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tennis6060
09-26-2005, 03:57 PM
When I play tennis I often feel that I am giving my opponent the benefit of the doubt on line calls too often. I want to be honest on line calls but I also want to win the points I am entitled to.

Sometimes I have trouble dustinguishing whether a ball was in or out and I get really frustrated when I lose a point on a ball that I was pretty sure my opponent hit out.

Do you have any tips about how I can change my game to better observe whether a ball is in or out?

Marius_Hancu
09-26-2005, 04:05 PM
just watch the ball to your best ability (which you should do anyway) and call it as honestly as you can do it.

check Watching the Ball in the Sticky at the top of this forum.

PM_
09-26-2005, 04:07 PM
Tip: Nice guys finish last.

Rickson
09-26-2005, 04:50 PM
When I play tennis I often feel that I am giving my opponent the benefit of the doubt on line calls too often. I want to be honest on line calls but I also want to win the points I am entitled to.

Sometimes I have trouble dustinguishing whether a ball was in or out and I get really frustrated when I lose a point on a ball that I was pretty sure my opponent hit out.

Do you have any tips about how I can change my game to better observe whether a ball is in or out?
Just play Raul and you'll be making calls the other way in no time.

Clayplay
09-27-2005, 02:04 AM
if you're preety sure the ball was out, then call it out because you have a better view than your opponent.

misterg
09-27-2005, 02:12 AM
[QUOTE=tennis6060] I want to be honest on line calls but I also want to win the points I am entitled to.
QUOTE]

If you want to be honest than you're doing right.

andreh
09-27-2005, 03:07 AM
I call balls that I'm sure are out. If there's any doubt call them good.

Thanatos
09-27-2005, 07:52 AM
When I play tennis I often feel that I am giving my opponent the benefit of the doubt on line calls too often. I want to be honest on line calls but I also want to win the points I am entitled to.

Sometimes I have trouble dustinguishing whether a ball was in or out and I get really frustrated when I lose a point on a ball that I was pretty sure my opponent hit out.

Do you have any tips about how I can change my game to better observe whether a ball is in or out?

This is partially due to a lack of confidence and focus. When you're not confident in your game, there is a tendency to doubt your shot and give your opponnent the "benefit" of the call. When you're not focusing or tracking the ball properly, it's makes it harder to clearly call the ball.

Sometimes I see this in my opponnets. I would hit a shot that's clearly out. My opponnent turns to me to ask "was the ball in?". My repsonse would be "if you are unsure then, the ball is in!"

To resolve this problem, I suggest:
1. Making the line call ASAP after the ball hits the ground. This will give you less time to think or doubt the shot. As more time elaspe (milliseconds), the more doubt will creep into your mind. The line call should be reactionary, then less cognitive processing.

2. Make a call and stick to it! If your opponnent questions the call. Have a firm response ready. For example, "Yes, the ball was clearly out!"

3. Practice tracking the ball better, meaning predicting were the ball will land once it gets to your side of the court. I'm still learning this visual technique. So far it has paid off. I have seen an improvement in getting to the ball quicker, making clean contact, and line calling.

Fatmike
09-27-2005, 08:13 AM
Happens to me too.... and often I put lots of spin on the ball and the oppnent is sure that the ball will go out and at last second it fall on the line.... 2 times out of 3 my opponent calls it out.... since I hate arguing, I let go most of the time... last year I told an opponent at the end of the match (that I won clearly but should have won by more) that the calls he made were often good in my opinion.... opponent start yeiiling at me, telling me I was not a fair player, that he would go to the club office to says that I was this and that.... I learned, so I don't fight for calls anymore....

Marius_Hancu
09-27-2005, 08:20 AM
To resolve this problem, I suggest:

1. Making the line call ASAP after the ball hits the ground. This will give you less time to think or doubt the shot. As more time elaspe (milliseconds), the more doubt will creep into your mind. The line call should be reactionary, then less cognitive processing.


yes, this is what I would recommend too.

dingo
09-27-2005, 11:36 PM
A few things I would add are that the ball stays in contact with the ground for about 3 milliseconds (1) and it rolls on the ground during this time for about 2 inches (2). So, no human actually sees the contact (1) and the contact of the ball with the ground occurs actually about 2 inches prior to the point at which it leaves the ground (2). What we make calls on is the interpolation of our brain. As such, in some experiments it has been established that most players miscall lines more often then not on non-running strokes (1) and on running strokes a player is legaly blind when it comes to seeing the ball impact (2). So, this makes the calls really up to our individual perception. If you feel one way and your opponent says the other way - go with your feeling, because neither of you have actually seen the impact (1) and you were closer to it (2). If you have mixed feelings on in-or-out -- you ought to call it in.

Geezer Guy
09-29-2005, 10:03 AM
Tennis6060, You're doing the right thing. If you're not POSITIVE the ball was OUT, play it as in. That's what you're supposed to do, and what your opponent should be doing for you. The more you play, the more you'll get used to seeing the ball. The line-calling get's easier over time, however, anytime you have a doubt then consider the ball in.