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View Full Version : The Future: Flipping the Classroom


wihamilton
11-28-2012, 04:03 AM
Morning folks -

Just posted this in another thread but I thought this topic of discussion was deserving of one all to itself.

Check out this 60 Minutes interview:

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7401696n

It profiles Khan Academy and an innovative concept called "flipping the classroom," which I think is an important concept for our community moving forward. I believe this concept brings some clarity to the proper relationship between online and offline lessons.

So let me know what you think. More perspectives the better. Players, coaches, etc.

- Will

LuckyR
11-28-2012, 07:27 AM
Morning folks -

Just posted this in another thread but I thought this topic of discussion was deserving of one all to itself.

Check out this 60 Minutes interview:

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7401696n

It profiles Khan Academy and an innovative concept called "flipping the classroom," which I think is an important concept for our community moving forward. I believe this concept brings some clarity to the proper relationship between online and offline lessons.

So let me know what you think. More perspectives the better. Players, coaches, etc.

- Will


When posting a > 10 minute video, it would help to add a somewhat detailed synopsis and more importantly your take on it, since there is no shortage of random videos, and we are more interested in your opinion on it, since you are known here.

Naturally since it is 60 Minutes, many will have watched it in real time, but that show has slipped a lot, both in ratings and quality.

My take on the first 2 minutes I watched is that since it doesn't address the major issue with education, namely motivation, it is an excellent resource for those who seek it out, who are, naturally exactly those who are going to succeed anyway. Why? because in order to get the feed they have to seek it out, which means they are already motivated and immune to the biggest negative with modern education.

Neat tool, unlikely to make a major difference in it's current form. To be honest having struggling teachers view it (as opposed to struggling students) would likely be a better use.

sureshs
11-28-2012, 08:33 AM
I have heard a lot about it, and looked at two videos now: a calculus topic and a chemistry topic.

In the calculus one, the instructor wastes time trying to make a digital pen work in order to draw a graph.

I have watched many many educational programs on various TV channels. MIT is also putting all their lectures for free on the Internet.

There are various problems with this approach. A lecture is good to listen to once (in a physical or virtual classroom), but it is inefficient for later study as it takes too much time. It is much more efficient to read the details from a textbook than listening to the same material in a lecture (and the lecture material is usually much less than the textbook material).

Also, having someone lecture to you in not the best way to learn. Once the lecture has been heard, it is better to go off and read and think for yourself.

The real benefits will come if lectures on difficult topics from eminent teachers in top Universities are available. It does make a difference in the tough topics as to who is lecturing. That is why the Feynman lectures in Physics from the 60s (in book form) are so popular - they provided a direct glimpse into the way he thought about problems. I don't see the same value in a high school algebra video because all the teachers and textbooks all around the world are fundamentally interchangeable. (That is not to denigrate the teachers.)

WildVolley
11-28-2012, 08:35 AM
I saw that interview with Khan a while ago.

There's definitely an advantage to the video instruction in that the student can watch it at his own pace, rewind to watch important information again and use visual clues.

My tennis has been most influenced by the good quality slow motion video of the pros. Even though I'm pretty good at analyzing what I see on my own, there is still going to be a place for another helpful eye, so there's always going to be a roll, even for motivated students for real coaches to be more than just ball machines. Even on straightforward analysis, a lot of people don't see or get the same thing.

sureshs
11-28-2012, 08:41 AM
I saw that interview with Khan a while ago.

There's definitely an advantage to the video instruction in that the student can watch it at his own pace, rewind to watch important information again and use visual clues.

My tennis has been most influenced by the good quality slow motion video of the pros. Even though I'm pretty good at analyzing what I see on my own, there is still going to be a place for another helpful eye, so there's always going to be a roll, even for motivated students for real coaches to be more than just ball machines. Even on straightforward analysis, a lot of people don't see or get the same thing.

Oh yes, for sports, videos are extremely useful. I don't the value in other disciplines though. I tried to make my son watch some math videos in middle school (from Netflix, when I was a member) and it wasn't worth the time. He was much better off going through the textbook and working on some problems on his own.

WildVolley
11-28-2012, 08:41 AM
Video instruction is very good for tennis, especially it is easier to learn a new movement by mimicking a video than by reading a description and trying to apply it.

I find it less useful to argue about "snapping the wrist" or "pronating" than to study in slow motion what the best are actually doing and then try to copy that movement. Reading about how to hit a modern forehand usually just leaves me confused. But give me a visual model and I can adopt those same movement patterns.

WildVolley
11-28-2012, 08:44 AM
Oh yes, for sports, videos are extremely useful. I don't the value in other disciplines though. I tried to make my son watch some math videos in middle school (from Netflix, when I was a member) and it wasn't worth the time. He was much better off going through the textbook and working on some problems on his own.

I definitely agree with you if the textbooks are good. I've always thought of Khan's stuff as sort of an adjunct to a good textbook. I've found that many textbooks offer too few examples. They'll introduce a principle or mathematical rule and then give a single example. I find that the average student needs about five or ten worked examples to start to grasp the concept.

sureshs
11-28-2012, 09:00 AM
I definitely agree with you if the textbooks are good. I've always thought of Khan's stuff as sort of an adjunct to a good textbook. I've found that many textbooks offer too few examples. They'll introduce a principle or mathematical rule and then give a single example. I find that the average student needs about five or ten worked examples to start to grasp the concept.

That is why it is important to use more than one textbook for each subject, and something like a study guide or Schaum's series type of material for more examples.

wihamilton
11-28-2012, 09:04 AM
Nice comments so far. One "educational" website that I use and you might find helpful is:

http://www.lumosity.com/

Keeps me sharp =)

sureshs
11-28-2012, 09:23 AM
Nice comments so far. One "educational" website that I use and you might find helpful is:

http://www.lumosity.com/

Keeps me sharp =)

Became a member now