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View Full Version : Who says lightweight frames are for beginners?


netman
08-29-2005, 03:35 PM
Just finished playing in an open doubles tournament. Players ranged in skill from USTA 3.5 to 4.5. After the dust settled the finals were played by a two teams consisting of 4.5 players. Interestingly, 3 of the 4 were using "granny" sticks. One Hammer H4, one monster Head (looked like a snowshoe), and a Prince Thunderlite OS. Sole "player's" frame was a Radical Ti Midplus. I had the pleasure of playing against both teams and believe me they could hit any shot and serve with ease. The topspin these guys generated was insane.

I keep seeing more and more sub 11 oz. frames. The recreational game is truly evolving toward lighter equipment.

-k-

Redflea
08-29-2005, 04:26 PM
Yeah...for doubles I would definitely agree...I also see lots of light sticks like the Thunderlight OS. However, I do still see a higher percentage of heavier frames in the singles side, though that seems to be trending lighter as well.

The whole weight debate gets pretty silly sometimes...one one extreme, some people seem to have a macho attitude around how heavy their frame is, and then you'll have others (a zealot friend of mine is a good example) who claims that anyone who plays w/a stick that weighs more than 10.5 oz is a fool. :-)

Champion
08-29-2005, 04:59 PM
Its not that uncommon for people to use a lighter racquet for doubles, i use a 13oz for singles and a 10.5 for doubles (which i rarely play).

goober
08-29-2005, 07:15 PM
and then you'll have others (a zealot friend of mine is a good example) who claims that anyone who plays w/a stick that weighs more than 10.5 oz is a fool. :-)

So your friend thinks that the almost all 5.0-7.0 players are fools?

bluegrasser
08-30-2005, 05:31 AM
I say whatever works for ya _ but it is FOOLISH to copy what the world class players use, because they hit a much heavier ball + they're much stronger ( wrists forearms etc..) than the average Joe..

goober
08-30-2005, 05:43 AM
I say whatever works for ya _ but it is FOOLISH to copy what the world class players use, because they hit a much heavier ball + they're much stronger ( wrists forearms etc..) than the average Joe..

yeah but do you really think that a racquet weighing 10.5 oz or more is too heavy and should be used only by world class players? You really don't have to be strong to use a racquet in the 11-12 oz range. The average adult male should be able to easily hit with a racquet in that range. I have tried light weight racquets and they are fine for playing below 4.0 level players. Once you start playing somebody who can hit the ball hard that 10 oz racquet is going to not hold up.

Redflea
08-30-2005, 08:36 AM
So your friend thinks that the almost all 5.0-7.0 players are fools?

Well, not all of them. Just the ones with heavy racquets. ;-)

I exaggerated his position a bit to make a point, that there isn't a one-size fits all answer.

kreative
08-30-2005, 09:24 AM
I have tried light weight racquets and they are fine for playing below 4.0 level players. Once you start playing somebody who can hit the ball hard that 10 oz racquet is going to not hold up.

Myth, I've seen many 4.5-5.5's using Hammer racquets (weighing under 10 oz) or some of the Head "snowshoes" (eg. Ti S6, i.S12) and are able to play well against guys who blast serves @ 110+, or w/ powerful strokes.

AndrewD
08-30-2005, 03:53 PM
You've just got to go with the racquet that accentuates your strengths and doesn't add on to your weaknesses.

I play only doubles now but use a midsize racquet (1987 Prestige Pro) strung quite loosely and weighing in at a bit over 12.6 ounces. That isn't the norm by a long way, however, I rely on hitting a very heavy, flat shot plus approach shots with a lot of penetration and need the extra weight so that when I lean into the ball I'll have something very solid and very stable behind my shot.

If my technique and strengths were different then Im sure my choice of racquet and weight would be vastly different as well. My occassional doubles partner uses a stock Dunlop 300G which comes in at under 11 ounces. He's formerly the top ranked player in the state and has played on the satellite circuit so you'd figure he knows what he's doing. He prefers a lighter racquet and does a pretty good job of using it.

Dont see myself still swinging a 12.6 ounce midsize frame in my 40's though. If you want to still be competitive as you get older you do have to get smarter with your equipment and accept all of the help on offer.

bamboo
08-30-2005, 03:59 PM
Myth, I've seen many 4.5-5.5's using Hammer racquets (weighing under 10 oz) or some of the Head "snowshoes" (eg. Ti S6, i.S12) and are able to play well against guys who blast serves @ 110+, or w/ powerful strokes.
I agree - Mojo once posted how he hit with a top junior while using a Cat4 (10.2) and he had no trouble with the speed of the shots.