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Roddick85
12-17-2012, 05:09 AM
I've always wondered, how many variations of a particular ground stroke do you guys have? What about the pro's?

During a match, do you vary your forehand/backhand? For example, going from loopy (top spin) to a flatter stroke or vice-versa or do you always stick to the same stroke no matter what? What about power? Do pro's always hit maximum amount of power in every forehand/backhand?

It's hard to judge when your watching a pro match, with the camera angle, it always seems like they're hitting the same stroke and since they hit so well, it always comes off as if they're hitting close to 90%-100% of they're strength.

I'm asking the question because it's something I've always wondered and I want to improve my game. I tend to hit too hard, with maybe 6-7 inches of net clearance max which is very error prone.When i'm having a great day, it works great, but when it doesn't, I tend to loose badly and it affects my confidence.

I had my forehand analyzed by my coach last week. Since I don't have a very high net clearance, I thought I didn't put enough top spin. He told me that I have a lot of top spin already (which I find hard to believe) and that my C loop was good, but that perhaps I should just try to slow down my swing a bit because I tend to hit very close to the baseline. Trying to slow down my swing has always been something I've struggled with, I naturally swing fast, and i'm afraid that if I slow down my swing, my opponent will attack my strokes more, making me play more defense, which isn't my game.

I have exactly the same issue with my 1hbh.

In the end, I want to change my game to be a bit more consistent, but at the same time, I don't want to turn into one of those loopy/moon-balling type of players, playing a defensive game isn't my natural style. Any suggestions?

5263
12-17-2012, 07:39 AM
In the end, I want to change my game to be a bit more consistent, but at the same time, I don't want to turn into one of those loopy/moon-balling type of players, playing a defensive game isn't my natural style. Any suggestions?

There is plenty of room between those 2 extremes for you to work on.
The best players don't live at either extreme you mention.
Consider trying to add your swing speed later in your stroke. Most tend to
start speeding up the racket way too early in the swing. See if that can help,
to line it up better, then accel the racket.
Are you dragging the stick butt first at the start?

slowfox
12-17-2012, 07:46 AM
Variety is good. If your shots are the same (for the most part) all the time, your opponent can possibly get into a groove and then handle even the best of your shots. Variety can keep your opponent off rhythm. My 2 cents.

user92626
12-17-2012, 02:10 PM
Hey OP,

I had wondered the same things and over the years I have learned that you pretty much attempt to hit the same stroke that you feel familiar with. However, with competency and skills developed over time, you can vary the spin, net clearance, power and have better sense of placemen. Thus, comes variety. Everything seems automatic, second nature to you. For example, you tend to hit a tad harder with xcourt shot (because you feel there's a lot of room) or put more topsin on dtl shot.

As with any sport, pros compete on their strength/athleticism so they do hit with all their strength but obviously within their skills and the result they aim for. We, recreational players, should follow the same concept. Take what you know and can do and do it at your max strength to outdo your opponents. Most of my weekend players are not aware of this. They are too preoccupied with many techniques and howto's. To beat them I only have to go all out with my FH and that's it. Maybe this is why I never develop anything else!!! LOL.

Bagumbawalla
12-17-2012, 04:12 PM
In my opinion, consistancy comes from getting into (as much as possible) the same position in relation to the ball every time. Once you have done that- it does not mean you have to hit the ball exactly the same way every time- in fact, it increases your options.

Once I am set up in position to hit the ball (forehand or backhand) it is almost as if the ball seems (to me)motionless, suspended in space, and I decide what I want to do. At that point I can hit flat, go for tons of spin, hit a "moonball", a lob-whatever the situation requires. However, if you are not set up, not in position, in some awkward situation- then your choices become limited and your execution questionable.

enishi1357
12-17-2012, 04:36 PM
i can hit many type of spin depends on which swing path i am using (for example, reverse etc. I never intend to hit topspin unless i am messing around.

Roddick85
12-18-2012, 03:53 AM
Thanks for the answers everyone

LeeD
12-19-2012, 11:34 AM
Instead of slowing down your swing, you should SHORTEN your backswing, so the backswing only goes just behind the side of your body, instead of the normal behind your body backswing. This gives you a reliable rally ball with a normal swing speed.

Roddick85
12-19-2012, 01:43 PM
Instead of slowing down your swing, you should SHORTEN your backswing, so the backswing only goes just behind the side of your body, instead of the normal behind your body backswing. This gives you a reliable rally ball with a normal swing speed.

If I start doing this, it's going to mess my C loop no?

dominikk1985
12-19-2012, 02:55 PM
If I start doing this, it's going to mess my C loop no?

there you have your answer:).

All modern players use some form of loop (getting the racket up before swinging it down to the ball). however some have a very flat loop that almost looks like the old school straight takeback (like federer) and some have a huge loop (like moya or gonzalez). the size of the loop doesn't really matter as most power is delivered by the core rotation anyway. A slight loop does help making the stroke more fluent but a larger loop doesn't mean harder hitting.

federer does hit just as hard as gonzalez despite using a small loop.