah84
09-16-2012, 12:51 PM
I think one of the worst consequences of molasses-ized surfaces, polyester strings and beachball tennis balls has to be how it has changed the dynamic of the return game.

I loved how in the 90s, on real surfaces especially, players would simply tank return games. Or they'd just try and go huge on the return and fail 95% of the time. If the returner had to take more than a couple of steps, he'd concede the point. If he was down 40-0 or 40-15 while returning, he'd push the next return out simply to get on with serving. That's the way it is supposed to be. Four points and move on, rinse and repeat; fast forward to the tiebreaker as quickly as possible.

And what's with this nonsense of players putting in effort running down drop shots and retrieving would-be winners and overheads? I was sick of this during the US Open final push-fest. Roddick was one of the few holdouts who consistently refused to run down drop shots. He knew it would cost him some points, but he also knew his manhood would remain intact. Sadly, those values, once widespread in the men's game, were likely retired with him. This isn't a big surprise, as the ATP and ITF have made a conscious decision to reward stick-figured nancy boys who like to run around all day, more reminiscent of 1970s WTA moonball tennis than anything else.

Don't get me started on the two-handed backhand.

I'm actually tempted to agree with parts of this. The part about the would be winners. There's times when I get tired of seeing Murray reach another Federer winner and push it back and end up winning the point.

smoledman
09-16-2012, 12:52 PM
I'm actually tempted to agree with parts of this. The part about the would be winners. There's times when I get tired of seeing Murray reach another Federer winner and push it back and end up winning the point.

We should be angry at Murray for doing that, why? I mean I've cursed Nadal so many times for making Federer hit 4-5 winners to win a single point but that's only made Federer a better player in the end.

rajah84
09-16-2012, 01:07 PM
We should be angry at Murray for doing that, why? I mean I've cursed Nadal so many times for making Federer hit 4-5 winners to win a single point but that's only made Federer a better player in the end.

I agree, it just bugs me at times. I have mixed feelings about how tennis should be played. There's times when I think it should be more about defense (Nadal Murray Djokovic) and times when I prefer a more offensive game, whatever that is. I think Federer is the ideal balance of both. He returns winners with winners and his level of chasing down would be winners is to a lesser degree than the other three guys. Perhaps I'm giving him too much credit. Maybe it has more to do with his style and less his defensive abilities.

Mainad
09-16-2012, 02:00 PM
I'm actually tempted to agree with parts of this. The part about the would be winners. There's times when I get tired of seeing Murray reach another Federer winner and push it back and end up winning the point.

You mean naughty old Murray should just let Federer hit his winners and stop trying to do anything about them? Maybe he should shout a question to Roger if he thinks he's about to go for a winner and if Roger says yes, he should just step aside and let him hit it! :)

I think Federer is ugly enough and tough enough to know what he needs to do when playing Murray. I think he's learnt to cope with him returning his winners by now. :wink:

MichaelNadal
09-16-2012, 02:36 PM
Lol @ the Gifs on the last page.

http://www.gifsoup.com/view5/2442625/michael-s-clap-o.gif

Bowtiesarecool
09-16-2012, 02:38 PM
It's players like this op going ape because their opponent is a pusher, that give me great pleasure when I feel like being a pusher.

CCNM
09-16-2012, 03:09 PM
I think one of the worst consequences of molasses-ized surfaces, polyester strings and beachball tennis balls has to be how it has changed the dynamic of the return game.

I loved how in the 90s, on real surfaces especially, players would simply tank return games. Or they'd just try and go huge on the return and fail 95% of the time. If the returner had to take more than a couple of steps, he'd concede the point. If he was down 40-0 or 40-15 while returning, he'd push the next return out simply to get on with serving. That's the way it is supposed to be. Four points and move on, rinse and repeat; fast forward to the tiebreaker as quickly as possible.

And what's with this nonsense of players putting in effort running down drop shots and retrieving would-be winners and overheads? I was sick of this during the US Open final push-fest. Roddick was one of the few holdouts who consistently refused to run down drop shots. He knew it would cost him some points, but he also knew his manhood would remain intact. Sadly, those values, once widespread in the men's game, were likely retired with him. This isn't a big surprise, as the ATP and ITF have made a conscious decision to reward stick-figured nancy boys who like to run around all day, more reminiscent of 1970s WTA moonball tennis than anything else.

Don't get me started on the two-handed backhand.
I don't play tennis, but anybody who can return a ball with only one hand on the racquet is awesome. The control they must have....:)

Ms Nadal
09-16-2012, 03:36 PM
I don't play tennis, but anybody who can return a ball with only one hand on the racquet is awesome. The control they must have....:)

You're right there. It is a skill to be able to get the ball back into play :). Love watching these great retrievals!

r2473
09-16-2012, 03:46 PM
You must love Isner

TTMR
09-16-2012, 03:55 PM
You must love Isner

Personally, I prefer Karlovic due to his one-handed backhand and abject refusal to trade groundstrokes with inferior players. Isner and Raonic are some of the most exciting players around, but their effeminate two-handers leave a sour taste in my mouth. If Lopez would beef up his serve so he can become an ace machine, and Tsonga would complete the process of disposing of his two-handed backhand, they'd be alright.

Tsonga has one of the best approaches to returning among the non-giants today.

r2473
09-16-2012, 04:04 PM
^^Look man, you don't win a set 70-68 without refusing to try on returns.

Isner will always be GOAT in my book

Mikeplaystenniss
09-16-2012, 04:11 PM
^^Look man, you don't win a set 70-68 without refusing to try on returns.

Isner will always be GOAT in my book

Agreed.

This whole post was interesting. Had some good laughs on the first page from the GIFs.

OP, did you like Michael Chang? ;)

rdis10093
09-16-2012, 04:28 PM
why would you not try to win a point?

TTMR
09-16-2012, 06:52 PM
why would you not try to win a point?

It's not about how many points you win, but when you win them. Great servers often win fewer points than their baseline counterparts, but still frequently win matches in tiebreakers or in one clutch return game. Wasting time and energy trying to win multiple return games is inefficient and taxing. It also betrays a sense of insecurity and vulnerability in your own service game when your opponent sees you are 'trying too much' on his serves. You can't let your opponent gain that mental advantage.

Sid_Vicious
09-16-2012, 06:59 PM
Personally, I prefer Karlovic due to his one-handed backhand and abject refusal to trade groundstrokes with inferior players. Isner and Raonic are some of the most exciting players around, but their effeminate two-handers leave a sour taste in my mouth. If Lopez would beef up his serve so he can become an ace machine, and Tsonga would complete the process of disposing of his two-handed backhand, they'd be alright.

Tsonga has one of the best approaches to returning among the non-giants today.

TTMR, what about Safin and Nalbandian? Surely, their two handed backhands were acceptable due to them being superior talent-wise than Djokovic and Nadal?

Fuji
09-16-2012, 07:03 PM
I think one of the worst consequences of molasses-ized surfaces, polyester strings and beachball tennis balls has to be how it has changed the dynamic of the return game.

I loved how in the 90s, on real surfaces especially, players would simply tank return games. Or they'd just try and go huge on the return and fail 95% of the time. If the returner had to take more than a couple of steps, he'd concede the point. If he was down 40-0 or 40-15 while returning, he'd push the next return out simply to get on with serving. That's the way it is supposed to be. Four points and move on, rinse and repeat; fast forward to the tiebreaker as quickly as possible.

And what's with this nonsense of players putting in effort running down drop shots and retrieving would-be winners and overheads? I was sick of this during the US Open final push-fest. Roddick was one of the few holdouts who consistently refused to run down drop shots. He knew it would cost him some points, but he also knew his manhood would remain intact. Sadly, those values, once widespread in the men's game, were likely retired with him. This isn't a big surprise, as the ATP and ITF have made a conscious decision to reward stick-figured nancy boys who like to run around all day, more reminiscent of 1970s WTA moonball tennis than anything else.

Don't get me started on the two-handed backhand.

http://www.reactiongifs.com/wp-content/gallery/dance-party/running_man.gif

TTMR
09-16-2012, 07:05 PM
TTMR, what about Safin and Nalbandian? Surely, their two handed backhands were acceptable due to them being superior talent-wise than Djokovic and Nadal?

They are honorary one-handers.

rdis10093
09-16-2012, 07:15 PM
It's not about how many points you win, but when you win them. Great servers often win fewer points than their baseline counterparts, but still frequently win matches in tiebreakers or in one clutch return game. Wasting time and energy trying to win multiple return games is inefficient and taxing. It also betrays a sense of insecurity and vulnerability in your own service game when your opponent sees you are 'trying too much' on his serves. You can't let your opponent gain that mental advantage.

perhaps at the weak rec level, but strong players give it all 100% on every point. guys like nadal and hewitt. even college players. If a coach sees a player not trying on a return game, then there will be words hahaha.

Timbo's hopeless slice
09-16-2012, 07:19 PM
masterful, TTMR, even the 'manhood' part went over their idiotic heads

just beautiful

NadalDramaQueen
09-16-2012, 07:23 PM
masterful, TTMR, even the 'manhood' part went over their idiotic heads

just beautiful

Triple fist pump! :)

http://assets0.ordienetworks.com/images/GifGuide/dancing/sytycd-gif1.gif

NLBwell
09-16-2012, 07:59 PM
Hey, back when the tour was all on grass, guys would save their energy if they got down one break. They certainly would if they got down 2 breaks. There were quite a few 6-0 sets.
Of course, each set might go 24-22 before there was a service break.
There might have been a reason to conserve energy.

ninman
09-16-2012, 11:02 PM
If the OP isn't a tennis coach, he should be.

ninman
09-16-2012, 11:03 PM
I think one of the worst consequences of molasses-ized surfaces, polyester strings and beachball tennis balls has to be how it has changed the dynamic of the return game.

I loved how in the 90s, on real surfaces especially, players would simply tank return games. Or they'd just try and go huge on the return and fail 95% of the time. If the returner had to take more than a couple of steps, he'd concede the point. If he was down 40-0 or 40-15 while returning, he'd push the next return out simply to get on with serving. That's the way it is supposed to be. Four points and move on, rinse and repeat; fast forward to the tiebreaker as quickly as possible.

And what's with this nonsense of players putting in effort running down drop shots and retrieving would-be winners and overheads? I was sick of this during the US Open final push-fest. Roddick was one of the few holdouts who consistently refused to run down drop shots. He knew it would cost him some points, but he also knew his manhood would remain intact. Sadly, those values, once widespread in the men's game, were likely retired with him. This isn't a big surprise, as the ATP and ITF have made a conscious decision to reward stick-figured nancy boys who like to run around all day, more reminiscent of 1970s WTA moonball tennis than anything else.

Don't get me started on the two-handed backhand.

But will it blend?

Russeljones
09-16-2012, 11:10 PM
I think one of the worst consequences of molasses-ized surfaces, polyester strings and beachball tennis balls has to be how it has changed the dynamic of the return game.

I loved how in the 90s, on real surfaces especially, players would simply tank return games. Or they'd just try and go huge on the return and fail 95% of the time. If the returner had to take more than a couple of steps, he'd concede the point. If he was down 40-0 or 40-15 while returning, he'd push the next return out simply to get on with serving. That's the way it is supposed to be. Four points and move on, rinse and repeat; fast forward to the tiebreaker as quickly as possible.

And what's with this nonsense of players putting in effort running down drop shots and retrieving would-be winners and overheads? I was sick of this during the US Open final push-fest. Roddick was one of the few holdouts who consistently refused to run down drop shots. He knew it would cost him some points, but he also knew his manhood would remain intact. Sadly, those values, once widespread in the men's game, were likely retired with him. This isn't a big surprise, as the ATP and ITF have made a conscious decision to reward stick-figured nancy boys who like to run around all day, more reminiscent of 1970s WTA moonball tennis than anything else.

Don't get me started on the two-handed backhand.

1/10 for effort and execution.

BreakPoint
09-16-2012, 11:35 PM
I loved it when tennis was nothing but serve-fests, like between Sampras and Ivanisevic, and Sampras and Krajicek, etc. back in the 90's because you have to be big and strong and a real man to be able to hit aces on every other serve. So a tennis match comes down to who can hit more aces to prove who the bigger stud is. :)

Big_Dangerous
09-16-2012, 11:53 PM
I think one of the worst consequences of molasses-ized surfaces, polyester strings and beachball tennis balls has to be how it has changed the dynamic of the return game.

I loved how in the 90s, on real surfaces especially, players would simply tank return games. Or they'd just try and go huge on the return and fail 95% of the time. If the returner had to take more than a couple of steps, he'd concede the point. If he was down 40-0 or 40-15 while returning, he'd push the next return out simply to get on with serving. That's the way it is supposed to be. Four points and move on, rinse and repeat; fast forward to the tiebreaker as quickly as possible.

And what's with this nonsense of players putting in effort running down drop shots and retrieving would-be winners and overheads? I was sick of this during the US Open final push-fest. Roddick was one of the few holdouts who consistently refused to run down drop shots. He knew it would cost him some points, but he also knew his manhood would remain intact. Sadly, those values, once widespread in the men's game, were likely retired with him. This isn't a big surprise, as the ATP and ITF have made a conscious decision to reward stick-figured nancy boys who like to run around all day, more reminiscent of 1970s WTA moonball tennis than anything else.

Don't get me started on the two-handed backhand.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nnzw_i4YmKk

firepanda
09-17-2012, 02:44 AM
Are you serious?

The worst aspect of the game are the 6'10 big servers, who can't hit a shot to save their life. We get to see rallies now. Some people argue they are too long, which is an valid opinion, but watching actual groundstrokes must be preferable to four serves in a row.

I... I'm getting rather angry...

tennisMVP
09-17-2012, 02:49 AM
Nadal manned up the sport of tennis.

RF-17-GOAT
09-17-2012, 03:02 AM
dafuq did i just read?

Tafmatch
09-17-2012, 05:11 AM
Nice rant sir :)

merwy
09-17-2012, 05:32 AM
7/10

You actually made me rage for a good 3 minutes before I realized that you HAVE to be trolling

90's Clay
09-17-2012, 05:41 AM
Dinky tap shot pusher rally's at every slam, all year round regardless of surface is so much fun as well:shock:


Nothing like literally watching the SAME SLAM 4 times a year

NLBwell
09-17-2012, 11:45 AM
But will it blend?

Yeah, you blend.

Mainad
09-17-2012, 01:04 PM
I loved it when tennis was nothing but serve-fests, like between Sampras and Ivanisevic, and Sampras and Krajicek, etc. back in the 90's because you have to be big and strong and a real man to be able to hit aces on every other serve. So a tennis match comes down to who can hit more aces to prove who the bigger stud is. :)

Your signature says it all! :wink:

TTMR
09-17-2012, 01:11 PM
I loved it when tennis was nothing but serve-fests, like between Sampras and Ivanisevic, and Sampras and Krajicek, etc. back in the 90's because you have to be big and strong and a real man to be able to hit aces on every other serve. So a tennis match comes down to who can hit more aces to prove who the bigger stud is. :)

Now here's a guy who gets it.

On a tangential note, I meet a bud of mine for tennis once every couple of months, and we play a few sets but by different rules: The server has to hit an ace, or the point goes to the receiver. If the receiver just gets his racquet on the ball, the server loses the point. This forces the server to 'go big or go home'. I know the chicks who drive by get a kick out of it. You think they'd be impressed if one of us flung over a drop shot? I don't think so.

Anyway, like you said, under these guidelines, the one of us who hits more aces wins the set and gets to be stud for a day. Winner buys the post-match drinks, loser pays for the night at the strip club.

smoledman
09-17-2012, 01:14 PM
This thread makes me ROFL, I bet OP is just dickin' with ya'll.

smoledman
09-17-2012, 01:15 PM
Dinky tap shot pusher rally's at every slam, all year round regardless of surface is so much fun as well:shock:


Nothing like literally watching the SAME SLAM 4 times a year

Explain me what is fun about watching 250 consecutive S&V points.

rajah84
09-17-2012, 01:25 PM
This thread makes me ROFL, I bet OP is just dickin' with ya'll.

I don't know, he'd have to be pretty bored. In another thread he did say his favorite all-time player was Santoro :)

Mainad
09-17-2012, 01:33 PM
Now here's a guy who gets it.

On a tangential note, I meet a bud of mine for tennis once every couple of months, and we play a few sets but by different rules: The server has to hit an ace, or the point goes to the receiver. If the receiver just gets his racquet on the ball, the server loses the point. This forces the server to 'go big or go home'. I know the chicks who drive by get a kick out of it. You think they'd be impressed if one of us flung over a drop shot? I don't think so.

Anyway, like you said, under these guidelines, the one of us who hits more aces wins the set and gets to be stud for a day. Winner buys the post-match drinks, loser pays for the night at the strip club.

Who decides whether its an ace or not? :wink:

BreakPoint
09-17-2012, 01:59 PM
Now here's a guy who gets it.

On a tangential note, I meet a bud of mine for tennis once every couple of months, and we play a few sets but by different rules: The server has to hit an ace, or the point goes to the receiver. If the receiver just gets his racquet on the ball, the server loses the point. This forces the server to 'go big or go home'. I know the chicks who drive by get a kick out of it. You think they'd be impressed if one of us flung over a drop shot? I don't think so.

Anyway, like you said, under these guidelines, the one of us who hits more aces wins the set and gets to be stud for a day. Winner buys the post-match drinks, loser pays for the night at the strip club.
Watching guys like Philippoussis and Becker pound ace after ace is about as good as tennis gets! :)

BreakPoint
09-17-2012, 02:01 PM
Explain me what is fun about watching 250 consecutive S&V points.
Explain to me what is fun about watching 250 consecutive baseline points.

dangalak
09-17-2012, 04:13 PM
Can somebody permaban this loser from this forum please?

Why are you so butthurt about the fact that players actually trying to win a point outright instead of waiting for them to miss are far more popular than the moronic baseline grinders of today?

Look at it this way: The likes of Ivanisevic didn't need hip replacement surgery by the age of 28. :lol:

Also, it was a style possible without PEDs.

dangalak
09-17-2012, 04:19 PM
Dinky tap shot pusher rally's at every slam, all year round regardless of surface is so much fun as well:shock:


Nothing like literally watching the SAME SLAM 4 times a year

Well, if that isn't SetSampras. :)

Well, at least Sampy still has his untarnished night match record. :lol:

jokinla
09-17-2012, 04:21 PM
http://assets0.ordienetworks.com/images/GifGuide/dancing/boratgroupdance5is.gif

NNNNNNNIIIIIIIIICCCCCCCEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

TTMR
09-17-2012, 04:33 PM
If the OP isn't a tennis coach, he should be.

Unfortunately, the only person I coach is my 5 year old son. Right now I've grounded him from tennis and restricted him solely to off-court strength training since he wasn't able to swing the 13 ounce racquet I gave him one-handed. Some low rep, high load resistance work should set him back on the straight and narrow.

dangalak
09-17-2012, 04:41 PM
Unfortunately, the only person I coach is my 5 year old son. Right now I've grounded him from tennis and restricted him solely to off-court strength training since he wasn't able to swing the 13 ounce racquet I gave him one-handed. Some low rep, high load resistance work should set him back on the straight and narrow.

What do you love about uninspired, robotic, cookie cutter tennis. :lol:

Timbo's hopeless slice
09-17-2012, 04:42 PM
Unfortunately, the only person I coach is my 5 year old son. Right now I've grounded him from tennis and restricted him solely to off-court strength training since he wasn't able to swing the 13 ounce racquet I gave him one-handed. Some low rep, high load resistance work should set him back on the straight and narrow.

LOL

and still they take you seriously, I LOVE this place! :)

dangalak
09-17-2012, 04:45 PM
LOL

and still they take you seriously, I LOVE this place! :)

Everybody knows he is trolling. However, he clearly hates people that love diverse and occasionally thoughtful and attacking tennis.

Prisoner of Birth
12-24-2012, 12:37 PM
TTMR knows how it's done. Great job, Sir, hats off.

TTMR, you need to teach sureshs the lost art.

This.

10char

stringertom
12-24-2012, 01:51 PM
OP's thoughts on improving the wow-factor in today's tennis could be adapted to the art of poasting as well...way too much Tolstoyian "yeah, but" responses to pointed rejection of flawed arguments...just move on when you get flamed!

jaggy
12-24-2012, 01:54 PM
Thread delivers like Dominoes

Walenty
12-25-2012, 10:38 AM
Meh. 6/10 may not be trolled again

mattennis
12-25-2012, 11:40 AM
Joking aside, look how different this looks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vITEvisu9m4

They hit so flat (by today's standards) and fast that it looks like a different sport: they try to hit winner shots from the very first strokes of the points.

This is the number of strokes per point in that clip:

3, 2, 3, 1, 1 (this is the first game of the match, Henman serving).
5, 4, 1, 0, 3, 5 (this is the second game of the match, first Agassi serving game).

5, 3, 4, 2, 0, 3, 4, 6 (third game of the match)

10, 3, 11, 1, 4, 1 (fourth game of the match)

3, 5, 0, 1, 1 (fifth game of the match)

?, 1, 2, 5, 1, 3 (sixth game of the match)

4, 1, 0, 3, 6, 11, 1, 1 (this is the seventh game of the match)

2, 9, 3, 1, 2, 3 (eighth game of the match)

2, 9, 1, 0, 3, 2, 5, 1 (ninth game of the match)

1, 3, 1, 1 (tenth and last game of the first set of the match, Agassi won the first set 6-4 )


Not only I prefer their attacking oriented (flatter strokes) game, but the shorter points too.

In that first set, there are:

5 points of 0 strokes (double faults)
18 points of 1 stroke (an ace or unreturnable serve)
7 points of 2 strokes
13 points of 3 strokes
5 points of 4 strokes
6 points of 5 strokes
2 points of 6 strokes
There isn't any point of 7 or 8 strokes
2 points of 9 strokes
1 point of 10 strokes
2 points of 11 strokes.

So, for example, 43 out of 61 points are of 3 or less strokes.

13 out of 61 points are of 4 or 5 or 6 strokes.

Only 5 out of 61 points are of more than 6 strokes.

I like this distribution on hard courts.

I am not saying I hate long rallies all the time, I like it sometimes, for example on clay you expect it and it is okay.

But on hard courts, a 20+ strokes rallies were maybe 5% (or less) of the points, so when it happened it was great, because of the variety (most points were about 1-5 strokes, and suddenly a 10+ rally or 20+ rally was exciting too because you didn't expect it).

But if on every surface (like it happens today) more than 50% of points are 10+ strokes rallies, it starts to get boring.

I wish I had more time to make an statistical study about the distribution of "strokes per point" in many more matches from different eras/players/surfaces.

I am sure the ATP has staff people that have done it already, so they know what they want (what distribution of "strokes per point" is the most appealing to the masses).

NoZak Djokovic
12-25-2012, 02:05 PM
So you want them to tank everyone of their opponents service games ???

TimothyO
12-25-2012, 04:15 PM
NoZak,

Don't take TTMR seriously.

In the past he complained about an opponent who let him beat himself by whacking the ball long repeatedly (he called the opponent a pusher) and he actually blamed his local public parks department for his many losses (they made the courts too slow for him).

You'll notice the common theme in these two examples and his thread here: he's the typical rec player who can't generate his own pace and still control his shots.

He's just sour grapes about not being able to play tennis well.

I feel bad for his kid...

djones
12-25-2012, 04:28 PM
The good old days, some exciting tennis:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pS0j_UHAk3E

Say Chi Sin Lo
12-25-2012, 04:31 PM
The good old days, some exciting tennis:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pS0j_UHAk3E

Good old days as in serving and volleying? Or less than 10 seconds between points?

3fees
12-25-2012, 04:35 PM
Play it out no matter how long it takes....

dennis10is
12-25-2012, 05:36 PM
We all know that it takes a real man only one hand to stroke it.

If his game is small, he can get away with a thumb and a finger.

My balls are too big for me to chase down every drop shots, every lob.

Men's tennis has come full circle to be a bigger version of Harold Solomon and Eddie Dibbs.

DropShotArtist
12-25-2012, 06:29 PM
Poor TTMR, if only his intelligence could match his sarcasm.

egn
12-25-2012, 08:52 PM
OP must be sarcastic. The idea that running down drop shots or going for good returns is somehow stupid? So when Federer runs down a drop shot and turns it into a fantastic winner should we condemn him for that? Minds wonder.

DAMMIT WE ALMOST WENT ONE THREAD WITHOUT MENTIONED ONE OF THEIR NAMES.

Relinquis
12-25-2012, 09:01 PM
great thread.

all joking aside, if the courts get any slower we might as well watch the wta instead. at least the girls grunting is less annoying than when the guys do it.

stringertom
12-25-2012, 09:03 PM
I tried on a return once...it didn't fit so I returned it.

stringertom
12-25-2012, 09:12 PM
great thread.

all joking aside, if the courts get any slower we might as well watch the wta instead. at least the girls grunting is less annoying than when the guys do it.

Sorry, have to disagree there...Shriekapova, NotVerySerena and Azawaila are far more offensive than Gruntollers!

Relinquis
12-25-2012, 09:40 PM
Sorry, have to disagree there...Shriekapova, NotVerySerena and Azawaila are far more offensive than Gruntollers!

yeah, maybe i was getting ahead of myself. i remember seeing a clip of two male pros practising at the US Open i think and you could hear Azarenka's distinctive multi-note wailing in the distance!

I don't really mind Sharapova or Serena's noise as much. Girls tennis has always had it's share of screams. I don't mind as long as they don't sound like wounded animals.

zagor
12-26-2012, 12:08 AM
LOL

and still they take you seriously, I LOVE this place! :)

Well a number of us knows he's trolling, being sarcastic etc. but yeah the number of people who don't get that is surprising.

Regardless, OP has his tennis preference and I have mine, I still prefer the variety 90s had in terms of playing style and conditions regardless.

Ico
06-26-2013, 10:02 AM
Well then, this Federer-Stakhovsky match is for you.

BreakPoint
06-26-2013, 10:16 AM
Well then, this Federer-Stakhovsky match is for you.
I'm loving every minute of it! :)

Best match of the tournament so far, by far!

pjonesy
06-26-2013, 12:37 PM
Fish still biting, left and right.