PDA

View Full Version : What I did today - Workout


sanitarium
05-15-2004, 02:07 PM
This was my workout today, any comments / suggestions.

10 min jog, roughly 3 km.
Warm up of all major muscle groups (bi,tri,quadri ceps, pectorals, etc) with 5 lb dumbbells (10 curls, etc)

2 sets of 10 reps of 25 lb dumbell curls. (Biceps)
2 sets of 15 reps of 10lb dumbell. (triceps, raise from behind back to vertical, i.e serving)
2 sets of 10 reps of 115lb benchpress.

5:30 min bikeride, high resistance.

Tommorow i'm gonna do some squats and some back exercises, any suggestions for back exercises?

sanitarium
05-18-2004, 04:43 PM
also did some ab exercises.

Since no one is commenting (asses) i'll rephrase, is there anything lacking or should I be exercising something that isn't there for tennis?

Eric Matuszewski
05-18-2004, 08:28 PM
This depends on your goals.

If you want to gain muscle, you must get to failure (the point at which doing another rep is nearly impossible).

Learn to pay attention to your body and the feedback your body gives you.

You should have a pump (hard tight skin feeling in the muscles you worked) by your last set.

Moderate soreness (Delayed a day after a workout) is also a sign that you will grow.

Compound movements are the way to go. (movements that use many different large and small muscle groups as opposed to isolating a few small ones).

For your lower back do extensions. Some books call them hyperextensions. Use a stool to lean over with your hips centered face down on the stool, and hold your feet down by putting your heels under a table.

Pull ups are great for the Lats. And rowing with a broom handle between two sturdy chairs is a good compliment. The feet can be raised on a table/chair etc. to increase resistance.

Best Wishes

linli101
05-19-2004, 06:15 AM
3k in 10min? That's damn fast jogging.

Tomek
05-19-2004, 10:57 AM
If you want to gain muscle, you must get to failure (the point at which doing another rep is nearly impossible).

Learn to pay attention to your body and the feedback your body gives you.

You should have a pump (hard tight skin feeling in the muscles you worked) by your last set.

Moderate soreness (Delayed a day after a workout) is also a sign that you will grow.


I can't agree with you on few things:
- You don't have to get to failure on every workout! If you want to gain muscle weight you must have good diet and do workouts regularly. You have to change your routine every time you see that you are getting used to it... For growth muscles need regular and various stimulation. Sometimes obviously you can go to filature, but not to often. It's not necessary at all;
- You don't need a pump. What you should have is instant progress. Make sure that every workout is a little bit harder than the lat one. (also you can do something like 3 steps forward, one back to avoid overtraining);
-After few weeks of training it can be hard for you to have any soreness day after. But it doesn't mean that you train too light! Be careful because you can easily overtrain.

Also once for 6-8 weeks do 2 weeks of law pace training for instance HIT (for regeneration).

For more info I suggest visiting and reading some archives and forum polls from: www.t-mag.com

[/quote]

Eric Matuszewski
05-19-2004, 12:34 PM
I agree that the dangers of overtraining and injury are certainly important to consider.

Progress can occur at lower intensities and always training at high intensity increases the risks of injury/overtraining.

Anyone who gets into resistance training should be clear about his or her goals and what level of risk of overtraining is acceptable to reach them.

I've read reports that pump is not neccesary for growth and I've read many articles on periodization (varying workout intensity).

However, I've seen so many people do very half hearted workouts and quit when they don't see results, that it has biased me to emphasise higher intensity and getting measureable results (a pump, or failure).

Alow me to clarify what I mean by failure.
Failure at the end of a set does not mean not being able to move afterwards, It just means that you've fatigued the muscles you are training.

By reaching very small, measurable goals (like a pump after a workout) you will be encouraged to keep training. The mental effect of reaching small goals shouldn't be overlooked.

In the end the persons best chance is to learn to listen to his or her own body. You may get your best results on a program you create for yourself that is totally unique, more power to you.
there is certainly plenty of room for creativity and invention in excersise science.

Best Wishes,
Eric Matuszewski

Eric Matuszewski
05-19-2004, 12:47 PM
Taking regular tape circumference measurements along with photos are also important methods of determining weather you are reaching your goals or are overtraining.

If you find you are loosing arm circumference for instance after increasing your intensity. That would be a sign of possible overtraining.

You could then lower the intensity and see if you get bigger again.

keeping things measurable is key here.

polaroids or digital photos with dates on them also will help you find out if your getting into overtraining.

By keeping things measureable and adjusting your workouts accordingly you can find what is right for you.

Tomek
05-19-2004, 02:06 PM
Ok, now I see your point :) I have had a little bit different point of view. In Poland there is a lot of young people training too hard and overtrainig. 5 exercises for 4 sets and 10 reps, could be easily find for chest.
When weight training I do 3 days split. One day I go for maximal effort upper body, 2nd day I do maximal effor lower body. On the 3rd day I do dynamic exercises.
Also I do some throwing, stretching etc.