PDA

View Full Version : are low-powered racquets better for developing your strokes?


barnes1172
11-20-2012, 11:37 AM
This occurred to me when I was watching a friend hit with the Wilson K90 6.1. He has very long fast strokes, good extension, and steps into the ball to drive his groundstrokes. He actually has the best strokes of the people I play with and watch locally.

When I play with a tweener type frame, I feel like I cannot let loose on my swings. I am a 4.0 guy.

Can anyone suggest another low-powered racquet that fits in this mold? I am currently using the Dunlop Aerogel 4D 300.

mrmike
11-20-2012, 11:47 AM
That new Wilson Blade 93 looks mighty sweet. But then again, you could just alter your setup on the Dunlop with either more tension, or a stiffer string type to see how that works out before going to a different frame.

robbo1970
11-20-2012, 12:38 PM
I think the answer to your question is yes. As you allude to, you can hit with more force and still keep the ball in.

Good idea though to try a higher tension with your 300, im a Bio 300 user and its very versatile with a different tension set up.

Orion3
11-20-2012, 01:21 PM
Pure Storm ltd GT for one

Power Player
11-20-2012, 01:30 PM
Low powered sticks are awesome, but you will get beat a lot while developing due to short balls being much more common.

I like the happy medium, players tweener type sticks. I always come back to those.

SteveI
11-20-2012, 01:34 PM
Low powered sticks are awesome, but you will get beat a lot while developing due to short balls being much more common.

I like the happy medium, players tweener type sticks. I always come back to those.

Frames like Dunlop 400 Tour, Wilson BLX Pro Open.. PK 5G series

pkshooter
11-20-2012, 01:56 PM
Dunlop Aerogel 200 or 100? the 100 is nice and cheap, i just bought myself two.

Maui19
11-20-2012, 02:42 PM
Interesting question. I tend to like low-powered sticks even though I am not a powerful hitter. I should be playing something more powerful, but I've just never liked those racquets for some reason. I just got a new racquet, and after reading the label about the kind of player it is designed for, I'm having second thoughts. But I'm sure it will be fine.

MikeHitsHard93
11-20-2012, 02:44 PM
Interesting question. I tend to like low-powered sticks even though I am not a powerful hitter. I should be playing something more powerful, but I've just never liked those racquets for some reason. I just got a new racquet, and after reading the label about the kind of player it is designed for, I'm having second thoughts. But I'm sure it will be fine.

What is it?

makinao
11-21-2012, 02:42 AM
My experience with so called "low" and "high" powered racquets is reversed. For a long time I used what could be called classic thin beam, heavy, flexy, head-light "low" powered racquets and could hit as hard and long as I wanted with my medium-length but fast swing. Then I changed to what was supposedly a "powerful" tweener racquet, a Pure Drive + Cortex. Suddenly all my shots became short and wimpy, and I had problems returning heavy balls. Even my serve and overheads lost their sting. I'm now back to a Head Radical OS Limited Edition, which people have called "low powered". Since I bought it a month ago I have not only won all my games, but I've done so by forceful, penetrating hitting which bully opponents in my same class into submission.

I can't figure out what in my swing works only with classic low-power racquets, and is mysteriously not made for high power tweeners. So I can't understand why most people consider many tweeners powerful. Can anyone explain this?

TimothyO
11-21-2012, 04:41 AM
OP is correct.

The reason powerful frames exist is so you DON'T have to use proper form. Just tap the ball using your wrist, forearm, and elbow and the ball goes very deep over the net. In fact, I've noticed that many rec player simply play table tennis on a huge table top. This vastly expands the market for tennis products. Anyone can pickup a powerful frame and start tapping the ball over the net.

The downside is that these frames make it far more difficult to control the ball using proper, full strokes. It's too easy to hit the ball long. So using these wristy strokes means lots of inconsistency...and tennis elbow.

ATP100
11-21-2012, 06:55 AM
are low-powered racquets better for developing your strokes?




Easy Answer: Yes

samarai
11-21-2012, 07:02 AM
Recently switched from pure drives to Dunlop bio 400, and I can honestly say my game has improved dramatically. After playing with this stck for 2 weeks, my partners have even commented on the improvement. Serves improved, forehand just has a lot more zip, backhand has way more pace. Didn't realize a switch in stick would add so much more confidence to the game. 3.5 player able to rally and play, even take games from 4.0 players now.

fuzz nation
11-21-2012, 07:18 AM
OP is correct.

The reason powerful frames exist is so you DON'T have to use proper form. Just tap the ball using your wrist, forearm, and elbow and the ball goes very deep over the net. In fact, I've noticed that many rec player simply play table tennis on a huge table top. This vastly expands the market for tennis products. Anyone can pickup a powerful frame and start tapping the ball over the net.

The downside is that these frames make it far more difficult to control the ball using proper, full strokes. It's too easy to hit the ball long. So using these wristy strokes means lots of inconsistency...and tennis elbow.

Good answer I think.

The tricky issue with labeling a racquet as "low powered" is that it's hard to know just what that means. I find that softer racquets have less "pop", but lighter racquets, soft or stiff, can have a diminished capacity to really thump the ball, even with a full stroke. Blah-blah-blah... enough about me.

I've had GREAT success with using very heavy and also very soft LM Prestige mids as sort of training frames. I took up with these a few years back when I was really rebuilding my ground strokes and immediately found out how much my mechanics were lacking when I tried to play with these for more than 15 or 20 minutes. My arm and shoulder would quickly wear out, so I obviously had to get better timing and a proper kinetic chain working in my favor to use these "low powered" racquets with any success.

It wasn't easy, but at least for me, it was necessary and also quite valuable for my development. I needed about two months of deliberate work to improve the leg drive and core rotation that I now use with my shots and still like to get those racquets out now and then for personal maintenance. Sure, good mechanics can be learned without swinging a low-powered frame around, but I believe there's a big advantage to learning good habits with a racquet that can only produce good shots with good timing and a more complete stroke.

SteveI
11-25-2012, 01:45 PM
Recently switched from pure drives to Dunlop bio 400, and I can honestly say my game has improved dramatically. After playing with this stck for 2 weeks, my partners have even commented on the improvement. Serves improved, forehand just has a lot more zip, backhand has way more pace. Didn't realize a switch in stick would add so much more confidence to the game. 3.5 player able to rally and play, even take games from 4.0 players now.

The 400 Tour is not really a tweener ..it is in the class of the light players frames. Another one being a PK 5G. Both frames are 8-9 points HL and very close to 12 oz. Both offer a nice balance of power and control. You need to have decent strokes to get the most out of these.. but the lower swing weight and 100 headsize make the frame a bit more user friendly for the 3.5 to 4.5 user. While using a true players frame is wonderful to develope strokes, you still have to have "the goods" to win with them. If you do not have great footwork, fast hands and good strokes.. taking a true players frame into matchplay might put you at a disadvantage. There is a reason TW lists it frames with a user rating. The short answer is yes.. low powered frame are better for grooving your strokes.

BTW.. I use the 400 Tour and it is very nice frame..

gplracer
11-25-2012, 02:38 PM
Have you thought about stringing your racket tighter?

NLBwell
11-25-2012, 03:03 PM
Remember "Low Powered" rackets are high powered rackets and "High Powered" rackets are often low powered rackets.

Since, for a given swing speed, weight adds a lot to power, rackets like the 6.1 95, which is pretty stiff and heavier than most are the most powerful rackets. Many light stiffer rackets actually have less power available if you have a decent swing.
Having a racket where you can take a decent swing at the ball and not poke it out will definitely help your strokes.

sansaephanh
11-25-2012, 03:34 PM
I think finding the perfect tension with any given string/racket combo is essential.

Had to string multi/synthetics@ 64 in my RDiS 200's before i could start swinging out on them in my own comfort zone. Polys had to be around 56-58.

thecrusher956
11-25-2012, 03:53 PM
I think the answer is yes. I've used "high" powered racquets and they respond badly to correct strokes. If you have the strokes and the power yourself, that low-powered racquets will really work for you.

gplracer
11-25-2012, 06:52 PM
Some might consider my 6.1 95 to be a low powered racket. That is only because it is a heavy racket and they do not have the strokes to swing it. Some tweeners to me have no power because they have no weight....

parasailing
11-27-2012, 10:33 PM
I agree with what people have posted about the tweener racquets. You can get away with some much just by tapping the ball over and I think most rec. players love the instant gratification of playing so well with them without realizing they are using the proper technique.

Once bad habits set it, it's really difficult to correct not to mention you will probably play worse before you get better using a more proper hitting technique.

tennis_balla
11-27-2012, 10:41 PM
If you're developing as a player you'll want a racket you'll grow into so to speak. Something that's comfortable to play with but allows you to freely swing through the ball and develop your strokes. As a coach I've seen too many players using too powerful rackets which hindered their game.
For each player it's different what racket will work for them, but as a general rule I believe in using as heavy and low powered as you can handle.

TimothyO
11-28-2012, 04:52 AM
If you're developing as a player you'll want a racket you'll grow into so to speak. Something that's comfortable to play with but allows you to freely swing through the ball and develop your strokes. As a coach I've seen too many players using too powerful rackets which hindered their game.
For each player it's different what racket will work for them, but as a general rule I believe in using as heavy and low powered as you can handle.

This^^^^!

My 11 year old just switched to the AG 4D 300 Tour (around 11.4 oz with an OG and bit of lead at 9/3). He had been using the BLX Surge 2012. He loves the frame's low power as he does what he's supposed to: full smooth stroke with full shoulder turn. The 300T is very precise and supports tons of spin. One of his favorite shots is a slice drop shot that just dies on the court. Even at 11.4 oz he gets tons of action on the ball and he's small for his age. He's hitting with more confidence than ever before.

He also enjoyed my 200 18x20s but they were still just a little too much for him one serve. But I can see him using them in a year or two.

hawk eye
11-28-2012, 06:54 AM
Lots of ATP and WTA players use so called tweeners like pure drive, areo pro drive, BLX pro open. And you can't say they're just tapping the ball over the net. So it makes no sense you can't swing the ball in a technically correct way with those. Some players just prefer bigger sweet spots and lower weight.
But it's not like playing a head heavy 250 gram 115 sq inch stick.

hawk eye
11-28-2012, 06:59 AM
And they're not all paint jobs..

goran_ace
11-28-2012, 07:30 AM
At my club, you're much more likely to see the hardcore players sticks in the hands of high school kids and 3.5-4.0 men than in the higher level players. They need a low powered racket to keep the ball in the court because their swings are a little wild. The 4.5-5.0 players tend to play with something more user-friendly like a tweener stick because they already have well developed, controlled strokes and are thus able to use the extra stiffness/power to their advantage. That said, Pure drives and tweeners are used by people of every age, level, and gender.

Marcus2137
11-28-2012, 07:28 PM
One of the best steps for me was when I found a nice deal on a pretty Prestige a while back and went from my lightweight, head-heavy tweener to the Prestige.

I struggled for a long time and even put the Prestige up for sale. But then it started clicking and suddenly I realized that I couldn't swing it the same way I used to swing my tweener.

My game has definitely developed because of the Prestige. Now that I've zero'd in on good proper swings, I'm ok picking up higher power tweener frames and playing with them.

So I think the arguement between: lower power racket helps you develop your swings vs. pro's still use tweeners and they play fine, is pretty Apples vs Oranges.

Pro's swings are developed, they can pick up almost any racket in the world and adjust to it within a few hits. Just like before, I could only play with my one tweener racket, but now, I have a range of rackets and try friends rackets. There are still rackets that give me some problems, but overall, I can take any racket and swing it well... because my strokes have been developed.

So for me:
-At first tweener gave nice power and easy to swing=good results/power without good swings.
-Then, a players racket made me struggle but eventually developed my strokes.
-Now, I can play with players rackets for control or pick up a tweener and enjoy the power, but still with much better strokes, control, and consistency than before.

Marcus2137
11-28-2012, 07:37 PM
At my club, you're much more likely to see the hardcore players sticks in the hands of high school kids and 3.5-4.0 men than in the higher level players. They need a low powered racket to keep the ball in the court because their swings are a little wild. The 4.5-5.0 players tend to play with something more user-friendly like a tweener stick because they already have well developed, controlled strokes and are thus able to use the extra stiffness/power to their advantage. That said, Pure drives and tweeners are used by people of every age, level, and gender.

Ya, I've been doing some casually friendly teaching for some friends and for my wife and I find that many beginners have the same issue of blasting balls to the back fence. I've never had a beginner who swings too slow and hits the ball but it doesn't go over the net. No... they all swing too hard on most shots and blast everything. So I strung my wife's racket tighter with a lower power string. Once, I was demoing a Wilson PS85 just for the fun of it, and I handed it to my wife. She played the best tennis she's ever played with that racket instead of her 115" beginner racket, until her arm was tired after 10 minutes and switched back to her lightweight racket.

That being said, I don't personally find a huge power difference between something like a Prestige Pro and Babolat Pure Drive. The Babolat stiffness and larger head inherently gives more power, but the Prestige Pro is heavier/has higher swing weight and more plowthrough and seems to push the ball farther.

I'd say it would be hard to develop strokes with a 115" 270g racket, but with a 100" 315-320g racket, I have no doubt someone could develop nice strokes, and wouldn't say they need to move to a 340g 95" 18x20 in order to improve in tennis.

FedMex
12-30-2012, 01:22 AM
I've hit with the RDS001 mid (90") for 4 years and I feel like my technique if finally where I want it to be. I can top balls 4 or 5 feet over the net as easily as I can hit 2 to 3' over which is my natural shot. I play with Fed's grip on forehand and have a similar backhand motion as his. In the last year, my footwork has really improved, shortened my take back to hit out in front on forehand and i'm now jumping on any ball I can to hit off the front foot.

When I rally and hit relaxed, I've hit with 6.0 players and D3 college players. That said, my match play is terrible and through playing pushers realized my footwork lacked adjustment steps and my mind mental patience. I've used the RDS 001 to really learn to use my legs and hit most modern footwork moves. I can now hit comfortably with BLX PS 90 and on indoor it's killer.

That said, I'm still having problems with spinny advanced players who hit balls above my shoulder. Tonight, I tried the new APD and 2012 PDR and I killed a guy. I was surprised how my technique adjusted to these racquets easily and I can generate all the power I need off a long and fast swing mind you. I felt a type of control on angled baseline shots that I can't get unless I'm really on with a Fed type 90" racquet. That said, I'm less inspired to go to net unless my approach is excellent given less feel that I have for half volleys and hard volleys (soft floater volleys are easy on the babolats as well, just put your racquet out and guide).

The harder and deeper baseline had my opponents on their back foot more and with that I could approach deep and with the better angles to the corners. THat forced easier volleys. Put aways from mid court I could do with less perfect timing using just my arm at times with my hips facing the net.

I could see how using the Bab's would make me a less mechanically correct player over time, so I'll keep training with my RDS 001 and prostaff and use the babolat's for tournaments and league matches esp with advanced spinny players. I honestly think I'll win many more matches instead of giving my opponents a 10 sq in advantage in headsize and spin potential that I have to think alot about. Incidentally, hitting off the front foot with Babolats produced a bullet from the PDR and definitely more arc from the APD. I also found I could catch the balls late more consistently on the forehand and buggy whip easily. Loopy shots to the corners or service box were much easier than with a prostaff. I think Fed would win another grand slam or 2 with a Babolat, easily.

In sum, going from a control 90" racquet to Babolat improves your game and is not a hard switch (for me), but once I got used or get used to the Bab's, it takes awhile to get the mechanics clean again on a 90" low power (hitting out in front more, using legs, not cheating with arm only).

ryydman
12-30-2012, 02:03 AM
I've hit with the RDS001 mid (90") for 4 years and I feel like my technique if finally where I want it to be. I can top balls 4 or 5 feet over the net as easily as I can hit 2 to 3' over which is my natural shot. I play with Fed's grip on forehand and have a similar backhand motion as his. In the last year, my footwork has really improved, shortened my take back to hit out in front on forehand and i'm now jumping on any ball I can to hit off the front foot.

When I rally and hit relaxed, I've hit with 6.0 players and D3 college players. That said, my match play is terrible and through playing pushers realized my footwork lacked adjustment steps and my mind mental patience. I've used the RDS 001 to really learn to use my legs and hit most modern footwork moves. I can now hit comfortably with BLX PS 90 and on indoor it's killer.

That said, I'm still having problems with spinny advanced players who hit balls above my shoulder. Tonight, I tried the new APD and 2012 PDR and I killed a guy. I was surprised how my technique adjusted to these racquets easily and I can generate all the power I need off a long and fast swing mind you. I felt a type of control on angled baseline shots that I can't get unless I'm really on with a Fed type 90" racquet. That said, I'm less inspired to go to net unless my approach is excellent given less feel that I have for half volleys and hard volleys (soft floater volleys are easy on the babolats as well, just put your racquet out and guide).

The harder and deeper baseline had my opponents on their back foot more and with that I could approach deep and with the better angles to the corners. THat forced easier volleys. Put aways from mid court I could do with less perfect timing using just my arm at times with my hips facing the net.

I could see how using the Bab's would make me a less mechanically correct player over time, so I'll keep training with my RDS 001 and prostaff and use the babolat's for tournaments and league matches esp with advanced spinny players. I honestly think I'll win many more matches instead of giving my opponents a 10 sq in advantage in headsize and spin potential that I have to think alot about. Incidentally, hitting off the front foot with Babolats produced a bullet from the PDR and definitely more arc from the APD. I also found I could catch the balls late more consistently on the forehand and buggy whip easily. Loopy shots to the corners or service box were much easier than with a prostaff. I think Fed would win another grand slam or 2 with a Babolat, easily.

In sum, going from a control 90" racquet to Babolat improves your game and is not a hard switch (for me), but once I got used or get used to the Bab's, it takes awhile to get the mechanics clean again on a 90" low power (hitting out in front more, using legs, not cheating with arm only).

Super post, great read. I'd like to see Federer spank Rafa in the Wimby Final using a Pure Drive Roddick, with Andy Roddick as his coach....:twisted:

rst
12-30-2012, 03:39 AM
i had swung a dunlop 4d 200 tour for awhile...is 12.5 ounces and has somehtin like 345 swingweight and stifness rating at about 58 or 60.....TW claims its power level is low. i am not sure what they mean by this. TW says a fast swing speed is needed???

i can say that when i practiced against a wall the 4d 200tour made the balls pop off and echo louder than when i hit with my 10.8 ounce donnay x-yellow without what seemd to be any significant extra effort.the strokes were more measured and flowing where i tend to whip and snap the lighter donnay racket.

but i found the donnay better for me on defence and chipping and chopping into forehands.

an easy short ball should be put away with nearly any racket.

medium paced shots can be dished back across the court with the heavy dunlop with noticalbe zip. i found that the 10.8 ounce sub 300 SWeight donnay helped me better when i was really pressed or pulled out wide and having to defend or reflex a shot back over the net....and im getting older (40s).

but if your shots are going over and generally where you wqant them that is the techniqe that works.

rst
12-30-2012, 03:44 AM
even on serve the 4d 200 tour with a slower measured motion could blast the tennis ball into the service court....the balance of the 12.6 ounces leant itself to a pounding flat-skiddy serve.

i can get a little more english on the ball with the lighter donnay
and by keeping strings loose, similar velocity.

pshulam
12-30-2012, 08:20 AM
I normally use i.prestige mid for practices and PT280 for matches.

IA-SteveB
12-30-2012, 09:13 AM
Pure Storm ltd GT for one

I have been using this racquet for a few days and I played really well with it. My mind wants me to swing hard and this frame allows me to do so. Playing with my Pure Drive handcuffed me a bit because I get gunshy with it. My strokes are far from great and I rely on athleticism to put the strings on the ball. Never had a lesson and probably should!

pshulam
12-30-2012, 09:41 AM
Never had a lesson and probably should!
A couple of private sessions with a tennis pro can definitely improve your skills. The problem is cost - $60 to $80 per hour. Group lessons or drills (about $20) are more reasonable though less effective.

canny
12-30-2012, 09:46 AM
Oh definitely. On are highschool tennis team. The less developed players using tweener/high power frames we joke around and say they need "more wrist" when their shots are short or hit the net.

I myself prefer low-powered racquets. I prefer driving the ball into the court with my own power. Only thing is I had to switch to a two handed backhand because I havent take the time to develop proper form to get a non-sitter/short one handed backhand.

anubis
12-30-2012, 10:11 AM
I would say that low powered racquets are really the only option for anyone if all they are concerned with is keeping the ball in play. I'm not talking about pushing, I mean if you want to consistently take a fast cut at the ball, add plenty of pace and spin and STILL keep the ball in play, then unless you have FLAWLESS technique, you're better off with a low powered racquet.

Using high powered racquets require such perfect timing and huge amounts of spin to keep the ball in play (or a very slow swing speed).

For me, I just want to always swing hard and fast at the ball and have it still stay in play. That's why I use low powered racuqets. I absolutely hate having to slow down my swing speed for any reason (except for net volley play).

When I was using Pure Drives, 90% of all of my groundstrokes sailed long. 90%! Now that I use Prestiges, 90% stay in... and I haven't modified my swing speed at all.

deco0028
12-30-2012, 10:12 AM
even on serve the 4d 200 tour with a slower measured motion could blast the tennis ball into the service court....the balance of the 12.6 ounces leant itself to a pounding flat-skiddy serve.

i can get a little more english on the ball with the lighter donnay
and by keeping strings loose, similar velocity.

Hi
I have been playing for just over a year, and have tried many racquets, mostly the ones my sons have rotated through. I wander away from the Dunlop 4D 200 Tour occasionally, but always come back due to its plowthrough and control. The only issue is the lack of topspin with a setup of 16G(1.30mm) natty gut mains, and a 1.25mm poly in the crosses, strung at 56/51 lbs. it is most likely technical, but I get much more topspin and hence control with a Volkl PB 8 315 with a similar string setup, or a BLX Pro Open with multifilament 17G strings. The weight of the Dunlop could be a factor to reduced RHS, or perhaps the thicker strings do not give as much topspin.
My point is the Dunlop does force me to concentrate more on a brush up technique or the balls will go long, but the larger head size racquets are more forgiving. Perhaps initially training with an 18 x 20 racquet with a weight that is not overly heavy may be the way to go to develop good topspin and slice, because once that good swinging arc (along with the necessary footwork and loading/unloading)is developed, you can swing with a racquet in any string pattern effectively. Oh, and always headlight for proper development.

Bagumbawalla
12-30-2012, 10:30 AM
Basically, yes- in the sense that you must have (or develop) better strokes to usr the low-powered racket. Having said that, the same would be true (to an even greater extent) in using an old wood racket. Most people, however, would not want to use a wood racket as their main racket. For the same reason not everyone should use a low powered racket- and should try to find something that suits their ability, style, age, mobility, swing speed and so on.

Radical7
12-30-2012, 10:45 AM
I would say no, strokes tend to break down when you are hitting out of your comfort zone. By having a powerful racquet you can worry less about the depth or speed of your shots and focus more on technique. Also, by using a more powerful, you don't have to use as much energy on each shot, so you don't get tired as quickly.

sundaypunch
12-30-2012, 01:09 PM
There is nothing inherently bad about a Pure Drive (or similar racquet). The fact that a lot of hacks can get a way with using them means nothing. There have been hacks with bad form in every era with every style of racquet.

To me, the Pure Drive is a great choice for a baseliner that takes big rips at the ball with heavy topspin. If your arm can handle one with full poly, even better. It's an incredibly popular racquet with many high level players for this reason.

It's fine if this doesn't fit your game. To say that it will limit someone from improving or becoming a good player is ridiculous.

ohcaptain
12-30-2012, 01:50 PM
This occurred to me when I was watching a friend hit with the Wilson K90 6.1. He has very long fast strokes, good extension, and steps into the ball to drive his groundstrokes. He actually has the best strokes of the people I play with and watch locally.

When I play with a tweener type frame, I feel like I cannot let loose on my swings. I am a 4.0 guy.

Can anyone suggest another low-powered racquet that fits in this mold? I am currently using the Dunlop Aerogel 4D 300.

the obvious answer might seem "yes", but i don't think so
of course it will make someone "put more body" into the strokes, but that doesn't mean he/she will develop a good technique

Chotobaka
12-30-2012, 03:30 PM
I have given beginners and intermediates heavier, lower powered racquets and they generally seem to be able to handle these factors. What is more critical is how forgiving a particular racquet is.

Control racquets with smaller sweet spots and power zones require visual concentration -- being able to maintain that is the critical factor. Fatigue in concentration has a far greater effect than the physical fatigue of using a more demanding racquet IMO.

Rabbit
12-31-2012, 06:08 AM
IME, lessons are the absolute best way to develop your strokes regardless of racquet weight.

tom4ny
12-31-2012, 06:37 AM
IME, lessons are the absolute best way to develop your strokes regardless of racquet weight.

ditto to that! and not just having the pro feed balls from half court but real drills where the ball gets hit back and forth.

pshulam
12-31-2012, 07:21 AM
IME, lessons are the absolute best way to develop your strokes regardless of racquet weight.

.. and practices

TennisMD
01-01-2013, 01:36 PM
This occurred to me when I was watching a friend hit with the Wilson K90 6.1. He has very long fast strokes, good extension, and steps into the ball to drive his groundstrokes. He actually has the best strokes of the people I play with and watch locally.

When I play with a tweener type frame, I feel like I cannot let loose on my swings. I am a 4.0 guy.

Can anyone suggest another low-powered racquet that fits in this mold? I am currently using the Dunlop Aerogel 4D 300.

I have not read the rest of this thread, so forgive redundancies , the obvious answer is no. As you point out he has long fast strokes and good timing this is the type of player who uses this rkt. Basically ones intrisic talent, practice and fitness giving you the foot work to be set up for the shot allows for the great shot, if you don't posses these attributes then the rkt won't matter. There are many reasons one can hit out beside the racquet. I have said this before if pros and there are many who use PDs APDs etc ,who can hit harder than anybody on these brds,can control the ball what does this say, it says technique, technique matters most. Please don't talk about how their rkts are customized( they are customized to be heavier hence more powerful) but head size, beam thickness are the same. So getting back to the average Joe here a rkt can assist you or compensate for ones deficiencies, picking the right swing weight to allow for best timing is really important
So find the rkt the heaviest that you can swing effectively against equal if not slightly better player and practice practice.