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View Full Version : Spin effect technology vs. "normal" racket


three.dee
11-21-2012, 09:37 AM
Hello everybody,

This is my first post in this forum and I am very happy that I've found such a big online tennis community!

Here is my question: my old racket (which has about 8 years now) has broke a few weeks ago and since then I'm searching for a new one.
I see that there are a lot of options out there, but after a lot of study I managed to narrow down to search to just a few models.

I am an advanced player and my style of play is based on control and spin. Of course I also hit flat when needed. I like rackets over 320 g heavy with about the same swingweight, so the racket that I put my eyes on is the Wilson Pro Staff Six One 90, since this one is pretty heavy, it has a pretty big swingweight, it is headlight for easy manouvering, a bit opened pattern, etc.

But now, I see that Wilson (I am a Wilson fan by the way) comes with a new technology: the spin effect which got me thinking a bit... It is another option which is a bit more different.

Of course I'd like more RPM, every player that spins would like that, but wouldn't the wide opened pattern hurt my control and my flat shots?
I see that a lot of players who tested the Steam 99S are very impressed with the extra spin compared to a "normal" racket, but no one talks about the control difference over a "normal" racket...

If I think on my own, I would say that the control has to suffer with a much opened pattern... The rule that I know is the opened the pattern is, the less control you have, but maybe someone who tested this racket can give me a bit more info about the difference from a normal racket. I would highly appreciate that!

Basically, my question is: if I am an advanced player and I like classic rackets, should i change to this new technology, will it improve my game?
I think many people are thinking about this and I hope answering my question will help others as well.

I hope I haven't bothered anyone with my long story, I wanted to be as precise as possible.

Thank you and I would like to see any input you have on this matter!

parasailing
11-21-2012, 09:43 AM
Only time will tell. It's not out yet so we are all patiently waiting for the racquet to come out to try it. Those that have tried it have posted positive reviews but they haven't really had a chance to use it for long duration of time which I think is needed before you can decide whether it is right for you.

LeeD
11-21-2012, 10:18 AM
We're all comtemplating exactly the same thing.
In the end, it's whether we tend to embrace or forego modern technology, as it appears the results will be very little, but noticeable difference.
Most guys who switch from decent old racket's to modern rackets hit a hair harder, a hair more spin, might stress out their arms a bit, but overall play at the same level.
Lotsa old folks play with 12 year old rackets, and still play at the same level their were, whether 3.5 or 7.0.
Some old folks play with (gotta be clear here, old folks meaning experienced players) the latest and greatest, which helps them keep their stoke, but still play at the same levels.
Now for sure I'm not a tech based sportsman. I think, if I can play nearly like the best of 20 years ago, I'd be one of the best today.

Crisp
11-21-2012, 12:36 PM
Is the new spin tech just another one of their marketing bs like basalt and amplifeel etc? Each year I feel they trick the consumer into thinking this new tech is going to massively improve their game. Of course this is the marketing departments job. I find it is always easier not to be an early adopter of these type of things and once a lot of people have had a lot of time using the new tech. You can better judge if it is real, take poly for example.... I don't mind saying I was not an early adopter of poly strings preferring to stay with a high end multi until well into the poly's appearance. Eventually I had to see if what everyone was saying was true and took the time to change tension and mixed with all the different variables. Now on the off time that I have to use a syn gut or multi racquet the ball seems to come off on the wrong angle. Perhaps in time a big majority of player will change to this more open pattern cause the benefits are just to hard to ignore.

dmcb101
11-22-2012, 07:34 AM
Is the new spin tech just another one of their marketing bs like basalt and amplifeel etc? Each year I feel they trick the consumer into thinking this new tech is going to massively improve their game. Of course this is the marketing departments job. I find it is always easier not to be an early adopter of these type of things and once a lot of people have had a lot of time using the new tech. You can better judge if it is real, take poly for example.... I don't mind saying I was not an early adopter of poly strings preferring to stay with a high end multi until well into the poly's appearance. Eventually I had to see if what everyone was saying was true and took the time to change tension and mixed with all the different variables. Now on the off time that I have to use a syn gut or multi racquet the ball seems to come off on the wrong angle. Perhaps in time a big majority of player will change to this more open pattern cause the benefits are just to hard to ignore.

Read this...

http://www.tennis.com/gear/2012/09/gear-talk-wilsons-john-lyons-part-2/39407/#.UK5SpIfoR8E

http://www.tennis.com/gear/2012/09/gear-talk-wilsons-john-lyons-part-2/39407/#.UK5S44foR8E

http://www.tennis.com/gear/2012/09/gear-talk-wilsons-john-lyons-part-3/39411/#.UK5TDIfoR8G

Its not just a gimmic. My Wilson Rep said that these racquets will sell like hot cakes and I believe him due to my play test with them. I am a teaching pro in Wisconsin and I was impressed with these racquets.

Crisp
11-22-2012, 01:19 PM
Interesting article, which I want to believe. One of my female players looks like they will be sponsored by Head in 2013 and I would like to see how this spin effect technology would help or hinder her game. Don't want her to be left behind or disadvantaged especially as she hits a pretty flat ball and would not have to modify her swing to get extra spin and as stated in the article would likely help the women's game. This is a tough one. Anyone else car to way in?

v-verb
11-22-2012, 01:40 PM
Isn't it mainly wider string spacing? Or something else?

robbo1970
11-23-2012, 12:32 AM
I suppose though, if a racket offers the potential for extra spin (or extra power), its all really down to whether that can be controlled consistently and effectively.

I just think when choosing a racket, to try and find one that pretty much does everything as opposed to just being good at certain shots.

un6a
11-23-2012, 12:57 AM
Isn't it mainly wider string spacing? Or something else?

It's just wider string spacing and marketing imo. From latest forum curiosity about this racquet i guess it works (i mean marketing not racquet).

ricki
11-23-2012, 05:25 AM
It's just wider string spacing and marketing imo. From latest forum curiosity about this racquet i guess it works (i mean marketing not racquet).

Methinks its all marketing, if it was THAT good, then you would see all pro's run around with this...

dmcb101
11-23-2012, 09:11 AM
Methinks its all marketing, if it was THAT good, then you would see all pro's run around with this...

You should read the article before commenting because they discuss this exact point you are trying to make. Give it a read, its pretty interesting and will probably only take you 10 minutes!

three.dee
11-23-2012, 10:37 AM
I actually read that article, few days after it was published. That was the time I first heard about this new technology.

I think that most of the people who wrote here are right, there can't be a very big difference since there isn't so much to be invented about rackets anymore...
However, I am sure that it actually helps to get more RPM to the ball, this can't be a lie, but I am quite certain that they had to trade some control for this.

Anyway, today I've just ordered a Wilson Pro Staff Six.One 90 which comes right in my demands from a racket (I hope) and I'm really looking forward to receive it and use it.

Maybe I'll have the opportunity to playtest a 99s, this would be the best way to spot a difference.

CSquared
11-23-2012, 01:49 PM
I hit the 99s and was pretty impressed. Increased spin was noticeable. Kick serves were really jumpy. Would have liked it more in the 325 g range, unstrung. I was impressed with the 1619 blade, also. I did have a hard time flattening out ground-strokes w the steam.

The string used in the demos helped w spin potential IMO. I've put 4g in my pog93s and a current blx90. Bending the ball is definitely noticeably easier, and my reference point is rpm17. Tension loss is noticeably decreased, also.

Is it too much to ask for Wilson to make a flat beam, 6.1 93, in 16x18 @ 11.7 unstrung?

Say Chi Sin Lo
11-23-2012, 03:36 PM
It's just wider string spacing and marketing imo. From latest forum curiosity about this racquet i guess it works (i mean marketing not racquet).

It's not just wider string spacing, the theory here is that: because the mains glides on less crosses, there's less friction between the mains the crosses, so the mains can move more freely and a greater "snap-back" effect. So in some way, it's open pattern and then some.

That's the theory anyway, whether or not it works is still controversial because it's not out yet.

And to the majority of the public, I think it's going to be marketing bs gimmick. Most people don't swing/brush fast enough to even take advantage of polyesters. And on top of that, if a player hits flat, it doesn't matter what kind of pattern the racquet has, spin remains predominantly the function of your stroke and technique.

v-verb
11-23-2012, 05:43 PM
I re-read the article.

I think it's worth testing the racquet to see if it actually delivers. The article was pretty thorough

Until then I'll be enjoying my wide-string-spaced Prince Borons and Graphites

retrograde
11-23-2012, 11:09 PM
That 3-part article was very interesting. As an engineer, I appreciate how they included test results data. It's a novel yet intuitive approach.

I'll be interested in how much control is affected by having different linear string densities along the long and short axes of the racquet head. I assume the "Spin Effect" stringbed grid will look more little rectangles than little squares?

My kingdom for a few hundred extra RPMS (6" to 7" shorter court depth for rec players, according to the article)! :)

Stroke
11-24-2012, 01:48 PM
As someone mentioned, if this new technology works, the pros will be using it. Even Federer could use more action/spin on his serves and ground strokes to make things even more difficult for his opponents.

Power Player
11-24-2012, 02:24 PM
It works. At the cost of control and hitting through the court. That is my prediction. When pros say they could use more spin, it is basically saying they could use more spin without changing any facet of their game. That is why polys are game changers more than racquets.

Xizel
11-24-2012, 02:25 PM
As someone mentioned, if this new technology works, the pros will be using it. Even Federer could use more action/spin on his serves and ground strokes to make things even more difficult for his opponents.

It's good in theory, but as noted in the article, too many crosses make a less controllable string bed. At the speed and spin of ATP balls, the lesser amount of crosses could prove to be too uncontrollable even with increased spin. Also because of the increased spin, it could lessen the ability to flatten the ball.

LeeD
11-24-2012, 02:46 PM
String durability?
Reward for swinging thru?
What about blocking shots and volleys, the opposite of a topspin groundie?
Would softening tension on 18x20 down to 40 lbs make the same effect?
Can you gain something without losing anything else?
Howzit on your arm longterm?
Since pros hit sooo much harder, maybe what works for US doesn't work correctly for THEM.

thecrusher956
11-24-2012, 04:37 PM
What will this do to a big, flat hitter...? I don't use too much topspin and hit really big... what would this racket change?

three.dee
11-25-2012, 12:47 AM
I do believe this technology might actually help a certain segment of players, but I do not think that segment consists of advanced players who can already generate enough spin and power of their own.
I do not think such a player would trade control for some extra spin...
After all, power and spin are nothing without control.

dmcb101
11-25-2012, 06:04 AM
I do believe this technology might actually help a certain segment of players, but I do not think that segment consists of advanced players who can already generate enough spin and power of their own.
I do not think such a player would trade control for some extra spin...
After all, power and spin are nothing without control.

This is what I think Wilson intended to do when they set out to make this racquet.