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jeebeesus
02-25-2004, 02:53 PM
what book should i read so that i can coach a player to tournament level? thanks

Verbal_Kint
02-25-2004, 02:58 PM
Winning Ugly by Brad Gilbert should be compulsory.

Marnix

mattlikovich
02-25-2004, 06:08 PM
inner game of tennis by timothy gallaway(i think)
and maximum tennis by nick saviano

C_Urala
02-26-2004, 01:19 AM
Really strange subject.
If it were just a couple of books, nobody would need a coach at all...
These books may be good, but to raise a player to a tournament level... there is a lot more there.

Cypo
02-26-2004, 02:25 AM
Coaching Tennis by Wardlaw
The Mental Game By Brandon

jayserinos99
02-26-2004, 03:08 AM
Like any class, you need to study (by reading the books), doing the homework (practicing strokes, matchplay, etc.) and by passing the midterms and finals (playing tournaments). All of these books are great suggestions, but to really coach a player, you have to be able to identify your player's weaknesses and strengths, scout other players and have your player be able to adjust to the other players.

Bungalo Bill
02-26-2004, 11:24 AM
Those are all excellent books. The book I refer to the most in my library is Scott Williams SMART tennis. This is a complete tennis system to help a student grow to a top tournament player. The thing I like most about it is it is a system that the student can learn and use himself when coaching is not available during the match. I use the other books as support to this system.

jeebeesus
02-26-2004, 02:18 PM
Thank You for the input Fellas. Where we are we don`t have pros visiting us so we can learn from them. So therefore we do the best we can. Hence the books. Inner Tennis, Serious Tennis, Winning Ugly and whatever helpful books we can get our hands on.

Bungalo Bill
02-26-2004, 04:47 PM
oh me bad, it is Serious Tennis by Scott Williams this is a must have for any serious tennis player. Sorry for the confusion.

jayserinos99
02-26-2004, 05:25 PM
I think TW sells this book, no?

Bungalo Bill
03-01-2004, 11:28 AM
yes, they do

larry10s
11-06-2010, 05:31 PM
thiis was the very first thread!!!
what would yoiu say now??

10s talk
11-07-2010, 06:57 AM
Really strange subject.
If it were just a couple of books, nobody would need a coach at all...
These books may be good, but to raise a player to a tournament level... there is a lot more there.


BINGO..... if all it took was to read a few books everyone would do it, it takes years of experience, mentors, seminars, videos, etc

GetBetterer
11-07-2010, 10:33 AM
As much as I advocate Winning Ugly or The Inner Game of Tennis, for somebody who doesn't have prior knowledge of tennis and how to hit the strokes, I would not recommend either.

Instead, have him/her be taught by a private coach to learn the strokes correctly. After he or she is a solid 4.0, then go read my thread that I linked in my signature.

Winning Ugly gives good tips for technical play, but The Inner Game of Tennis does a better mental job.

4sound
11-07-2010, 12:08 PM
There are many different aspects of coaching & it depends on the player/coach relationship and being able to coach level appropriately.

Some players need strategic coaching, some need more help with mechanics; some need coaches to reflect what they do on court to be more objective of their game and some higher level players want more scouting of their opponents to put together game plans to execute against.

There are a lot of great books mentioned but coaching has a lot of personal relationship aspects that I haven't really found in any books.

I recently read an article with Jose Higeras (sp?) which I thought was really good. He has a list of personal coaching principals. John Wooden's books also have great mental approaches to competition.

chico9166
11-07-2010, 01:02 PM
As much as I advocate Winning Ugly or The Inner Game of Tennis, for somebody who doesn't have prior knowledge of tennis and how to hit the strokes, I would not recommend either.

Instead, have him/her be taught by a private coach to learn the strokes correctly. After he or she is a solid 4.0, then go read my thread that I linked in my signature.

Winning Ugly gives good tips for technical play, but The Inner Game of Tennis does a better mental job.

Agreed. Can't imagine how these two books can help the layman too much. BG's book talks about shot patterns he help install into AGASSI"S game at the pro level, and the IGOT (feelings, emotions, and SH***) won't help much, if you can't hit the ball. Technique, technique, technique.

Some of the most notable:

Doug King (Tennisone)
John Yandell, Brian Gordon, Kerry Mitchell (Tennisplayer)
Jeff Counts (Hi Tech Tennis)
Fuzzy Yellow Balls
Nick Saviano
Oscar Wegner (MTM)
Jose Higueras

TennisCoachFLA
11-07-2010, 01:15 PM
If there is one single book that every tennis coach should read:

Coaching Tennis by Chuck Kriese.

Simply as good a book on the topic as has ever been written.

chico9166
11-07-2010, 01:17 PM
If there is one single book that every tennis coach should read:

Coaching Tennis by Chuck Kriese.

Simply as good a book on the topic as has ever been written.

This is true. Good one TCF.

papa
11-08-2010, 01:56 PM
I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned Dave Smith's books - Coaching Mastery is extremely good and very helpful.

GetBetterer
11-08-2010, 02:51 PM
papa:
I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned Dave Smith's books - Coaching Mastery is extremely good and very helpful.

I have never personally read it myself. I might go check it out sometime if they have it at my nearest library.

CoachingMastery
11-08-2010, 06:02 PM
I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned Dave Smith's books - Coaching Mastery is extremely good and very helpful.

Thanks for mentioning Coaching Mastery...a 405 page book that I wrote specifically for the OP.

It takes in my 35 years of coaching and teaching...and my father's methods, (Bruce Smith was my father...Calif. Coach of the year...National Coach of the Year, runner up), and together, we coached one of the winningest tennis teams in the country. (768 wins, 9 losses over a 22 year period in So. Calif...a pretty competitive area to win that consistently. At one point, we won 398 consecutive team league matches over an 11 year period.)

Coaching Mastery documents the ways a coach can attract players to their program, (as well as pros to their club or program), how to effectively train more than 50 students on a limited number of courts, how to motivate such players, how to avoid problems when coaching, and how to create perpetual championship teams.

Finally, the book also helps tennis parents as I've seen hundreds of parents unintentionally mess up their kids through ignorance and misunderstanding. (I've seen dozens of pros do the same, unfortunately!)

Hope that helps those looking for information. I've got over 110 books on tennis and there are obviously several good ones. I've tried to compile not only what my father and I were able to learn over the years, but also the good information found in many books and expounded by many speakers and pros I've met over the years.

Tennis Mastery and Coaching Mastery are both two of the top five selling books at TW...with Tennis Mastery the #2 top selling book for the past five years. (Coaching Mastery is #4 and I released it in 2008.)

The second edition of Tennis Mastery will hit the book shelves December.

papa
11-09-2010, 05:01 AM
Look, I am nothing more than a teaching pro associated with the USPTA. I have absolutely no financial, personal or professional relationship with Dave Smith - in other words I gain nothing by recommending his book.

If there was one book that players, coaches and instructors should have its his "Coaching Mastery". Although my tennis library probably isn't as complete as some (I have around forty books), I think his is without doubt my favorite and filled with material that everyone can/should use immediately.

CoachingMastery
11-09-2010, 09:11 AM
Many thanks for the unsolicited affirmation of Coaching Mastery, Papa.

I did want to mention the best place to order the book is here at TennisWarehouse. (Also, read the reviews of mine and other books for additional insight.)

I don't make the book available at bookstores as tennis books simply don't do well in general stores. (I am the author of the Mystery about Walt Disney titled HIDDEN MICKEY which IS in all the Barnes and Noble stores as well as on line in dozens of locations...so, it isn't about not being able to get my tennis books in stores! I just choose to market it on line here at TW as well as my own site, coaching-mastery.com.)

When my dad passed away in 1984 at the age of 55, I felt it was important to document his coaching philosophy, methods, and motivational tools since he left nothing behind other than those he coached over the years. (He was also one of the most successful high school football coaches in CA too!)

In reading so many other books, I felt they left out the ideas of how to build a team in terms of getting kids out for a program, (we averaged over 40 kids for each team every year), and then how to get the most out of them.

For too long, I had seen coaches cut players, (we never cut a single kid), only to be marginal teams year in and year out. Also, too many books didn't really show how to effectively coach a large number of kids...especially with limited courts and coaching staff. (We did it with only myself and one other coach...) Yet, we won year in and year out with a huge team. So, I wanted to share these points with readers who were willing or wanting to learn.

I applaud anyone who is willing to seek out help through books, professional certification programs, (my 10 years with the USPTA has taught me a lot too!) and other means. Too many coaches are too proud or think they know it all and never seek the expertise of others.

So, good luck to the OP and all who read this post for the reasons written!!

TennisCoachFLA
11-09-2010, 09:56 AM
Look, I am nothing more than a teaching pro associated with the USPTA. I have absolutely no financial, personal or professional relationship with Dave Smith - in other words I gain nothing by recommending his book.

If there was one book that players, coaches and instructors should have its his "Coaching Mastery". Although my tennis library probably isn't as complete as some (I have around forty books), I think his is without doubt my favorite and filled with material that everyone can/should use immediately.

I have always enjoyed your posts and the sound information. Sounds like I need to add Dave's book to my library so will order a copy. If you do not have Chuck Kriese's book yet, I highly recommend it.

papa
11-09-2010, 11:08 AM
I have always enjoyed your posts and the sound information. Sounds like I need to add Dave's book to my library so will order a copy. If you do not have Chuck Kriese's book yet, I highly recommend it.

Thanks. Actually I believe I have two of Chuck Kriese's books - former Clemson Men's Coach. I have a Clemson connection in the family and know a friend (college coach) of his. If I'm not mistaken, Chuck has just recently (last year or so) retired from Clemson.

TennisCoachFLA
11-09-2010, 12:47 PM
Thanks. Actually I believe I have two of Chuck Kriese's books - former Clemson Men's Coach. I have a Clemson connection in the family and know a friend (college coach) of his. If I'm not mistaken, Chuck has just recently (last year or so) retired from Clemson.

Yes he did retire in 2008. Then he went to Southeast Asia to coach and that was the last I heard about him.

I ordered Dave's book today. Looking forward to reading it.

papa
11-09-2010, 02:15 PM
Yes he did retire in 2008. Then he went to Southeast Asia to coach and that was the last I heard about him.

I ordered Dave's book today. Looking forward to reading it.

Good, you'll enjoy it.

Chuck and I have a mutual friend who wrote one of the "Forwards" for at least one of his books - Dave Fish, Mens Tennis Coach, Harvard University. Actually, we were associated with each other at Harvard.

TennisCoachFLA
11-17-2010, 11:39 AM
I am through the first 100 pages of Dave Smith's book Coaching Mastery. It is the best book on the subject I have ever read.

Thanks papa for the idea to buy it!

papa
11-17-2010, 01:52 PM
I am through the first 100 pages of Dave Smith's book Coaching Mastery. It is the best book on the subject I have ever read.

Thanks papa for the idea to buy it!

Yeah, good stuff isn't it. You'll find yourself going back to it many times for little tidbits here and there - great reference to have around.

TennisCoachFLA
11-17-2010, 06:06 PM
Yeah, good stuff isn't it. You'll find yourself going back to it many times for little tidbits here and there - great reference to have around.

His writing style is superb and he explains things very well. Even something as basic and important as getting kids into the continental grip right away for volleys and serves.

I can't tell you how few coaches actually get how important this is.

CoachingMastery
11-17-2010, 08:29 PM
His writing style is superb and he explains things very well. Even something as basic and important as getting kids into the continental grip right away for volleys and serves.

I can't tell you how few coaches actually get how important this is.

Coach, I am glad to hear you are getting some things from Coaching Mastery! It, of course, is flattering to hear the things you have said. Thank you.

Yes, one of the most failing commonalities among players who fail to advance, especially in talking about serves and volleys, slices and overheads, is the limited emphasis on the development of the continental grip. While the absolute pure use of the grip can be varied among pros, the bottom line is that all the best players, for the most part, learned from a foundation of the continental grip for these shots and later evolved this foundation within subtle variations.

Sounds like you know your stuff too! Best wishes for continued success! Hope the book provides you a few things to help you and your students reach that success!

TennisCoachFLA
11-17-2010, 08:43 PM
Coach, I am glad to hear you are getting some things from Coaching Mastery! It, of course, is flattering to hear the things you have said. Thank you.

Yes, one of the most failing commonalities among players who fail to advance, especially in talking about serves and volleys, slices and overheads, is the limited emphasis on the development of the continental grip. While the absolute pure use of the grip can be varied among pros, the bottom line is that all the best players, for the most part, learned from a foundation of the continental grip for these shots and later evolved this foundation within subtle variations.

Sounds like you know your stuff too! Best wishes for continued success! Hope the book provides you a few things to help you and your students reach that success!

Thanks Dave. I am just settling down now to my nights reading of the book. I actually used some of your tips at practice today with my own 6 year old.

CoachingMastery
11-18-2010, 06:06 AM
Thanks Dave. I am just settling down now to my nights reading of the book. I actually used some of your tips at practice today with my own 6 year old.

Terrific! There are many sections that fit training a six year old. My philosophy, (which has been proved successful beyond any doubt!), is that no matter what age, the foundation you build should be the same for most everyone. While there will be differences in the approach one would use with a child versus an adult, the goal of specific stroke, grip and footwork patterns should be the same.

If you haven't seen my series I did for TennisOne, ("Training an 8-Year Old") where I documented the actual training I did with my own daughter from start to finish...and showed what that training could produce in 12 months, you might want to see that, since it puts into real-time application all the basic nuts and bolts of my training philosophy from the book.

Good luck and again, I appreciate reading your response. It, of course, was the goal of writing such a comprehensive book, of giving pros, coaches, and parents a good resourse to draw optimal patterns to teach from.

Best wishes,

Dave Smith