PDA

View Full Version : Using demanding heavy rackets


zorg
08-23-2005, 10:39 PM
I wonder sometimes, is it stupid to use a demanding, heavy racket like the nCode 90? I mean, people are using a lot of power these days, using Babolats. Would it be murder going against these people with the nCode 90, plus additional lead taping. This is approximetly 12.5 oz. Or, do many pros use this weight of racket and it is very common? All I know is, people in my town don't really use heavy rackets, is that true everywhere?

Nadal_Rulz
08-24-2005, 12:14 AM
i hear ya. I think i'm like the only kid in my grade thats uses a real player's racquet. All these kids are using like pure drives and w/e and im ripping out my 12.5 oz tour 10's which is by the way a GREAT racquet,especially with gut hybrid

diredesire
08-24-2005, 12:18 AM
I wonder sometimes, is it stupid to use a demanding, heavy racket like the nCode 90? I mean, people are using a lot of power these days, using Babolats. Would it be murder going against these people with the nCode 90, plus additional lead taping. This is approximetly 12.5 oz. Or, do many pros use this weight of racket and it is very common? All I know is, people in my town don't really use heavy rackets, is that true everywhere?

it can be stupid sometimes, for example: a beginning player using a 90si racquet that has no sense of stroke mechanics. However, a heavier frame can do a few things for you, it can give you slightly improved arm safety, give you better ability to block shots back (more inertia), help you handle big pace, etc.

However, some people do not ABSOLUTELY need a heavy/players frame. The mentality on the boards is to go with the über player's frames, do or die. I think this is fine in it's own right, but to recommend a heavier, flexier frame to EVERYONE is just plain wrong. It is appropriate in some cases to suggest racquets that are more powerful. As far as weight goes, 12.5 isn't extreme, and it will (in my experience) promote proper preparation and force you to focus on the ball better.

Also: regarding power... you can generate a ton of it with a heavy small headed frame, you can also generate a ton of it with a huge snowshoe racquet. It all depends on stroke mechanics/production. Some frames are naturally more suited to supply "power" than others, but doesn't mean you will be unable to with your frame.

Nadal_Rulz
08-24-2005, 12:23 AM
i wasn't saying that 12.5 is extreme,but i thinkl it;s fairly heavy for a 14 year old kid.

BreakPoint
08-24-2005, 12:30 AM
i wasn't saying that 12.5 is extreme,but i thinkl it;s fairly heavy for a 14 year old kid.

I used a 14 oz. wood racquet when I was 14 years old, so 12.5 oz. should be nothing for anyone, except for maybe 90 year old grandmothers.

BreakPoint
08-24-2005, 12:37 AM
I wonder sometimes, is it stupid to use a demanding, heavy racket like the nCode 90? I mean, people are using a lot of power these days, using Babolats. Would it be murder going against these people with the nCode 90, plus additional lead taping. This is approximetly 12.5 oz. Or, do many pros use this weight of racket and it is very common? All I know is, people in my town don't really use heavy rackets, is that true everywhere?

Excuse me for asking, but are you a pro? If not, then what do what pros use have anything to do with what you use? Yes, it is common for pros to use 13 oz. racquets, but that doesn't mean recreational players should use the same racquets. Use what works for your game and for your ability level. Using a pro's racquet doesn't mean you're going to play like a pro or even win any matches. In fact, you're likely to lose more with a heavy pro's racquet than with one that's more suitable for your level and game.

156MPHserve
08-24-2005, 12:56 AM
Well, the thing about choosing racquets is, you usually don't get to try everything out there. Especially with kids, if you're lucky you'll have an educated father who suggests you should demo some racquets. The cost is well worth it when you choose the racquet right for you. However the truth is most people will save up the required amount of money and go to a store determined to make a purchase. They buy what they think is best for them, or what they see their favorite pro using, or what a friend/sales person recommends. My experience is, most people only consider either a light flexy frame, or a stiff heavy players frame a good usable one. Most people probably will not have a chance to try out a 11 oz 100 sq. inch Babolat and then a 13 oz 90 sq inch Wilson and take their pick. Most likely they are steered towards one or the other and is unable to change for a long period of time. I think most people will find success in one or the other type of frame, however they may not always be lucky enough to find it on a first try. Some never get a 2nd try.