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View Full Version : Users of heavy rackets- do you keep a spare racket in your bag which is lighter?


roundiesee
11-13-2012, 08:15 PM
Would like to ask what is the general consensus regarding keeping a lighter, more manoeuvrable racket in your bag, in case you have an off day with your heavy racket? I was told by my coach that this may not be good as you need to "stick with it" even though you may not be timing the ball well with your heavy stick. Opinions any one?

cluckcluck
11-13-2012, 08:23 PM
Not at all.

The Meat
11-13-2012, 08:25 PM
Actually I keep an even smaller and heavier racquet in my bag to play with if I'm not feeling that great on court. :)

Candide
11-13-2012, 08:32 PM
I have a weighted up (couple of grams in the tip) Organix 10 325 and it never seems heavy to me. My legs may get heavy and my reactions a little dull but it never seems like the racquet is holding me back. I used to play with lighter racquets and I think the whole 'manoeuvrable' thing is way over emphasised. If you use momentum and mechanics to move the racquet then a kid can swing a 12 oz racquet no problemo. I'm 5' 11'', just the wrong side of and an average build by the way. I got rid of the APDs and a Wilson Kobra Tour I had and moved up a big jump in weight but the gain in stability been great. Plus my arm feels far better and I've lifted my game as I can't get away with a six inch backswing.

The light (or very light) racquets seem to for people who are happy to be able to bunt the ball to the end of the court socially but aren't keen to work on their technique for reasons of age or lack of interest - very social players I guess which is fine too. I've see plenty of players who are very proficient with such racquets. But if you're at the stage where you've got a coach who's personally interested in what you're doing I'd get with the program and take his advice. I don't think you'll regret it.

darklore009
11-13-2012, 08:49 PM
nope, it would affect my gameplay. anything lighter will go flying off the court in my case.

Say Chi Sin Lo
11-13-2012, 08:56 PM
No, there's not a racquet that can save you if you're playing like crap.

Fuji
11-13-2012, 09:02 PM
Nope. It's why I always have a matched pair (at least) for serious play. If I'm ahead, and I pop a string I don't want to be out in the dust with a different playing racket.

-Fuji

LanEvo
11-13-2012, 09:57 PM
Nope, currently I own almost all 4 variations of the 2012 PDs, all 4 at one point. I have the regular PD Std. and both the Roddick versions, just picked up the lighter PD recently. I don't like it, will be getting rid of it, but I do not find that it will help you game much to be constantly switching frames like that, only reaosn I have the PDR in Std. and Plus version is that they are somewhat similar, that and I could not find anyone to trade me a PDR+, I enjoy both though, they have their own strengths and weaknesses.

Orion3
11-13-2012, 11:29 PM
At the risk of getting repetitive...NO.

I do have a couple of different matched sets in my bag - one more suited to all court/S&V and one more suited to baseline play. All weigh the same just the balance and head size is slightly different.

sansaephanh
11-14-2012, 12:26 AM
Its the opposite for me as well... Going from a MP to a mid makes me want to do everything right. If I don't I get severely punished. If i don't pick up the pace with my mid, I go back to my main and work even harder.

If all else fails, I accept it as a bad tennis day.

robbo1970
11-14-2012, 01:42 AM
My quick answer is no, I carry two rackets in case of string breaks, both are the same spec. But as hardly any other answers on this thread are just a simple yes or no, then I will say my bit too.

I think the first thing one needs to do is make sure that they are playing with the racket that best suits their game, in terms of weight, head size and balance, then try and stick with it. Its very easy to have a good game one day and think the racket is great, then have a bad day and think you need a new racket.

I have been guilty of this in the past when Ive struggled with a heavy racket, switched to very light and thought it was miles better, only for the next game to get knocked about. Once you have the racket that suits you, try and stick with it.

If you do find yourself struggling with the heavier racket and contemplating carrying a lighter stick, dare I say it might bit a touch too heavy for you.

J011yroger
11-14-2012, 03:40 AM
If I thought there was a racquet that I thought I would play better with, I would use it all the time, not just when I was having a 'bad day'.

The racquets I play with are the ones I think I play best with, every day. Good, bad and medium.

J

pshulam
11-14-2012, 05:20 AM
I do carry a lighter racquet in my bag (just in case if my shoulder hurts and gets tired) but hardly use it.

tyu1314
11-14-2012, 06:27 AM
Big bubba, when i keep framing.:)

jk816
11-14-2012, 09:18 AM
I do carry a lighter racquet in my bag (just in case if my shoulder hurts and gets tired) but hardly use it.

Same here; the only other times I might go lighter (only down from 12.5 to 11.5 oz) is hitting with or teaching my youngest (the heavier racquet has too much plow for her to handle and I can't dial that back much) or friendly mixed doubles (similar reason).

MikeHitsHard93
11-14-2012, 09:28 AM
I have often considered buying a six.one 95 and keeping my pro open for a lighter backup

Xonemains
11-14-2012, 04:58 PM
No, there's not a racquet that can save you if you're playing like crap.


LOL, true, very true:twisted:

nothing can help you then, just whats between your ears

roundiesee
11-14-2012, 05:01 PM
All great answers, thanks every one! :)

sp1derman
11-14-2012, 05:34 PM
Yep I do. Sometimes when I'm consistently late hitting the ball I will switch to the lighter racket. I've had varied success with this the few times I have resorted to it.

db10s
11-14-2012, 05:38 PM
What constitutes "heavy"?

pshulam
11-14-2012, 06:13 PM
What constitutes "heavy"?
Normally in the high 12oz and over.

Bowtiesarecool
11-14-2012, 06:31 PM
My racquets (PS85) are all mass/balance matched. Half with gut at 60, the others with Snakebite at 40. I play gut mostly when I'm out just to socialize, the poly when its moist out or if I need the extra spin.

Timbo's hopeless slice
11-14-2012, 06:41 PM
I found a solution to the fatigue caused by heavy racquets, actually.

1. Find a lighter racquet you play well with.

2. Practice a bit

3. Buy a couple more of the lighter racquets

4. Stick 'em in your bag

5. Take your heavy racquets out of your bag.

6. Sell 'em to a TTer for a reasonable price.

7. Be happy!


hope this helps

db10s
11-14-2012, 06:41 PM
My Bio Max200Gs are at 12.0 (tiny bit of lead in handle) .... And I always seem to have some other frame in there... Right now its an Aero Storm, but it isn't there because its lighter; its just in my bag for some reason...

PKfan1
11-14-2012, 07:01 PM
I do the opposite. I normally play with a lighter (PSLGT 12.5 oz) racquet but switch to a heavier (4d 200T 13.3 oz) one if I am out of energy or being really lazy. I find the heavier one takes a lot less energy to hit the ball hard.

2ManyAces
11-14-2012, 07:27 PM
^^ interesting. I feel totally the opposite lol. Imho

spaceman_spiff
11-15-2012, 02:34 AM
For me, using a lighter frame is more difficult.

I add weight to the upper half of the hoop to increase the size of the sweet spot and stability so that I can use a smooth, short swing (mostly just shoulder turn rather than a lot of arm action) to consistently generate power. That way, even when I hit off center, I can still get decent pace and depth.

If I were to switch to a lighter frame, I'd have to use longer, whippier swings and hit a smaller sweet spot in order to generate the same amount of power. So, if I am having a bad day, switching to a lighter frame would just make things worse, especially on my backhand (when I just hit around with someone else's frame, I switch to a one-hander because I can't get enough swing speed with two hands to get the power I want).

robbo1970
11-15-2012, 03:49 AM
I would think that switching to a racket considerably lighter or heavier part way through a game can't be too good for the body.

Purely because the speed at which you swing is going to be vastly different and whilst going lighter is easier on the overall muscles and manouvrability, it could cause strains in other ways. Just my thought.

I can see why having a lighter racket can help with fatigue, but going too much lighter could have some negative effects on the shoulder/elbow etc.

I do also see the point when one is playing an opponent that is perhaps a real beginner or just not that good and using a racket that hits a heavier ball is really necessary, so having a play about with a different racket can just keep it fun and a bit interesting, to make more of a game of it, even though the outcome is inevitable. I've actually got an oversize Prince racket that is a about 15g lighter than my 300 that I have thought might be fun to have a ping about with sometime.

UCSF2012
11-15-2012, 09:32 AM
Do you? Or should you?

It's not that bad an idea to have multiple frames in your bag. Switching among them is fairly easy, and I do it all the time. Morning tennis is different from evening tennis, as my energy level is completely different.

Silicone in handle Prestige Pro IG in the morning (12.7oz). Leaded Wilsons in the afternoons and evenings (12.9-13.0oz).

bluetrain4
11-15-2012, 01:28 PM
I have had by chance lighter racquets in my bag (simply different racquets that weren't my main racquets at the time), but never for the acute purpose of having something available that was lighter should my heavier stick become too cumbersome.

Having said that, I think I actually could switch to a lighter frame during play if I felt I would benefit, as long as it's a lighter frame I liked and wasn't drastically lighter. After years of being a spec junkie and obsessing about little details, I've realized I can play good tennis with a fairly wide variety of frames. Of course I have preferences, but overally I can adjust if need be, or simply just to try new stuff out or revisit old friends.

Also, as someone up thread stated, sometimes it actually helps to have a heavier, more substantial racquet as relief rather than a lighter one, if things are somewhat out of control. Offers more stability, enables you to simplify things, shorten strokes.

martini1
11-15-2012, 05:51 PM
Actually you want something similar if not equal in weight. But you can get something slightly larger in head size or more powerful to compensate something.

Being more maneuverable or not probably more important to playing singles or doubles.

movdqa
11-15-2012, 06:01 PM
I did this with my previous set of racquets. It was useful for different environments (indoors vs outdoors, clay vs hardcourts). They were the same frame, with variance of 0.1 oz stock at 12.8, 12.9, 13.0, 13.1 ounces. In general, I didn't switch racquets.

My current set is matched but my stringer unfortunately put something different in and the weight is different so it was a bit frustrating hitting with it. I got the other one strung and that's been fine but I had to do something on the one with the different strings.

I keep a pack or two of lead tape in my bag and can just add or remove lead tape if I want to fine-tune on the court.

db10s
11-15-2012, 06:21 PM
I did this with my previous set of racquets. It was useful for different environments (indoors vs outdoors, clay vs hardcourts). They were the same frame, with variance of 0.1 oz stock at 12.8, 12.9, 13.0, 13.1 ounces. In general, I didn't switch racquets.

My current set is matched but my stringer unfortunately put something different in and the weight is different so it was a bit frustrating hitting with it. I got the other one strung and that's been fine but I had to do something on the one with the different strings.

I keep a pack or two of lead tape in my bag and can just add or remove lead tape if I want to fine-tune on the court.

For some reason I'm doubting that you can feel a difference. I'm not saying that you can't, I'm just skeptical.

movdqa
11-15-2012, 06:37 PM
> For some reason I'm doubting that you can feel a difference.
> I'm not saying that you can't, I'm just skeptical.

Which difference?

Between 12.8, 12.9, 13.0 and 13.1 ounces?

The difference between poly and copoly strings?

The difference between the weights of strings?

The difference with a few grams of lead?

db10s
11-15-2012, 06:40 PM
> For some reason I'm doubting that you can feel a difference.
> I'm not saying that you can't, I'm just skeptical.

Which difference?

Between 12.8, 12.9, 13.0 and 13.1 ounces?

The difference between poly and copoly strings?

The difference between the weights of strings?

The difference with a few grams of lead?

I should have been clearer.... 12.8 and 12.9 etc...

J011yroger
11-15-2012, 06:46 PM
I should have been clearer.... 12.8 and 12.9 etc...

Come now, surely everyone can tell the difference in weight between a dry racquet, and one with a sweaty overgrip.

Lol.

J

movdqa
11-15-2012, 07:52 PM
> Come now, surely everyone can tell the difference in weight
> between a dry racquet, and one with a sweaty overgrip.

You put your overgrips at 12:00?

xFullCourtTenniSx
11-15-2012, 09:56 PM
Would like to ask what is the general consensus regarding keeping a lighter, more manoeuvrable racket in your bag, in case you have an off day with your heavy racket? I was told by my coach that this may not be good as you need to "stick with it" even though you may not be timing the ball well with your heavy stick. Opinions any one?

Yeah... I'm carrying around a lighter racket... But it's still 12.6 ounces... But I was considering switching to something a bit lighter... Still thinking quite a bit about it. My heavier racket seems to play better though. :/

For reference, my normal racket is 12.9-13.0 ounces. Don't remember the exact 4th digit. The 12.6 ounce racket is a relatively standard-weighted BLX Six.One Tour with an overgrip and Natural Gut/Luxilon strings.

fuzz nation
11-16-2012, 06:06 AM
I do the opposite. I normally play with a lighter (PSLGT 12.5 oz) racquet but switch to a heavier (4d 200T 13.3 oz) one if I am out of energy or being really lazy. I find the heavier one takes a lot less energy to hit the ball hard.

I quoted this because it's also happened to me. Sometimes I'm "off" in one way or another and switching to a different frame can effectively reset my synapses a little bit. I've switched to a slightly lighter frame a few times, but I've switched to a heavier option, too. An alternative racquet doesn't necessarily need to be significantly different to be plenty useful, I think.

Sure, I have my go-to frames, but I have a few different ones that I also like a LOT for one aspect or another. Sometimes if I'm not clicking, grabbing a different racquet out of the bag can jolt my awareness or timing so that I might feel a little more functional on the courts. While I don't do this constantly and I also understand that hitting the ball well is about me and not the racquet, I've definitely felt better here and there after making a mid-outing racquet switch.

tball
11-16-2012, 11:02 AM
I do.

For 1 hour match, I do not use it. But when a match starts going over 2 hours, I have to switch to a lighter racquet, or I'll start losing badly.

Interestingly, none of my opponents do this, and I can see them visibly struggling, getting slower and slower, and not being able to swing in a timely manner. They just punt the ball back to me, with no force or direction.

The only people I have trouble with, are the ones that start out with Head Exteme... Those are hard to crack, as they do not yield as the time goes on.

robbo1970
11-19-2012, 08:16 AM
This thread is very interesting.

I have three rackets, that are about 10/15g difference in weight, head sizes from 105/100/98 and with corresponding increases in swingweight as the head gets smaller.

Over the weekend I re-gripped the 105 with leather, the same as the other two and over the course of one singles match and 3 single set doubles matches in the same day, I transitioned from the heaviest to the lightest and I have to say it was great. Putting the leather grip on these rackets does give them a more solid feel, but I think as fatigue set in, I didnt need to swing harder to get the same level or even slightly more power from my shots, with what felt like less effort. I think if I was to start with the lightest I would need to adjust to reign in that extra power, but apart from that, it wasnt too difficult.

Plus, the real positive is that I now get some use out of my rackets without impacting my game.

TheLambsheadrep
11-19-2012, 02:14 PM
I keep one in there... for other people that I don't want using my racquets :P

HEADfamilydynasty
11-19-2012, 02:24 PM
Heavy all the way.
13oz, 13oz , 13.1oz.

HEADfamilydynasty
11-19-2012, 02:26 PM
I keep one in there... for other people that I don't want using my racquets :P

+1
Especially when they then proceed to abuse it like the racket they just BROKE!:evil:

movdqa
11-19-2012, 02:42 PM
I loaned out one of my pro stocks and the other person knew it was such and didn't take the best of care of it. These days, I just bring my tgk238.4s and they are XL and weigh a ton - most people don't care to try them out. I think that most people don't particularly care to hit with a Prestige either.

This should be another topic: what have other people done to your racquets that they borrowed from you?

TheLambsheadrep
11-19-2012, 05:26 PM
+1
Especially when they then proceed to abuse it like the racket they just BROKE!:evil:

I had a college roommate scuff my bumper guard (through the protection tape) on the ground out of frustration, that was the last time he used one of my racquets haha. it irks me even when someone just taps my racquet against the net tape. I go out of my way to make sure I don't damage my racquets, I expect the same from everyone else! :P

pkshooter
11-19-2012, 06:26 PM
Actually I keep an even smaller and heavier racquet in my bag to play with if I'm not feeling that great on court. :)

+1
Don't know if the above is a troll but if I'm really not hitting through the ball, I'll break out my woodie; which is heavy plus head heavy, so the weight will take the racket through.