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Mladen
09-26-2005, 03:14 AM
Footwork is very important part of a game. I heard many times that good footwork is like a dance: you need to know an egzact footwork patterns for specific shots. Does somebody may describe proper footwork, on any way, for example:

- short distance onehanded BH: split, L, RL(shuffle), R, hit
- long distance onehanded BH: split, L, R, L, R, hit
- insideout forehand: split, L, RL(shuffle), RL(shuffle), hit
- short distance openstance forehand: ...
- long distance openstance forehand: ...

On revolutionarytennis.com you may see great diagrams on footwork, but based on forward stance and linear momentum. I'm interested in open stance and rotation as a power source. Thanks.

Marius_Hancu
09-26-2005, 07:31 AM
check the posting on Footwork by Noelle in the Sticky at the top of this forum, esp this thread:

forehand footwork
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?p=332168

joe sch
09-26-2005, 09:09 AM
Thanks for this post !
Soo many players dont consider how important proper footwork and hitting stances mean to advanced tennis.
A few things to consider in optimizing your footwork :
Shuffling is only efficient for short distance.
Man was built to run, not shuffle.
Best movement is performed on the balls of your feet.
Light quick steps are best for balance, timing and stroking.
Look at Federer today and Connors from yesterday for court mvmt.
Its not just footwork but how you carry your racket and incorporate your windups and followthru's while on the run ...
This is a topic for a much more detailed report ...

tom-selleck
09-26-2005, 09:44 AM
yeah, i think this is an area where there isn't enough material out there.

during U.S. open during a hewitt match, they mentioned how he's practically doing recovery steps as he hits the ball. i think this is absolutely critical especially at higher levels but nothing i'd thought about specifically.

would love any content, especially recovery steps.

Clayplay
09-27-2005, 03:49 AM
footwork is very important, but what is even more important is your positioning to the ball, and you need good footwork to position yourself well.
for an open stance forehand (if you're right handed), your right leg goes first for balance and then you step in with your left as you're about to hit the ball.
for inside out forehands you have to remember to to step back with your right foot(if you're righty) and then use an open stance when you're about to hit the ball; remember to go around the ball.
i believe that a closed stance is better for short balls than an open stance but some people prefer open stance

Noelle
09-27-2005, 05:19 AM
I found some links on footwork by searching for "gravity step"+tennis on Google. :) I read the term bandied about on other tennis and badminton instructional forums and wanted to find out what it meant. As far as I can tell, gravity steps can be used to enable faster movement to the ball, and faster recovery as well.

http://www.darrylcummings.com/darryl's%20writings/tennismoves.htm
(http://www.darrylcummings.com/darryl's%20writings/tennismoves.htm)
cross over step: Used for strong recovery and positioning back into the court. One leg will cross in front of the other leg allowing the player to return to proper court position in a quick and efficient manner.

gravity step: Dropping the foot closest to the ball in the direction away from the ball creating a surge of explosive movement. The move is used to allow the player to move to the ball the quickest and most efficient way possible.

fade away: Linear momentum moving in a direction other than forward, but hips rotating forward. This move is often seen when a player is running down a lob. The player will use this move in order to dip the ball at the feet of their opponents as they approach the net.

forward lean: Used for return of serve and ready position for volleying, gives player the opportunity to move on an angle forward and for using linear momentum during the hit. The forward lean allows the volley to be hit with the body with limited amount of swing. When used during return of serve the returner will have the opportunity to neutralize the serve.

reverse: Both feet are shuffled to the opposite direction in order to create a gravity lean in the desired direction. This move is usually used to neutralize a ball that was hit behind a player.

run through: Run through ball while coiling and uncoiling, used for concluding/hitting winners.

step up: Players back foot will pop around and break plane of front foot. Player usually will recover back after this move, good for stepping up and putting more pressure on the ball. This move is usually used to put the opponent on defense.
http://www.badmintoncentral.com/vb/showthread.php?t=1982
Yes, the player actually seems to take the intial step AWAY from the intended destination. This causes the player to be off balance and lean or tilt (due to the pull of gravity). I think I've also heard it referred to as a 'sprinter's step'. Visualize how a sprinter starts a race... on all fours. At the sound of the starting pistol, the sprinter pulls his/her hands away, thus putting them off balance. The are actually falling & off balance for the first few steps of the race but acclerate fairly quickly.

One can experience the effect with a simple demonstration. Stand sideways to a wall (about 1 meter away) with you feet about shoulder's width apart. Hold up the hand that is closest to the wall so that it is a few inches away from the wall. When you pick up the foot that is closest to the wall you should start to fall & accelerate toward the wall.

***

the topic is 'gravity step', and my definition is moving your feet in a way that cause 'loss of balance' in a control manner. if my definition is right (probably not), that's what i try to discript what i saw in badminton video tape. i also observe they use 'gravity step' on recovery after the stroke. it's good to learn more terminology.
Even though the original poster has already seen the Revolutionary Tennis sections on footwork, it may still bear some interest for other people viewing this thread.
http://www.revolutionarytennis.com/step2.html

Marius_Hancu
09-27-2005, 05:46 AM
http://www.darrylcummings.com/darryl's%20writings/tennismoves.htm

cross over step: Used for strong recovery and positioning back into the court. One leg will cross in front of the other leg allowing the player to return to proper court position in a quick and efficient manner.



This can be done both in front and at the back of the other leg (check Federer on recovery from sides). Some call it then "cross behind."

Marius_Hancu
09-27-2005, 09:50 AM
http://www.darrylcummings.com/darryl's%20writings/tennismoves.htm
(http://www.darrylcummings.com/darryl's%20writings/tennismoves.htm)

gravity step: Dropping the foot closest to the ball in the direction away from the ball creating a surge of explosive movement. The move is used to allow the player to move to the ball the quickest and most efficient way possible.



I think this should be changed to:

gravity step: Dropping the foot closest to the ball in order to create the opportunity to step across faster with the other foot.

Thus if the ball is coming to your left, you drop (when landing from split-step) your left foot under you and cross over quickly (over the left foot) in front with the right foot. The fact that your left foot as well as your gravity center is lower facilitates a faster crossover.

Those with a subscription at tennisplayer.net should check

First Two Steps:
The Key to Quickness
By Michael Friedman

which contains a section and a clip on Sampras doing the gravity step.

Mladen
09-29-2005, 01:43 AM
Its not just footwork but how you carry your racket and incorporate your windups and followthru's while on the run ...
Very true. Especially on 'uncomfortable' shots (deep, wide, time pressure...) manuevring the racket in a proper and efficient manner is the crucial.