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View Full Version : Running Forehand vs Squash Shot


crazygamer2091
11-23-2012, 07:46 PM
Over the summer whenever someone pulled a ball out wide to my forehand that caused some trouble for me, I would resort to a sliding squash shot. Recently, I found myself to be hitting more running forehands and now have completely forgot how to hit a squash shot.

What do you guys think is a more beneficial shot to use. A squash shot will buy you more time when you are on the defensive because it is more like a flat slice and you can stretch out more to reach it. A running forehand on the other hand gives more variety but chances are the ball will come back if you do not hit a straight out winner. In addition, the ball must be reachable to hit it.

Thoughts? Pros and cons of each shot?

Cheetah
11-23-2012, 09:13 PM
They are not comparable. Different situations with different purposes.

It's like asking "Which do you think is more beneficial to use.. a backhand or a forehand?"

crazygamer2091
11-23-2012, 09:33 PM
They are not comparable. Different situations with different purposes.

It's like asking "Which do you think is more beneficial to use.. a backhand or a forehand?"

Then could you elaborate about each shot, situations to use them and and purposes?

Say Chi Sin Lo
11-23-2012, 09:46 PM
It depends on what I'm dealing with, who I'm playing (aggressive net-bumrusher, or baseliner with netphobia), etc.

But if you ask me to pick one, running forehand, and try to hit a winner. Because chances are I've given away the court so even if squash it back, I'm either going to be pulled to another corner or lost the point on the next ball.

Though if I'm still inside the double's alley, I'll probably squash it back because I can still recover and I haven't given away the court (as much). If I'm at or beyond the double's alley, I'll take advantage of the angle and try to go for a winner (IF I can get there with enough time).

But again, too many factors to consider.

Cheetah
11-23-2012, 09:46 PM
glad you asked a follow up. that was my intention hehe.

squash shot is a last ditch effort shot. used when that's the only way you can get the racquet on the ball. totally stretched out. no other shot is possible. or can be used when you are a little bit lazy or winded from being pulled on a string for a few shots.

running forehand is used when on a dead run and you have time to hit an aggressive shot either 3/4 angle or dtl. you have time to transfer weight into the shot maybe some angular momentum etc.
running forehands can be very powerful.

they are different situations. if you are using a squash shot when you could be using a running fh then you are lazy, winded, have poor footwork or need more understanding of the game.

IMHO

OHBH
11-23-2012, 09:52 PM
Then could you elaborate about each shot, situations to use them and and purposes?

Well if you can get to the ball in time hit a running forehand. If your opponent is at the net hit a running forehand or lob. Squash shot is for when it is the only way you can get the ball back or the opponent is hanging back near the baseline instead of attacking like they should, in which case you can buy time and hopefully restart the point.

Of course this is generally speaking and will certainly vary but you should be able to figure it out.

Greg G
11-23-2012, 10:30 PM
Would it be correct to say that for a squash shot you are moving/running/sliding diagonally backwards and have no other option but to hit a squash shot?

tlm
11-24-2012, 08:03 AM
glad you asked a follow up. that was my intention hehe.

squash shot is a last ditch effort shot. used when that's the only way you can get the racquet on the ball. totally stretched out. no other shot is possible. or can be used when you are a little bit lazy or winded from being pulled on a string for a few shots.

running forehand is used when on a dead run and you have time to hit an aggressive shot either 3/4 angle or dtl. you have time to transfer weight into the shot maybe some angular momentum etc.
running forehands can be very powerful.

they are different situations. if you are using a squash shot when you could be using a running fh then you are lazy, winded, have poor footwork or need more understanding of the game.

IMHO


I don't agree with your last paragraph, just because you use a squash shot instead of a running forehand even though you had time to hit either does not necessarily mean any of your examples are true.

A running forehand that pulls you out of position and becomes a do or die shot depending on the situation can be a foolish choice. The squash shot makes it so much easier to recover and restart the point.

The squash shot can be a very effective shot, there are times I use it in a neutral top spin rally just to change the pace and throw my opponent off. But in most cases it is used because your opponent has made a good shot that has pulled you out of position, and it is a lot higher % shot than trying to hit the running forehand. Like the saying goes consistent tennis wins.

dominikk1985
11-24-2012, 08:15 AM
chipping back is an emergency shot. you always want to return with topspin if possible.

andy murray uses it a lot though but he is a pusher:).

tlm
11-24-2012, 08:37 AM
chipping back is an emergency shot. you always want to return with topspin if possible.

andy murray uses it a lot though but he is a pusher:).


Ya right the guy that won the US open and olympic gold metal is a pusher and the rest of us here are far superior so we should go for the top spin shot.

dominikk1985
11-24-2012, 08:42 AM
Ya right the guy that won the US open and olympic gold metal is a pusher and the rest of us here are far superior so we should go for the top spin shot.

that was a joke...

Cheetah
11-24-2012, 11:46 AM
I don't agree with your last paragraph, just because you use a squash shot instead of a running forehand even though you had time to hit either does not necessarily mean any of your examples are true.

A running forehand that pulls you out of position and becomes a do or die shot depending on the situation can be a foolish choice. The squash shot makes it so much easier to recover and restart the point.

The squash shot can be a very effective shot, there are times I use it in a neutral top spin rally just to change the pace and throw my opponent off. But in most cases it is used because your opponent has made a good shot that has pulled you out of position, and it is a lot higher % shot than trying to hit the running forehand. Like the saying goes consistent tennis wins.

Do or die.. isn't that the same as 'last ditch effort'? what's the difference?

If you are hitting a squash shot to change it up then you are hitting a slice, not a squash shot.

They are different shots for different situations.

tlm
11-24-2012, 02:11 PM
Do or die.. isn't that the same as 'last ditch effort'? what's the difference?

If you are hitting a squash shot to change it up then you are hitting a slice, not a squash shot.

They are different shots for different situations.

Do or die is just that you make a great running forehand or lose the point. As opposed to hitting a squash shot that is not as offensive but lets you recover and stay in the point, huge difference.

SStrikerR
11-25-2012, 12:23 PM
Yeah there shouldn't be a choice. Unless you have some strategical purpose for it, you should only be hitting a squash shot when a normal forehand isnt even possible.

Magnetite
11-25-2012, 12:31 PM
Squash shot is generally used for shots u can barely get to, when you are on the extreme stretch ..

Running forehands are used when you are able to get to the ball a little easier.

They really aren't comparable.

vil
11-25-2012, 02:10 PM
If you were only watching tennis in TV, you wouldn't be asking this question.

crazygamer2091
11-25-2012, 04:52 PM
If you were only watching tennis in TV, you wouldn't be asking this question.

Would you like me to apologize for asking a question?

boramiNYC
11-25-2012, 07:21 PM
I always thought a squash shot was an emergency shot. this is a different from forehand slice which could be a part of regular fh options for rec players. I rarely see this among pros. squash shot is mostly wrist shot in full extension. not a good habit for a regular shot. running fh otoh can be a regular shot. so you sound to be on the right track.

KineticChain
11-25-2012, 07:55 PM
I think hitting a forehand on the run is always the better choice when you are able to. It can be an offensive shot, especially when pulled out wide... you get a bigger angle to attack with. If the ball is too far out of your strike zone, the squash shot is really your only option. Its difficult to make it an offensive shot because of the backspin lifting the ball up... you can only hit it so hard before it goes out

Rob1
11-26-2012, 03:35 PM
I find hitting a cross court slice on the run can be equally an
offensive shot as you got your opponent by surprise.

LeeD
11-26-2012, 03:54 PM
Squash underspin shot for defense, and quicker recovery with an open stance.
Running forehand for offense, to end the point on that shot, you running into the bleacher's, to kiss the nearest hottie spectator while your shot goes for a winner.

crazygamer2091
11-28-2012, 12:39 PM
Haha, that made my day LeeD!

Phonco
11-28-2012, 01:53 PM
I think a lot of it has to do with the ability/capability of yourself and your opponent.

If I have to hit a passing shot, then I would prefer a running forehand. Unless I can blast a squash shot Kiefer style or my opponent can't volley underspin, then any slice type of shot will be an easy put away. I

If your opponent is not coming into the net, then the options tend to vary. If I can recover quickly and can hit an offensive shot, then I will go for the forehand. If I know I'll be lagging in my recovery, then I will opt for the squash shot. However, the most important thing for me is to make sure the squash shot neutralizes the rally. If I can't then the squash is pointless, it just gives my opponent a huge advantage. I'd be better off just blasting the forehand and hope for a winner.

If I'm on the dead run, then the squash shot is preferred. I need the extra time to recover. This is barring me deciding "screw it, I'm going to hit a winner" and hoping for the best.

tl;dr

If you can neutralize the rally, and know your opponent won't/can't do anything, then hit the squash shot. Reset the rally and buy yourself time to recover.

If you're confident in your offensive capability, then hit the running forehand. You'll either regain advantage or win the point. This is my (and should be the) preferred/optimal choice.

mxmx
11-29-2012, 06:14 AM
I agree that the "forehand slice" shot is generally normal when one is really on the run. Like a defensive lob or a defensive slice, except on the forehand. But that low percentage "squash like" you see these days, to me, is a far from ideal and lazy stroke. It is played with the wrist and not proper technique like one would normally play a backhand or forehand slice.
One can defensively play just as much spin, except topspin, and loop the ball to give yourself time to recover. Or one could reach the ball with better footwork, and play a forehand slice with the correct technique. Any spin slows a ball down. The miracle squash shot is just too low percentage and that can become a bad habit very quickly.

Questions to ask are:
- could you have used better footwork to reach the ball in time?
- could you play topspin or proper technique slice instead?
- Are you serious in hitting that in a a match or leisurely just hitting a fun shot socially?

Imo: Serious shot, hardly ever...leisure shot, sure.

Off The Wall
11-29-2012, 09:43 AM
Cheetah's answer is the correct one...if you're a high level player. For high level players there is no debate about which one to use; it's decided for you.

Otherwise, I guess there's plenty to think about.

tlm
11-29-2012, 05:55 PM
I find hitting a cross court slice on the run can be equally an
offensive shot as you got your opponent by surprise.

Exactly plus it gives you more time to recover.

LeeD
11-29-2012, 06:24 PM
The reason the squash open stanced underspin forehand works is that it is underspun for slow ball speed, it stays low over the net to discourage the opponent from moving forwards, and you stop as you hit the ball, rather than run thru like a running forehand, which gives you better positioning to recover over the running forehand. Plus, an underspin from the forehand side is seldom hit, so it's harder for the opponent to attack. He's used to your topspin forehands.
If you just need the time, why not lob?

KineticChain
11-29-2012, 06:59 PM
If I have to hit a passing shot, then I would prefer a running forehand. Unless I can blast a squash shot Kiefer style or my opponent can't volley underspin, then any slice type of shot will be an easy put away.

Here it is (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0yQ2UqUUZwc)
I could watch that all day. And I just might..

LeeD
11-29-2012, 07:22 PM
Yes, you could watch it all day, but it's a low percentage shot...which is why you would watch it all day.
Sliced forehand passing shots are tough to hit consistently, especially for a winner. You hit topspin forehands all day, then expect a once in a match slice to win you the point?
How about....lucky shot.

mikeler
11-30-2012, 05:33 AM
I hit a beautiful squash shot forehand crosscourt passing shot last night. Too bad I lost the match...

KenC
11-30-2012, 06:14 AM
Most people aren't capable of consistently ripping a FH for a winner with good setup, so the chances of hitting it on the run are really low. Everytime I do get to a wide ball while running and rip it the ball returns to the opposite corner for the winner.

Every now and then I may hit a squash shot CC, but usually I just pop the ball up high and deep to their backhand and hope it resets the point.

Cheetah
11-30-2012, 09:34 AM
pop it up high and deep to their backhand? are you a lefty?

KenC
11-30-2012, 10:21 AM
pop it up high and deep to their backhand? are you a lefty?

Yep.

But also a righty could pop it up to the same court, or even center court to lessen the angles, and still recover in plenty of time. It's just not a great idea to smack a ball from a bad position to the opponent's stronger wing. I think there are better chances of resetting the point and winning it rather than being able to hit a winner on the run.

Here is where the FH slice is a viable shot as if hit well enough can give time for recovery and hopefully it stays low enough that the opponent has to hit up on it. But I still think a high ball to the BH is harder for the opponent to manage.

LeeD
11-30-2012, 11:54 AM
I love this thread.
So, all practice sessions, you hit topspin forehands.
All warmups, you hit topspin forehands.
So, in a match, when driven wide to your forehand side, you look to hit a squash shot underspin forehand for a clean winner.
Good strategy!

Cheetah
11-30-2012, 01:48 PM
Yep.

But also a righty could pop it up to the same court, or even center court to lessen the angles, and still recover in plenty of time. It's just not a great idea to smack a ball from a bad position to the opponent's stronger wing. I think there are better chances of resetting the point and winning it rather than being able to hit a winner on the run.

Here is where the FH slice is a viable shot as if hit well enough can give time for recovery and hopefully it stays low enough that the opponent has to hit up on it. But I still think a high ball to the BH is harder for the opponent to manage.

by 'popping up' are you saying a lob?
and are you saying a righty could pop it up to a righties fh on a running fh?

most running forehands go back crosscourt which for righties would be to their stronger wing. that's the best shot in that situation.

KenC
11-30-2012, 11:29 PM
by 'popping up' are you saying a lob?
and are you saying a righty could pop it up to a righties fh on a running fh?

most running forehands go back crosscourt which for righties would be to their stronger wing. that's the best shot in that situation.

Put yourself in the opponent's shoes. You just hit a wide FH and your opponent is running off court. What shot do you want him to hit back to you? I want him to hit a hard CC so I can quickly hit the open court so that he will have no chance of getting to it.

One thing I have learned in tennis is to not give my opponent his preferred shots to work with. I certainly don't want to help him beat me. If he pulls me off court he is getting a topspin moonball high and deep to his BH in response.

Cheetah
11-30-2012, 11:51 PM
Put yourself in the opponent's shoes. You just hit a wide FH and your opponent is running off court. What shot do you want him to hit back to you? I want him to hit a hard CC so I can quickly hit the open court so that he will have no chance of getting to it.

One thing I have learned in tennis is to not give my opponent his preferred shots to work with. I certainly don't want to help him beat me. If he pulls me off court he is getting a topspin moonball high and deep to his BH in response.

Put yourself in the defender's shoes. The opponent has just hit a wide fh and you are running off court. What shot do you want to hit back? A risky low percentage down the line shot and pray for a winner? Pop up a high ball on the same side of the court leaving the other side of the court wide open and giving the opponent a no-brainer to go the open court and hope that your pop up is high and deep enough so that it doesn't become an easily attack-able chest high ball and hope your opponent doesn't force you to run all the way back to the other side of the court?
Hit it back to the middle of the court where the opponent is waiting and now has his pick or high percentage shots going either to the ad court, up the middle or crosscourt?

Or would you do the smart thing by choosing the high percentage shot which is to hit it back cross court preferably a 3/4 wide shot which gives you more court to hit into, gives you more margin for error, makes the opponent move out of the court which reduces his capacity for power and short selection and thereby forcing a smart opponent to now choose between either
1) the high percentage return which is going back crosscourt right to where you already waiting, giving yourself more time to recover, less area to recover back to and more time to setup, or
2) choosing a low percentage shot by attempting a down the line winner from their wide position?

One thing I've learned in tennis is to pick the correct shots for a given situation.

The correct shot in this situation is back crosscourt. Sure, everybody likes to hit the occasional highlight dtl winner at times but you miss those more often than not.

If you watch the pro's more than 90% of the time they are going 3/4 wide cc on a running forehand. The pro's play smarter tennis than we do so this is what we should emulate.

martini1
12-09-2012, 07:04 PM
Can somebody post a pic of a squash shot?
Is it the one where Fed or Djoker streth legs almost to a split, facing the net and scoop the ball back?

VeeSe
12-09-2012, 07:12 PM
Can somebody post a pic of a squash shot?
Is it the one where Fed or Djoker streth legs almost to a split, facing the net and scoop the ball back?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRhEdF-GVkg

Basically it's a forehand slice.

Jay_The_Nomad
12-10-2012, 09:00 PM
Over the summer whenever someone pulled a ball out wide to my forehand that caused some trouble for me, I would resort to a sliding squash shot. Recently, I found myself to be hitting more running forehands and now have completely forgot how to hit a squash shot.

What do you guys think is a more beneficial shot to use. A squash shot will buy you more time when you are on the defensive because it is more like a flat slice and you can stretch out more to reach it. A running forehand on the other hand gives more variety but chances are the ball will come back if you do not hit a straight out winner. In addition, the ball must be reachable to hit it.

Thoughts? Pros and cons of each shot?

Use the running forehand if you think you have time to turn the shoulders, hip load and drive through the ball while on the run.

If the ball is coming too fast and is about to bounce past you, then hit the squash shot because it requires less preparation.

mxmx
12-11-2012, 06:49 AM
maybe this?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stQ-fbwMVDs

martini1
12-11-2012, 07:19 PM
^^Nicely done. I want to learn that.

LeeD
12-11-2012, 07:23 PM
Instead of copying that vid, I'd take a gander at KimClister's and NovakDjokovic hitting squash shot forehands with an open stance doing the splits.
Federer and Murray also use it, as does Nadal. All with open stances that allow them to cover back to court for position recovery.

martini1
12-11-2012, 09:19 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRhEdF-GVkg

Basically it's a forehand slice.

Thx, pal. 10chars...

crazygamer2091
12-11-2012, 09:36 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYE6x8R-g38

More or less what Gael pulls at 0:26 but not as extreme. People usually hit the shot moving sideways, not running backwards like Monfils.

3fees
12-12-2012, 09:27 AM
On Running forehands where your pushed to get there, alls i know is the net has grown higher and have to hit the ball more under it to get it safely over the net no matter where your aiming it, hopefully your hitting the ball to the open court so you can recover versus hitting a cupcake to your opponent for his /her easy put away.

:)

LeeD
12-12-2012, 11:16 AM
While net doesn't get higher as you run wide to cover wide shots, the net distance increases a bit. Go CC for long court AND lowest possible net, or go DTL for a desperation winner/forcing ball.