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View Full Version : Wrist - Firm or Loose


bhallic24
12-09-2012, 08:06 AM
on the forehand and serve before you make contact with the ball? I know that afterwards, its supposed to be relaxed to let the wrist "slap" the ball and have a natural followthrough.

dominikk1985
12-09-2012, 09:00 AM
loose wrist but firm grip:)

boramiNYC
12-09-2012, 10:47 AM
loose and firm all at the same time..actually this is not the best way to think. loose enough so the natural swing path of wrist is not obstructed but firm enough the racquet stays only on that swing path and not get derailed. understanding that swing path of wrist clearly is much more important.

LeeD
12-09-2012, 10:50 AM
Forehand, firmer for half volley pickups like short hops and flat attempt winners.
Serves, always a semi loose grip tight enough to hold the racket in your hand.

TheCheese
12-09-2012, 07:46 PM
Just firm enough to keep the racket on the path you want. Too firm and you lose power, too loose and you're all over the place.

TomT
12-09-2012, 08:32 PM
on the forehand and serve before you make contact with the ball? I know that afterwards, its supposed to be relaxed to let the wrist "slap" the ball and have a natural followthrough.I think this thread has helped me to have a sort of eureka moment. My wrist has been too stiff. After reading this thread I tried some shadow swings. Yep, that's it (I think). That's been one of my problems. Loosening my wrist action (re serve and especially forehands) will, I predict, result in better hitting (re serve and forehand). Thanks to OP and all posters.

(My other main problems are proper footwork to get proper distance from ball for proper arm extension on both forehand and backhand. And follow through. Hmmm. Seems like that pretty much covers everything. I have a LOT of work to do.)

Roddick85
12-10-2012, 04:31 AM
Hitting with a loose wrist generates more pace and spin in my opinion. If you hit with too stiff of a wrist, odds are your not maximizing the potential for your forehand or any of your ground strokes. The only situation where I say a stiff wrist could be of any use, is when you just want to block a hard serve. Otherwise you need to loosen up your grip/wrist. Of course you still have to be solid enough so that you don't drop your racquet. You should look up some Federer forehand video's, he's good a very loose wrist when he hits his forehand, you can actually see the racquet being far behind when he initiates his swing.

mxmx
12-10-2012, 05:46 AM
loose grip always, except on contact - works for me

TomT
12-12-2012, 07:58 PM
Was working out today. Yeah, looser wrist and grip, mostly wrist, is resulting in effortless 95 mph serves. Which is fast enough to cause players at my level (3.0 to 3.5) some problems, while avoiding or at least minimizing any problems caused by vibration to my hand and wrist. I've been serving fast serves (for my level) that impart virtually no vibrational feedback to my hand and wrist.

I didn't realize before how tight I was hitting. Looser is the way to better, cleaner hitting, in my current opinion.

ericwong
12-13-2012, 12:14 AM
I used to stiffen up my wrist when making contact the ball while rallying until I've got Tennis elbow. After reading some of the posts here, it makes sense to me to loosen up the wrist so as not to absorb much pressure especially when the shots are fast and full of depth. Now, I loosen up my upper body and use my unit turn to generate the power while keeping my arms and wrist loose. The only part I held firm is the grip of the racquet.

isilra
12-13-2012, 03:50 AM
on the forehand and serve before you make contact with the ball? I know that afterwards, its supposed to be relaxed to let the wrist "slap" the ball and have a natural followthrough.

As loose as possible all the time. This is the only way to create the lagging movement of the racquet and a natural follow through. You hold the racquet firm enough that it will not drop off your hands but never ever squeeze it.

Pros also do one thing more. They pronate their wrist at the moment of contact. That will provide 2 things; first you create much more spin, second you will add your forearm and wrist to your kinetic chain and provide extra power. A lot of people try to do that by squeezing the racquet at the moment of contact. But forehand wrist pronation is a very hard thing to do correctly, also doesn't mean too much as you are not playing in atp tour. So it's better don't have any stress in your forearm and wrist and play totally relaxed.