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kiteboard
11-20-2012, 05:47 PM
Decide to.

make an agreement with yourself to work on serve and return, first strike.

Find good practice partners and treat them well.

make an agreement to get the reps you need to improve: consistency weapons sequences serving returning attacking net on short balls second serve speed and rpms

Lose weight if you need to.

Start split stepping.

Unit turn/coil early, before any ball bounces.

Use the non dominant hand/arm to point to the side fence after unit turning. It will solve a lot of problems, such as: coiling more, earlier preparation, more kinetic pathway.

Play down to get confidence.

Use practice to add and match play to subtract.

Uncoil faster.

Defend your contact point.

Master lull-jam-finish modes.

Learn to recognize quickly weaknesses of opponents.

Learn to protect your own.

Video tape your self to check on form. Buy a gohero pro camera at about $279. HIgh quality fps and easily edited.

Shadow swing.

Use a flex bar to increase endurance and speed/coiling and to prevent tennis elbow injuries.

Practice to improve.

Play for it, instead of the victory only.

Feel no fear.

Feel the ball, and realize in pressure, it's all about feel without fear.

Change your string and frame to match your style.

Realize that in match play, it will always come down to: who holds more, wins more second serve points, and who breaks more, and wins more second serve points.

Decide to become faster on unit turns and preparation/coil/uncoils.

Let low balls come closer and attack high balls farther out.

When returning, gauge your contact point off the sidelines in front.

One lunge step only.

Decide where to hit returns ahead of serve.

Decide where to serve ahead of time.

Use all types of spin and pace against opponents to see what they don't like.

FrisbeeFool
11-20-2012, 11:07 PM
Decide to.


Let low balls come closer and attack high balls farther out.

When returning, gauge your contact point off the sidelines in front.

Decide where to hit returns ahead of serve.


What?? Decide where to hit your return before your opponent serves? Are you kidding me? I understand maybe trying to target your opponents weaknesses if you have the opportunity, but on your returns a lot of it is just reacting to the shot you're returning. Being so doctrinaire and mechanical about everything is a recipe for unforced errors.

Why would you let low balls come in closer? Move in and take it out in front of you before it gets too low.

boramiNYC
11-20-2012, 11:12 PM
lots of good info. now how to do that quickly pls..

kiteboard
11-20-2012, 11:13 PM
And net it. Your arm will force you to be on top of the ball on a low ball too far out front. YOu have to be able to decide where you are going to return to, and be able to hit either dtl or cc off both sides no matter what serve is coming in.

Say Chi Sin Lo
11-20-2012, 11:14 PM
What the hell is this, a poem for the sport of tennis?

kiteboard
11-20-2012, 11:15 PM
lots of good info. now how to do that quickly pls..

Lots of reps, only clear ones. Most are not quick enough to play this game well. Or learn well. Or change. Or add. Or subtract.

The key is finding good partners to work with who are willing to cooperate.

The key is knowing what to work on.

The key is knowing what tension you like, what frame, what string.

The key is being able to decide something during a match and then making it come true.

It's like blowing out a birthday cake candle. Simple, mindless, unconscious, only a breath. Just imagine beautiful mindless smile you will have on your face when you win. Use visualization and creativity.

kiteboard
11-20-2012, 11:21 PM
What the hell is this, a poem for the sport of tennis?

It's only a poem if you do it. Then it's poetry in motion. The zone. A thoughtless beauty, whose only purpose is to serve you and make you happy.

That's what this list is.

A thoughtless beauty.

5263
11-20-2012, 11:21 PM
What?? Decide where to hit your return before your opponent serves? Are you kidding me?

A lot of coaches advocate this and many players seem to thrive with it.

I never liked it or did well with it in my game though. I like to be more instinctive
with it.

kiteboard
11-20-2012, 11:23 PM
A lot of coaches advocate this and many players seem to thrive with it.

I never liked it or did well with it in my game though. I like to be more instinctive
with it.

I can do it if I have enough reps in practice. And the server is not a strong one. Then I can put the ball anywhere. I've had people say, "I've never seen returns like that." It's like hitting a return ace. Why is that not a statistic? Very satisfying to be able to control returns so well that they hold only half the time.

frenzy
11-21-2012, 08:10 AM
A lot of coaches advocate this and many players seem to thrive with it.

I never liked it or did well with it in my game though. I like to be more instinctive
with it.

It's a mental technique, imaginary. I learned this technique from the book Smart Tennis and putting it into practice on serves. It's just part of the preparation of your shot.

Ps: The more you do it , the more options you can create and the faster you decide and visualize (even just a few milliseconds before the shot). I am now in the phase neutralize the server when it's big, attack on the opposite corner on server where I have more time. Try to practice, you'll it pays off :).

gmatheis
11-21-2012, 08:25 AM
What?? Decide where to hit your return before your opponent serves? Are you kidding me? I understand maybe trying to target your opponents weaknesses if you have the opportunity, but on your returns a lot of it is just reacting to the shot you're returning. Being so doctrinaire and mechanical about everything is a recipe for unforced errors.

Why would you let low balls come in closer? Move in and take it out in front of you before it gets too low.

I was playing some pickup doubles and my partner kept telling me when he was going to go down the line with his service return. I almost told him not to predetermine his return shot ... but then just kep quiet as it was more of a fun game than a competitive one.

5263
11-21-2012, 08:43 AM
It's a mental technique, imaginary. I learned this technique from the book Smart Tennis and putting it into practice on serves. It's just part of the preparation of your shot.

Ps: The more you do it , the more options you can create and the faster you decide and visualize (even just a few milliseconds before the shot). I am now in the phase neutralize the server when it's big, attack on the opposite corner on server where I have more time. Try to practice, you'll it pays off :).

I use it time for training, but would not use it in a match. No way I'm going to
try to force a ball to a spot if that is not where it needs to go. When I predetermine,
it tends to narrow my options, which may be good for some, but not in my best
interest. When the ball comes, I see things and it is clear for me where the ball
should go.

I don't agree in principle, so I wouldn't want to go in that direction. Maybe it helps
someone if they are not seeing the right options in real time?

bhallic24
11-21-2012, 08:52 AM
get a serve like raonic. that'll take u up a few levels stat. like from a 3.0 to a 5.0.

kiteboard
11-21-2012, 08:55 AM
If you happen to be 6'5" AND A GENETIC FREAK. He used a stock kblade strung with m2pro at 43/44 or 45/47 at IW.

Roforot
11-21-2012, 08:56 AM
<edit>
Master lull-jam-finish modes.

When returning, gauge your contact point off the sidelines in front.

One lunge step only.
<edit>



Editted to the aphorisms I didn't fully understand? How does one use the sidelines to guage contact point of serve?

sunof tennis
11-21-2012, 09:40 AM
I can do it if I have enough reps in practice. And the server is not a strong one. Then I can put the ball anywhere. I've had people say, "I've never seen returns like that." It's like hitting a return ace. Why is that not a statistic? Very satisfying to be able to control returns so well that they hold only half the time.

I usally do it hypothetically. If I get a forehand, I am going to do X, or I think if comes to my backhand, I will do y.

akamc
11-21-2012, 11:49 AM
What the heck is a lull-jam-finish mode?

LeeD
11-21-2012, 12:07 PM
"decide where to hit returns ahead of serve"...
Definitely something any good player should do.
Sure, you cannot possibly hit every return to the area you want.
BUT, you will now have a preconcieved target, with some room for error in either direction.
Some of you would be to day...hit up the middle. Well, that's basic 3.0-3.5 level returns, isn't it?
Why do you try to return serves? Most people, to neutralized the server's advantage. So hit to his weaker side, or the side you can handle his shots from.

kiteboard
11-22-2012, 09:08 AM
Editted to the aphorisms I didn't fully understand? How does one use the sidelines to guage contact point of serve?
Lull energy: It is felt internally as a “no miss” energy, a slower speed, low risk, lower speed of racquet and shot. It’s the, “put your opponent to sleep” shots with 2-5’ high net clearance and medium spin and your version of a medium mental attack. It feels as if you are projecting your thumb across the net onto the forehead of your opponent and managing him with that thumb. Is putting your opponent to sleep and moving him around just enough to allow him to beat himself without much pressure on your part. The French players are expert at this, Simon and Monfils, while Gasquet and Chardy are expert at finishing modes. The lull master keeps his shots out of the middle of the court, yet near the sidelines without taking risk.
Jam energy: It’s energy that jams your opponent’s timing. Heavy top spin, heavy pace, heavy slice, great drop shots, great kick serves, great flat shots that skid, any shot that changes the height, or depth, or pace radcially after the ball bounces, is jam energy. Even no pace slow balls are jammers. It’s a transition energy, that is higher risk and faster in nature. It is felt inside your body as a higher speed, higher risk application of spin and speed/depth/height change. Even drop shots have to be disguised quickly. This energy changes the speed of the ball radically or the direction or the height just after the ball bounces, and it’s this “radical change” which jams internal opponent rhythm. It’s as if you are jamming a spike into his body and causing his energy to jam. Psyches are also used to jam.
Finish energy: The riskiest type of energy. It’s low net clearance, high speed or high touch. It’s simply higher risk, put the ball away. Some of those bursts are finish based: they are clean winners. This applies to drop shots as well as flat or angled winners. This is lower net clearance, higher risk, higher stick speed shot. There are psychological components of each of these energies as well as the physical incoming shot.
Mastering the energies requires the ability to master both psych and body energy.
DEFEND THE BODY CLOCK INTERNAL SPEED Blazing fast Cheetah feet, and drunken monkey upper torso.
There are two internal body clock/engines running us at all times, an upper body engine and a lower body engine which are fueled by our energy types at all times. Our mental unit turn tells us to kill a shot, or push a shot, or jam a shot, or lull a shot, and the feet are on board if moving quickly in a martial arts, choppy way, and the upper body is on board if moving fluidly in a whip snapping relaxed way.
When the feet slow down, your clock/engine jams up. When the engine running your torso slows down and there is no fluid coil and no load to your shots.... If the incoming shot upsets your timing, it has succeeded. Most of the time when we make errors it’s due to a bad coil, or failure to maintain contact point. Both of these are caused by energy flow into our bodies.
The body clock is jammed when one or both of the bodies’ engines slows down . They have to be running at the same speed, a fast one, no matter what incoming shot! You have to defend your body clock speed just as you defend your contact point, regardless of incoming shots.
DEFEND THE CONTACT POINT, THE ARC YOUR ARM MAKES IN FRONT OF YOU.
Keep the engine speeds high and defend the contact point in front of you. Most errors are either coil errors, or contact point errors. Both are more commonly made in a transition from one mode to the next mode, lull to jam to finish. Most transition errors are made due to slow reactions and jammed engines. We are trained to hit the ball the same distance in front of us, no matter what the incoming shot. That causes a huge amount of mistakes. The correct contact point is not straight wall up/down in front of you. It varies according to the incoming shot’s height. It is shaped like an arced curve. This arc is determined by your own length of arm. Higher incoming shots have to be struck more out front, and lower shots are allowed into the body more before striking your own outgoing shot, due to the length of your own arm. If you place your arm straight out, eye level high, and let it drop, that is the arc you are defending on contact, both at net and on ground. If you use the same contact point on a low ball that you use on a medium high ball, you will net it. If you use the same contact point on a high ball that you use on a medium ball, you will hit it late and go out long. Our best contact point is when our arm is barred out front so the wrist can be locked at contact for maximum consistency, and that point is determined by the incoming shot’s height. Another facet of contact point is the spot in the string bed. It has to be in the right place in the bed. If too low, or too high, the strings are too short, their frequency level of rebound is too high, and there is not enough control. Some like to strike the ball high up, such as 3rd cross down from top. Some like it in the middle, 10th cross down. Most are inbetween.

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE UNIT TURN AND THE SPLIT STEP
Edberg came into net almost sitting down in his split. That gave him quicker lateral movement. Murray will go 6”-9" up in the air on his split. So did Chang and Hewitt. Players with the biggest or widest most extreme splits, often have the best defense/better foot work/quicker feet, ie, Chang, Hewitt, Sanchez vicario, Nadal, Murray, etc.. The split step affects the unit turn so profoundly. Ever notice how wide Djokovic stands while returning serve? It’s a full shoulder width and a half. So do all top returners, wider than anyone else. The advanced split step will point one foot to the side fence (the same side the ball is heading towards) and plant the other foot pointing towards the net, perpendicular to each other. This advanced split step causes a faster unit turn, because the turned foot pivots the upper body when that pivoted foot lands. When the pointed foot lands, it forces a faster unit turn, a faster decision on which shot you are going to hit. Turning sideways faster is a strategy is all about removing time from the unit turn, deciding ahead of time which shots to hit, so you don’t have to waste time thinking about it during the point, and to at the same time to force your opponent to spend more time reacting and thinking! Your mental unit turn has to be just as practiced and polished as the physical, and your decision on which energy type to use has to be automatic: lull-jam-finish. That is the decision of which energy to use, lull, jam, or finish, and how deep and hard and high the shot will be.

PRACTICE SEQUENCES
Typical combinations are: two lull shots, two jam shots, and two finish shots.
The physical unit turn is the only thing all top pros have in common. It’s the mental unit turn and their mastery over the three energy types that separates the very top from the next tier down.

When returning, spot a sideline or the lines in the service box. Use those to time your contact point, ie, if going cc in ad, use doubles alley line to be just behind your contact pt. for a cc bh return.
One lunge step refers to the one step you should take during returns if forced to reach.

Power Player
11-22-2012, 09:15 AM
I plan my serve returns as well. I faced a lot of serve and volley players in my day though. I don't find it odd to do this. I have broken serves by returning the ball to the same spot against certain players.

kiteboard
11-22-2012, 09:30 AM
I plan my serve returns as well. I faced a lot of serve and volley players in my day though. I don't find it odd to do this. I have broken serves by returning the ball to the same spot against certain players.

Listen to this guy. I usually break serve at about a 40-60% rate. That's with pro stock frames, leaded up to 365g, handle heavy, strung tight, with msv hex 1.10mm or bhb7/poly star energy.

travlerajm
11-22-2012, 09:36 AM
I sometimes plan my returns, depending on the situation.

In some cases, I plan ahead to use a "go with the pitch" return strategy. That is, if the pitch is away, I hit it to the opposite field. And if the pitch is inside, I pull it.

Other times, I plan ahead to put the return in a particular spot that favors winning the point. This might be "deep and high over the net", or it might be "get the return to his backhand."

Other times, when I play against a very big server who is hitting heavy serves that bounce high, I might return with my grip already in the continental position. This way, I am better prepared to return with a firm volley-like stroke, especially on forehand returns where the ball is up around my head and still rising.

treblings
11-22-2012, 12:01 PM
Listen to this guy. I usually break serve at about a 40-60% rate. That's with pro stock frames, leaded up to 356g, handle heavy, strung tight, with msv hex 1.10mm/poly star energy.

what´s your pro stock frame of choice?

pvaudio
11-22-2012, 12:28 PM
So the quick guide to improvement is to do every single thing that coaches tell you from day 1?

sureshs
11-22-2012, 01:28 PM
Realize that in match play, it will always come down to: who holds more, wins more second serve points, and who breaks more, and wins more second serve points.

Let low balls come closer and attack high balls farther out.

One lunge step only.



Really liked the first two.

What does the third one mean?

kiteboard
11-22-2012, 04:05 PM
what´s your pro stock frame of choice?

I've tried the pt57A, h22, and babolat pro stock frames. Currently getting used to the babs. But with bhb7/poly star energy or msvhex1.10mm/energy. Deadly slice with bhb7 and drops, and kicks/twists. Don't like the lack of control. Where is the holy grail?: Deadly spin/great control/great tension maintenance/low price? Does not exist yet.

kiteboard
11-22-2012, 04:06 PM
Really liked the first two.

What does the third one mean?

One lunge step on returns. All you have time for on a good serve. Have to cover 9 feet on either side with one step.

kiteboard
11-22-2012, 04:07 PM
So the quick guide to improvement is to do every single thing that coaches tell you from day 1?

No coach I've met knows about lull-jam-finish modes, or defense of contact point in an arc. That had to be learned the hard way.

kiteboard
11-22-2012, 04:09 PM
QUOTE=julian;7029193]Title: The relationship between match statistics and top 100 ranking in professional men's tennis
Machar Reid, Darren McMurtrie, Miguel Crespo
International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport 07/2010; 10(2):131-138.

Abstract
Match statistics are supplied at the majority of professional tennis tour events. The governing body of the men's tour - the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) - updates players' statistical profiles on a weekly basis. The relationships between the rankings and fourteen statistics describing the match performance of the top 100 male professional players in 2007 were examined to determine which statistics were most related to playing success. Partial correlations determined the strength of these associations and selected variables were entered into a stepwise regression procedure to predict professional ranking. Five variables were significant predictors of top 100 ranking while only second serve return points won and second serve points won remained in the final prediction equation, which accounted for 52% of the variance in professional ranking: predicted men's professional ranking = 548.5 + -666.6 * second serve points won + -319.9 * second serve return points won. This analysis suggests that second serve points won and second serve return points are among the most relevant statistics commonly available to ATP players.[/QUOTE]

5263
11-22-2012, 04:59 PM
No coach I've met knows about lull-jam-finish modes, or defense of contact point in an arc. That had to be learned the hard way.

Imo the lull jam finish is more about where you are on the court, and don't
know how else you would defend the Cp except with your swing arc.

Ash_Smith
11-23-2012, 07:07 AM
No coach I've met knows about lull-jam-finish modes, or defense of contact point in an arc. That had to be learned the hard way.

I think perhaps because those are terms you've made up (at least in respect of tennis). I'm sure the majority of coaches understand defending, trading and finishing for example.

I'm still at a loss to understand how you achieve any of the things you have listed quickly - there are certainly plenty of ways to improve there, but how many can be achieve quickly?!

cheers

kiteboard
11-23-2012, 11:05 AM
Just knowing the info will speed things up so much, rather than not knowing it, as I had to teach myself without any help. If you have a mentor he can help you. I had none and took no lessons, and look how long it took to learn the game. I don't know the game from coaching, or a pro. From watching pros play. From trying it myself. From failing over and over to learn it.

No coach I've seen tells students that the contact point is an arc instead of a wall in front of you.

No one has told me to lull opponents to sleep before attacking, while showing them the same coil, the same look, but using a faster uncoil to hit a jamming shot.

These terms are ones I've made up because they are on the mark.

As far as quickly goes, that depends on the individuals confidence and ability to learn quickly.

kiteboard
11-23-2012, 11:14 AM
I sometimes plan my returns, depending on the situation.

In some cases, I plan ahead to use a "go with the pitch" return strategy. That is, if the pitch is away, I hit it to the opposite field. And if the pitch is inside, I pull it.

Other times, I plan ahead to put the return in a particular spot that favors winning the point. This might be "deep and high over the net", or it might be "get the return to his backhand."

Other times, when I play against a very big server who is hitting heavy serves that bounce high, I might return with my grip already in the continental position. This way, I am better prepared to return with a firm volley-like stroke, especially on forehand returns where the ball is up around my head and still rising.







I find it interesting that the most comments made in the thread deal with the one item: choosing where to hit returns ahead of time. Of course that's easier to do with second serves as they are weaker shots. First serves are harder to do this with as you have less time. But why the resulting interest in just this one item when there are so many here?


I would have thought there would be more interest in the lull master item. Or serving. Usually, when people pay to learn, from a pro, (Guys who I can usually beat easily, as they are usually only at a 4.5 level), they ask for serving lessons. But that is not true here on the board.


I don't think that it's any different: our weakest shot is the hardest one for us to learn, and for most of us that is: the serve. So why be more interested in choosing return sites? I think because so many don't do that.

tennis_balla
11-23-2012, 12:42 PM
What?? Decide where to hit your return before your opponent serves? Are you kidding me? I understand maybe trying to target your opponents weaknesses if you have the opportunity, but on your returns a lot of it is just reacting to the shot you're returning. Being so doctrinaire and mechanical about everything is a recipe for unforced errors.

Why would you let low balls come in closer? Move in and take it out in front of you before it gets too low.

You should have a clear idea of what you are going to do with your return and where you're going to hit it. Just like you decide where you will hit your serve, its the same on the return and in doubles more so.

Pro's do not decide to run around their backhands on a second serve and hit a forehand inside out after their opponent hits the serve. This is pre-determined before the opponent even tosses the ball.

guitarplayer
11-23-2012, 04:40 PM
How many Red Bulls have you had today?

sureshs
11-24-2012, 11:32 AM
One lunge step on returns. All you have time for on a good serve. Have to cover 9 feet on either side with one step.

Since players usually take only one step on return, you are saying it should be a big step, I assume.

kiteboard
11-24-2012, 12:03 PM
One step has to be able to cover the best most accurate serves, so that step has to be able to go big, but only if nec. Many try to take more than one step and never catch up to the ball at all.

FrisbeeFool
11-24-2012, 12:40 PM
I plan my serve returns as well. I faced a lot of serve and volley players in my day though. I don't find it odd to do this. I have broken serves by returning the ball to the same spot against certain players.

I find with serve and volley players I have to be more flexible with my return. If I plan to go to one spot ahead of time, say deep and cross court, they can move in and take it out of the air. Against serve and volleyers, I have to watch them a little bit and be ready to put the ball at their feet if they try to come in.

In doubles I try to go cross court with almost every return. I think that's pretty common.

FrisbeeFool
11-24-2012, 12:54 PM
You should have a clear idea of what you are going to do with your return and where you're going to hit it. Just like you decide where you will hit your serve, its the same on the return and in doubles more so.

Pro's do not decide to run around their backhands on a second serve and hit a forehand inside out after their opponent hits the serve. This is pre-determined before the opponent even tosses the ball.

That's makes sense on a second serve where they are trying to be aggressive and take control. On a lot of first serves it seems like people react to the ball more and are forced to hit backhands.

In doubles I was taught to always go cross court with the return. But I usually just hit a backhand or forehand because of where their ball placement was, not because of what I decided to do before hand.

I feel like on certain big points it works well to have a preplanned play, but if I tried to do it on every point, I would be hitting a ton of unforced errors.

I remember that monster forehand return Djokovic hit against Federer down double match point at the us open. I feel like he only takes chances like that in certain situation, because if he did every time, he would be giving away too many free points.

In singles I feel like I react a lot more to what I'm given, instead of going cross court every time. You clearly know what you're talking with first hand experience at the highest levels, so I can't argue. But I feel like even pros as good as Fed have to be flexible and hit a lot of improvisational returns, especially in singles.

FrisbeeFool
11-24-2012, 12:56 PM
What's the lull jam?

5263
11-25-2012, 06:56 AM
That's makes sense on a second serve where they are trying to be aggressive and take control. On a lot of first serves it seems like people react to the ball more and are forced to hit backhands.

I agree. Clearly this is a tip for those who are not making the right decisions in
real time, so deciding in advance may help some in that area. If you are seeing
the good areas to take the serve to on the fly, why would you change to
decide in advance. Why change something that is working well? Clearly a fix
for a weakness, but if it works and helps for them,....great!

Sure I may think about trying to run around the Bh if I get anything that looks
right, but if you lock in on that decision in advance, you may get a serve that is too
flat and wide or start to move around only to get aced down the T with a crisp
one. Most of us have seen that happen to even the best players, but I'm thinking
it is more due to a poor read on the serve rather than preplanned return in most
cases.

On the other hand, maybe this is all more about terms again. For me, looking to
attack their body or Bh if I get the right ball,
is not the same as making the decision in advance.

mxmx
11-27-2012, 04:01 AM
*double post*

mxmx
11-27-2012, 04:02 AM
On the other hand, maybe this is all more about terms again. For me, looking to
attack their body or Bh if I get the right ball,
is not the same as making the decision in advance.

I try and decide beforehand where I will return if the serve is easy.....and if the serve is difficult, I fall back on my backup plan.

For example:
Plan A: attack/down the line/ball to volleyer feet/double backhand topspin/etc
Plan B: defend/crosscourt/lob/loop/block return backhand/etc

if the serve is easy, i return with either a plan A or B, depending on my comfort in the return. If the serve is too difficult, i return with a plan B (defence/persentage orientated)...Generally my plan A, is attack orientated.

Either way, i try and decide what my main return would be, or what my "backup" return will be....

kiteboard
11-27-2012, 08:08 AM
Anyone who plays doubles decides ahead of time to mostly hit away from the net man, ie. cc returns are then dialed in and many cannot change that in singles play.

5263
11-27-2012, 08:05 PM
Anyone who plays doubles decides ahead of time to mostly hit away from the net man,

I also intend to hit away from the netman on most occasions, but since we don't
know where he will be when we return, I can't pick ahead where to hit and expect
to avoid him. I return based on the serve I get, combined with if I think he is going,
staying, or faking. I intend to hit my shot well enough that it doesn't matter so
much if I read his move incorrectly, especially since I also have factored in his weakness
in the decision.

Skiddywompus
11-30-2012, 09:48 PM
You told me to check out this page and I certainly don't regret it! I'm definitely going to start practicing with some of the things said and I'll keep notes to see if I've improved! Thanks! Please, if you have any other posts concerning techniques like this let me know!

kiteboard
12-01-2012, 12:02 AM
This one thread will give you a high position strategy and technique and match play. The lull thread will teach you how to develop your energy and once you focus on that, timing is way easier to master.