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View Full Version : can you melt/heat up a graphite crack?


2ndServe
10-26-2012, 07:09 AM
has anyone tried this? I've got a really old prince racket that they don't make anymore and I'd like to try and save it. The problem is that graphite has a very high melting point and I don't have the proper tools for this. Also the crack is under the head guard, which of course isn't made anymore.

jorel
10-26-2012, 07:14 AM
i would try crazy glue inxstead

jorel
10-26-2012, 07:15 AM
or u can try melting and tell us how the puddled mess turns out..;0

db10s
10-26-2012, 07:36 AM
You would need the mold and all sorts of unobtainable tools

Chotobaka
10-26-2012, 07:41 AM
I do not think so. The initial creation of the racquet is based on heat and pressure. Surface damage is better dealt with using something like JB Weld, then sand down and finish as needed. If it is deeper than it appears, nothing can be done to restore original integrity and playability.

UCSF2012
10-26-2012, 08:42 AM
has anyone tried this? I've got a really old prince racket that they don't make anymore and I'd like to try and save it. The problem is that graphite has a very high melting point and I don't have the proper tools for this. Also the crack is under the head guard, which of course isn't made anymore.

Strip the paint, use a propane torch (needle tip flame, use the blue part of the flame), and tell us how it goes.

monomer
10-26-2012, 12:26 PM
You can't melt it. With enough heat it would degrade and burn but not melt. Your best bet is to file a groove or pocket in the crack and fill with epoxy or similar. Even with this, the chance of the repair holding up is probably slim.

db10s
10-26-2012, 01:35 PM
And what racket is it? You said Prince, but which one?

Chotobaka
10-26-2012, 01:45 PM
Strip the paint, use a propane torch (needle tip flame, use the blue part of the flame), and tell us how it goes.


Fun science experiment.:)

LeeD
10-26-2012, 02:04 PM
Most of you, especially #7, got it.
Carbon composites do not melt and magically come back into form. Burning or superheating only weakens the surrounding structure.
Cut a shallow V, use decent epoxy resin with chopped strands of fiberglass and catalyst.

coolblue123
10-26-2012, 02:27 PM
Most of you, especially #7, got it.
Carbon composites do not melt and magically come back into form. Burning or superheating only weakens the surrounding structure.
Cut a shallow V, use decent epoxy resin with chopped strands of fiberglass and catalyst.

+1 learned that from PChem days. Carbon burns, doesn't melt. If you melt anything, it'll be the resin that is mixed with graphite, but once you melt off all the resin, it'll turn into a big black hole.

UCSF2012
10-26-2012, 06:06 PM
Quick internet search: "The melting point of graphite is 3500 c and 6332 f, specific gravity is 2.25, pounds per cubic inch is .812".

I think a torch only goes up to 1600 deg, so you're out of luck.

UCSF2012
10-26-2012, 06:08 PM
Fun science experiment.:)

Every city has a pyro kid somewhere. Let him have fun with this project. Tell him you'll give him $100 if he can melt a tennis racket.