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FREDDY
10-02-2005, 01:51 PM
does anyone know the age of the latest starting age of becoming pro. most pros start from age 8 or even younger what is the oldest age known for an ATP player???

Grigollif1
10-02-2005, 02:42 PM
Freddy,

Ibelieve Younes El Aynaoui started at 12 , but he had an athletic folowing already...

All Court
10-02-2005, 03:11 PM
FREDDY, I think it's a little too late for you to turn pro, if you're considering it. Of course, if you're extremely, extremely talented like the world's never seen...forget this post, by all means go for it.

But...ask yourself this questions first:

"Am I very, very highly nationally ranked, doing well in tournaments, and hopefully (and probably, if you're really going pro) very, very high in international ITF tournaments?"

Remember that on average, out of the top 10 INTERNATIONALLY ranked juniors in the world, I believe about 57% go on to become top 100 in the ATP.

How long have you been playing? All pros, even if they didn't start tennis until 12 (if Aynaoui started then, that's already extremely late for tennis), build extreme coordination, speed, functional skills etc. at young ages. Their life is planned and periodized.

In short, I really don't want to burst your bubble, but there's no chance you can really compete on the pro tour (well, I don't know anything about you, but assuming from your question it sounds you started at around 14 or 15 and have been playing for less than two years).

If you're really, REALLY serious about tennis as a career (erm...good luck!), look into being an instructor and whatever else. But you should only really look into that if you have great communication skills, are friendly and make friends easily (especially with younger children), and whatever else. If you're like that, being a tennis instructor would be a GREAT job for you. It might help to establish some knowledge here, be able to help on all problems in the instruction section (keep in mind GOOD knowledge, and be able to answer almost everything, if you want a teaching job you need to be able to know everything on the spot), and be aware of fitness and other such things related to tennis performance.

Good luck.

Talent
10-02-2005, 03:49 PM
You need serious talent and/or extremely good work ethic, but you really need that no matter how early or late you begin. I believe Pancho Gonzalez started around El Aynaoui's time. Take a look in this thread, quite a few players mentioned started 'late': http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=69146

FREDDY
10-02-2005, 06:45 PM
haha naw not pro thats impossible ive been playing for just a year im just wondering

FREDDY
10-02-2005, 06:46 PM
thanks for the input though and btw i turn 16 in april 2006 so im 16 lol

nswelshman
10-03-2005, 01:40 AM
Which ATP top 70 player has this biography?

PERSONAL
Began playing tennis at age six with his parents...Has one younger sister...Hobbies include hunting and golf...Played soccer most of his childhood but began to take tennis seriously at 17...

Make what you want out of it...

Mr.Groundstroke
10-03-2005, 08:30 AM
Hewitt started late too...
So think off that ;)
If you want to become a pro you need to have people who can lift you to another level, then (if you're lucky) you'll be spotted and you will get professional training. :p

nickybol
10-03-2005, 09:23 AM
16 is far too late, 11 or 12 can sometimes be possible but 16 is too late. Definitely. No one will argue that.

AMD64
10-04-2005, 08:04 AM
dont give up... anything is possible. Just harder. If you train all day everyday some miracle might happen

nViATi
10-04-2005, 02:28 PM
dont give up... anything is possible. Just harder. If you train all day everyday some miracle might happen
or you could just waste your life.
Remember, school is the most important thing. Play tennis to have fun but don't devote your life to the nearly impossible goal of being a pro.

ExHiLaToR
10-04-2005, 02:34 PM
You could always strive for the high school tennis team, which will hopefully, lead you to a spot on a NCAA college team.

Mr.Federer
10-04-2005, 03:07 PM
Ginepri started at twelve.

nickybol
10-05-2005, 11:43 AM
or you could just waste your life.
Remember, school is the most important thing. Play tennis to have fun but don't devote your life to the nearly impossible goal of being a pro.
This guy is right.

akj27
10-05-2005, 12:01 PM
federer started at 16, and nadal at 17

dozu
10-05-2005, 12:48 PM
people watch TV and see the glory of the top players and want to be pros, and they are blind to the odds of success:

right now, the #100 ranked male player earns $100k/year, which is only mediocre in the corporate world. let's put the money part aside, and assuming that reaching top 100 is you ultimate goal, and think about this: this is more difficult than:

1. becoming the head of a small nation (there are 200+ countries in the world)

2. becoming a US senate.. because only the US talents are competing for the senate seats, and the tennis ranking is a world wide thing

3. becoming the CEO of a Fortune500 company... because there are 500 CEOs !!

Now you have a sense how high a mountain you need to climb? yes, miracle happens, but more likely than not, miracle does NOT happen.

And achievement wise, financially or career, achieving any of the above 3 goals is far more rewarding than becoming a top 100 tennis player.

Burt Turkoglu
10-06-2005, 12:31 AM
federer started at 16, and nadal at 17
.....you gotta be kidding me....lol....Nadal isn't much more than 17 now.....

nswelshman
10-06-2005, 03:42 AM
people watch TV and see the glory of the top players and want to be pros, and they are blind to the odds of success:

right now, the #100 ranked male player earns $100k/year, which is only mediocre in the corporate world. let's put the money part aside, and assuming that reaching top 100 is you ultimate goal, and think about this: this is more difficult than:

1. becoming the head of a small nation (there are 200+ countries in the world)

2. becoming a US senate.. because only the US talents are competing for the senate seats, and the tennis ranking is a world wide thing

3. becoming the CEO of a Fortune500 company... because there are 500 CEOs !!

Now you have a sense how high a mountain you need to climb? yes, miracle happens, but more likely than not, miracle does NOT happen.

And achievement wise, financially or career, achieving any of the above 3 goals is far more rewarding than becoming a top 100 tennis player.


I'm all for encouraging further education, but c'mon, these stats don't represent actual odds of attaining them....

There are 1340 ATP professionals vying for top 100 spots. That is 100/1340 odds.

So there are 500 fortune five hundred companies with one CEO. How many CEOs are there in the world? Thats 500/XXXXXX odds.

200 countries in the world- how many people in each country are in position to attain leadership? You probably have several major parties, each with their own team of people competing within the party for higher positions, and also several smaller parties each attempting to gain power.


Basically all i'm saying is that if you want to be the top of your field- an ATP top player, A F500 CEO, a leader of a small nation, you have got to be pretty darn special, have a killer work ethic, go after your goals- lots of strong qualities. You don't just go through the motions to get any of these positions. Odds of having a typically 'comfortable' life are higher by going to College, but the odds certainly are not better becoming one of the above examples over an ATP top 100 player.

nickybol
10-06-2005, 05:41 AM
akj24, you`re joking

nswelshman
10-06-2005, 04:03 PM
16 is far too late, 11 or 12 can sometimes be possible but 16 is too late. Definitely. No one will argue that.

No one will argue that? I will... ;) There are players who have started focusing on tennis after 16 to become top 100 professionals. Arthurs. Saulnier. I would not argue though that they are a rare breed, and are not considered the norm.

FMartin
10-06-2005, 04:33 PM
federer started at 16, and nadal at 17
I think thats when they turned pro, not when they started playing.

nickybol
10-07-2005, 05:05 AM
No one will argue that? I will... ;) There are players who have started focusing on tennis after 16 to become top 100 professionals. Arthurs. Saulnier. I would not argue though that they are a rare breed, and are not considered the norm.
We`re talking about modern tennis.... you must not look at the current pro players but at the pro players of tomorrow.

It`s very important to have excellent coordination and feeling for the ball. If you developed that in another sport you can still be pro if you are 11 or 12. If you didn`t, forget it.

Grigollif1
10-07-2005, 08:58 AM
federer started at 16, and nadal at 17


hehehe! good joke there... Or at least I hope It was beacuse Nadal started at 2 and federer at 4.