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Centropolis
08-29-2005, 07:05 AM
I currently have a Wilson Prostaff 4.0 with Hammer System that I bought about 5 years ago. Back then, I didnít know much about tennis and just bought it because it was on sale. I played a few time with it and then gave up tennis for 5 years playing soccer.

I recently started to play tennis again and I realized that this racquet is not for me. Too head heavy which makes it hard for me to time my swings. I guess the swing weight is too heavy. I often hit the frame instead of the sweetspot. And if I do hit it, the ball will either hit the net or be too long.

I am looking to buy a new racquet. Iíve read that head heavy racquets are not really for beginner-intermediate level players (in general) anyways.

The dilemma I have is which ones to choose. There are obviously a lot of choices but I want a racquet that can work for a beginner/intermediate player that I can grow withÖ..so that I donít have to buy a new one next year.

I was looking at the Prince TT Scream OS racquet, which Iíve read is for intermediate level players. But a local store also sells the older Head I Radical and LM Radical for a very cheap price. I understand that the Radicals are for more experienced players but can they work for me as well? Cuz I know it should last me a while if I pick the right one. But if I go out and get a cheapy $60 racquet, I may find it not working if I improve my game.

Also, can someone tell me if there are any significant improvements from the iRadicals to the LM Radicals? The reviews seem to say that the improvements are worth to go with the LM. Any comments?

Help me!

Mies
08-29-2005, 07:15 AM
Iíve read that head heavy racquets are not really for beginner-intermediate level players (in general) anyways.

Well, if you look at the Wilson line, they sell light, head heavy rackets as beginners/granny sticks (N1, N3 etc.). I tend to lean towards the "play with what you feel comfortable with" opinion.

I learned to play (as an 8 year old kid) with heavy frames. I started playing with Major Topshot and Tomkat frames (both headlight, over 12 oz., 95 sq inch heads) at the age of 13-14. I don't think anyone would think of advising a kid of that age to pick up one of those things now.

My point is, play with what you like and feel comfortable with. For me, that has always been heavy, headlight frames, even as a kid. I don't necessarily believe in "beginners" and "advanced" frames. At my club, there is a 4.0-4.5 singles player (in his 30's) wielding a Triad 3.0 and some of the older geezers still wield pro staff classics.... Whatever works for you.

I think it would depend more on your type of swing (long, loopy or short, compact) as to what racket would fit you and not so much your absolute level.

Regards,
Maurice

stoneheart
08-29-2005, 07:28 AM
Centropolis-

I honestly think you are overemphasing the racquet aspect of tennis. If you're beginner level, you're still learning footwork and movement, and at any level they are far bigger factors of whether a shot is successful or not than the racquet or strings.

I'd suggest just getting some lessons instead of buying a racquet. Plenty of people learn the game with a head-heavy racquet. In fact, head-heavy racquets are usually designed for lower level players since they give more power and make the game easier for players with less efficient strokes.

Centropolis
08-29-2005, 07:42 AM
Centropolis-

I honestly think you are overemphasing the racquet aspect of tennis. If you're beginner level, you're still learning footwork and movement, and at any level they are far bigger factors of whether a shot is successful or not than the racquet or strings.

I'd suggest just getting some lessons instead of buying a racquet. Plenty of people learn the game with a head-heavy racquet. In fact, head-heavy racquets are usually designed for lower level players since they give more power and make the game easier for players with less efficient strokes.

Hmm.....I think you're right to a degree. I should focus more on the playing aspect of the game. However, I do think that getting a racquet that I can handle and feel better when swinging will help in learning as well.

Do you think so?

stoneheart
08-29-2005, 07:53 AM
It just depends. Any racquet has quirks that you have to adapt to in order to be successful. You can indeed purchase a head-light frame but you may find your new racquet might be too low-powered for your current racquet head speed - so you might be trading off power for manuverability. Furthermore, the Scream racquet you are eyeing is definitely meant for beginners/low intermediates. It's too light to handle easily big pace or spin coming off the frame of a good player, but again that's just a factor you have to adapt to.

Look, by all means, get a new stick if you want. New equipment is fun. But I wouldn't look at acquiring a new racquet as a real improvement-making step. You're going to have to spend hours of court time dialing in with your new stick and adjusting to it, getting your muscle memory to learn what a good shot feels like under stress with the racquet.

Improvement comes only from practice and fitness and coaching. Equipment comprises perhaps 1% of the game. Given that ratio, it makes more sense to invest in the other components.

As a final note, I currently play with a Volkl C10 with lead tape added to make it about 3 points head-heavy. I have no problems with timing with this setup.

Marius_Hancu
08-29-2005, 07:54 AM
I'd suggest you to buy one of those LM Radical (Mid, not OS) on sale at your place. Heavy enough, top light, not too stiff, 98sqin, enough even for a beginner. I.Radicals might be too light IMO.

I know many people satisfied with the Radicals, still check the comparative reviews at the top of this forum.

Guillote
08-29-2005, 08:54 AM
I would buy the LM or i.Radicals (Oversize or Midplus). At my club there are 12 year old kids using it, so that's an example that it is not very demanding.

For the price they are being sold they are a very good deal. And they will let you grow in the game.

Centropolis
08-29-2005, 10:17 AM
I'd suggest you to buy one of those LM Radical (Mid, not OS) on sale at your place. Heavy enough, top light, not too stiff, 98sqin, enough even for a beginner. I.Radicals might be too light IMO.

I know many people satisfied with the Radicals, still check the comparative reviews at the top of this forum.


Why not the OS? Also, is there a more complete comparisons between the Radicals? The LM is only $30 more than the older i Radicals at my store.

nViATi
08-29-2005, 10:19 AM
If you can't even hit the sweetspot with a hammer then it's got to be your technique that needs fixing.

azak
08-29-2005, 11:11 AM
Come on... Its just great buying rackets :D

Isn't it?

I still can focus on my tennis, but why dont buy a racket..? :D