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MegacedU
10-03-2005, 07:42 AM
On the approach, instead of hitting deep to the corners, I tend to hit, or attempt to hit, a heavy top spin shot at a sharp angle so I can take the easy volley. This, when properly executed, is highly effective. However, I tend to run through the approach instead of taking the necessary split step, and ultimately I hit 90% of those easy approaches into the net. Any thoughts on how to stop all this?

Rickson
10-03-2005, 08:09 AM
On the approach, instead of hitting deep to the corners, I tend to hit, or attempt to hit, a heavy top spin shot at a sharp angle so I can take the easy volley. This, when properly executed, is highly effective. However, I tend to run through the approach instead of taking the necessary split step, and ultimately I hit 90% of those easy approaches into the net. Any thoughts on how to stop all this?
Why not hit deep to the baseline instead? The longer the distance the returner has to cover, the better chance of getting the volley.

Ash Doyle
10-03-2005, 08:59 AM
Also, I would think a sharp angle would open up a large opening, should the opponent reach the ball, to pass you. This is why an approach shot down the line gives you the best opportunity to cover the reply.

Marius_Hancu
10-03-2005, 09:08 AM
try some slice for variety DTL
highly effective

JeffH1
10-03-2005, 09:18 AM
Then just have someone feed you balls, so you can practice the footwork/timing. I suspect that you are prob a little anxious also, and take you eyes off the ball just before you hit. This will cause you to loose track of the ball and run through it to much (jamming). You should still be hitting the ball well in front of you.

Ash Doyle
10-03-2005, 09:23 AM
To answer your issue about the footwork (the whole point of the thread), I'd say you see the opportunity and then you are rushing. Like JeffH1 says, practicing the shot while focusing on footwork may be a solution...and then don't forget to take your time in the match.

Return_Ace
10-03-2005, 10:31 AM
On the approach, instead of hitting deep to the corners, I tend to hit, or attempt to hit, a heavy top spin shot at a sharp angle so I can take the easy volley. This, when properly executed, is highly effective. However, I tend to run through the approach instead of taking the necessary split step, and ultimately I hit 90% of those easy approaches into the net. Any thoughts on how to stop all this?

as someone else has said, doesn't your out wide shot leave more room for a down the line passing shot? or a shot to curl round/behind you? personally, i would go "deep and down the middle leaning towards the bh side" (which gives less angle for the passer........), "inside out to the corner" (i just love this shot, seems to do pretty good too) or "the other corner" (it goes to their bh)

and in true return_ace patronisin

However, I tend to run through the approach instead of taking the necessary split step

mebbe learn to actually TAKE the splitstep? lol <3zor

-------------------

Also megs, are you using a closed stance for your topspin approach shots? i only realised the usefulness of this when i got back from holidays and playing in a tourney, i kinda lost my open stnace fh so i had to rely on my bh and closed stance topspin fh approach shot to hop it to the net ^^.

MegacedU
10-03-2005, 03:57 PM
Sigh, it's tough though. doing that when i've been doing it wrong for so long ace. :(

I actually employed some of of everyone's tips in my match today and I was victorious after a grueling 3 setter. So in that case, thanks guys.

andreh
10-03-2005, 11:34 PM
(If I don't slice), I occasionally hit a high loopy forehand (almost a lob) with a lot of topspin to the baseline on my opponents backhand side and approach behind it. The advantages of this shot is:

1) It's a slow shot. It gives you time to get close to the net.
2) It will bounce high to the opponents backhand which will make it hard for him to pass me. Very effective against a one-handed backhand.
3) surprise. Generally people don't expect an approach behind a shot like that.

Disadvantages:

1) It's a slow shot. Gives the opponent time to set up a passingshot or a lob.
2) People who can step in and take the ball early before it bounces up will negate the effect of this shot. Don't use it against them.

Return_Ace
10-05-2005, 08:17 AM
no offence andreh, i see where your coming from but, high shot = easier for opponent to hit it low. and slicing the ball low is what most people would do. personally i hate volleying sliced shots.

andreh
10-05-2005, 11:21 PM
no offence andreh, i see where your coming from but, high shot = easier for opponent to hit it low. and slicing the ball low is what most people would do. personally i hate volleying sliced shots.

Yeah, probably doesn't work at high level tennis. I'd like to stress that I only use it occasionally as a surprise attack. People don't expect an attack behind such a ball. Normally I approach with a low backhand slice.

Burt Turkoglu
10-06-2005, 12:07 AM
.....I'd stay back on that shot dude.....especially if you can hit it more consistently by staying back instead of running thru it......BUT move a little inside the baseline bisecting the angle of possible returns.....if he floats it back, move in quickly and volley it into the opening as he'll be waaaaay off the court still......if he goes up the line, move quickly and take it on the rise crosscourt if you can....if he angles it crosscourt, move forward quickly, take it up the line and come in on that......saaaavy? It's all geometry son.....

Marius_Hancu
11-03-2005, 07:56 AM
you might want to have a look at this one:

Edberg's slice approach (clip):
(link courtesy of AndrewD)
http://edberg.free.fr/videos/edberg_rosset_rg96/edberg_33_montee_appuis.mpg

Here's the whole site:
http://edberg.free.fr/videos_index.htm
I put parts of the links in the Sticky.

MegacedU
11-03-2005, 01:23 PM
Thanks, guys, for the feedback.

DX_Psycho
11-03-2005, 01:29 PM
out is better than into the net.

FiveO
11-03-2005, 01:54 PM
I'm beginning to think that some people here do not know what an approach shot is.

I agree. Recognizing the difference between being in position for a put-away, an offensive approach or if you've been forced forward in a less than offensive position is a huge part of all-court tennis.

While a put-away may end up being "an approach" or an offensive approach may end up a winner, an offensive approach is predicated on the very good possibility that you will have to hit a follow-up volley (or two) an overhead or both. The idea is to keep the ball out of the opponent's strike zone by forcing them to them to reach and/or to hit from well below net height. At lower levels looping approaches can work the same way because you're forcing the opponent to make contact out of their strike zone. But notice, even then, you are conceding your opponent will be able to hit the ball. At lower levels it is easier to pick on the glaringly weaker side of the opponent throwing every approach whether dtl or x-court to that side. Go x-court and you must realize you will have to cover much more ground in order to get to the center of the opponent's possible returns.

As you move up in level keeping the ball low becomes the primary focus of a good approach because you force the opponent to hit up from below net height creating a better chance that your follow up volley will be hit from above net height offensively, an easier volley. Recognition is huge.

What are your opponent's strengths/weaknesses, grips, style of hitting, conditioning, stage of the match, etc.?.

What’s the surface you are playing on, (Slippery surfaces generally make hitting behind the opponent a more viable option) is important.

Recognition of approach opportunities is the first part.
Several things have to be satisfied in order to have an approach opportunity.
1) generally a shorter ball that you can set-up or move forward thru
2) contact at or above net height
3) a ball off which you can force the opponent to make contact well below net height which is why slice IS the prefered shot selection
4) ideally but not necessarily a ball with which you can satisfy the above and make the opponent move, thus preventing him from setting up, and force him to make contact outside the sideline.

Recognizing your options off that ball is the second.
1) where is the ball in relation to the opponent? In other words did the short ball come with your opponent stuck in one corner or the other.
2) where will you make contact on your side of the net laterally? Center? 3 feet inside the sideline? Outside the sideline? Which side (fh or bh) will or can you hit the shot with? Very, very important. Your lateral court position is enormously significant as to what the percentage play is.

Once you have the opportunity, the percentage approach IS dtl deep and out of the opponent's strike zone. Flat, slice and or sidespin are the best choices. If you have a put-away, and have decided to follow it in, put the ball away. Your first choice is to put the ball away dtl. Only go x-court IF you are absolutely, positively sure you are able to end the point outright. Otherwise, again, you are leaving the entire court exposed. A put-away may end up being an approach but it is not the intent. A put-away is hit hard without consideration of where you will be as the opponent may make contact. It is also hit w/o regard of how high your ball will bounce in relation to the opponent's strike zone. So if you confuse an approach opportunity with a put-away opportunity you can get passed very quickly if your opponent covers the "put-away".

If you are "approaching" off a short ball anywhere from the center to 3 feet inside the sideline, the percentage play IS dtl with slice. Yes, knifing slice. Remember the approach parameters include making contact at or above net height. The deeper toward the baseline you hit the slice the "safer" the shot is in terms of net clearance. Knifing slice will keep the ball well down below net height forcing your opponent to hit up to clear the net. Hitting dtl also keeps the ball in front of the approacher meaning he does not have to cover as much ground to reach the center of the opponent's possible returns. Hitting dtl off anything from the center to 3 feet inside the sideline are basically hit inside out, also taking the opponent outside the sideline. By definition the approach is forcing the opponent behind the baseline, outside the sideline, hitting the ball well below his prefered strike zone and putting the net in his way. You've also created a situation where you don't have to move far to reach the center of your opponent's possible returns and created the probability that his return will reach you above net height with the entire court open. Will there be situational exceptions? Sure. Can you hit change ups? Yep. But this is the percentage play.

A shorter ball at or outside your sideline presents other dilemnas and choices. Hit from outside the sideline a dtl is actually angling toward the center of the opponent's court. It likely came off a x-court ball which means the opponent is in the x-court corner. Depending on the opponent's positioning a shorter low x-court slice/chip may work. For many it is more likely the time to stay in the rally and wait out another short ball.

If you are jerked forward by a short ball or dropshot, unless you can make contact at or above net height you are likely defensive, depth is still your friend, a return drop-shot is the second option but realize because you have been forced to reach and hit up you are now likely to lose the point vs. a good player. This is not the approach opportunity you are looking for.

Bungalo Bill
11-03-2005, 04:03 PM
I agree. Recognizing the difference between being in position for a put-away, an offensive approach or if you've been forced forward in a less than offensive position is a huge part of all-court tennis.

While a put-away may end up being "an approach" or an offensive approach may end up a winner, an offensive approach is predicated on the very good possibility that you will have to hit a follow-up volley (or two) an overhead or both. The idea is to keep the ball out of the opponent's strike zone by forcing them to them to reach and/or to hit from well below net height. At lower levels looping approaches can work the same way because you're forcing the opponent to make contact out of their strike zone. But notice, even then, you are conceding your opponent will be able to hit the ball. At lower levels it is easier to pick on the glaringly weaker side of the opponent throwing every approach whether dtl or x-court to that side. Go x-court and you must realize you will have to cover much more ground in order to get to the center of the opponent's possible returns.

As you move up in level keeping the ball low becomes the primary focus of a good approach because you force the opponent to hit up from below net height creating a better chance that your follow up volley will be hit from above net height offensively, an easier volley. Recognition is huge.

What are your opponent's strengths/weaknesses, grips, style of hitting, conditioning, stage of the match, etc.?.

What’s the surface you are playing on, (Slippery surfaces generally make hitting behind the opponent a more viable option) is important.

Recognition of approach opportunities is the first part.
Several things have to be satisfied in order to have an approach opportunity.
1) generally a shorter ball that you can set-up or move forward thru
2) contact at or above net height
3) a ball off which you can force the opponent to make contact well below net height which is why slice IS the prefered shot selection
4) ideally but not necessarily a ball with which you can satisfy the above and make the opponent move, thus preventing him from setting up, and force him to make contact outside the sideline.

Recognizing your options off that ball is the second.
1) where is the ball in relation to the opponent? In other words did the short ball come with your opponent stuck in one corner or the other.
2) where will you make contact on your side of the net laterally? Center? 3 feet inside the sideline? Outside the sideline? Which side (fh or bh) will or can you hit the shot with? Very, very important. Your lateral court position is enormously significant as to what the percentage play is.

Once you have the opportunity, the percentage approach IS dtl deep and out of the opponent's strike zone. Flat, slice and or sidespin are the best choices. If you have a put-away, and have decided to follow it in, put the ball away. Your first choice is to put the ball away dtl. Only go x-court IF you are absolutely, positively sure you are able to end the point outright. Otherwise, again, you are leaving the entire court exposed. A put-away may end up being an approach but it is not the intent. A put-away is hit hard without consideration of where you will be as the opponent may make contact. It is also hit w/o regard of how high your ball will bounce in relation to the opponent's strike zone. So if you confuse an approach opportunity with a put-away opportunity you can get passed very quickly if your opponent covers the "put-away".

If you are "approaching" off a short ball anywhere from the center to 3 feet inside the sideline, the percentage play IS dtl with slice. Yes, knifing slice. Remember the approach parameters include making contact at or above net height. The deeper toward the baseline you hit the slice the "safer" the shot is in terms of net clearance. Knifing slice will keep the ball well down below net height forcing your opponent to hit up to clear the net. Hitting dtl also keeps the ball in front of the approacher meaning he does not have to cover as much ground to reach the center of the opponent's possible returns. Hitting dtl off anything from the center to 3 feet inside the sideline are basically hit inside out, also taking the opponent outside the sideline. By definition the approach is forcing the opponent behind the baseline, outside the sideline, hitting the ball well below his prefered strike zone and putting the net in his way. You've also created a situation where you don't have to move far to reach the center of your opponent's possible returns and created the probability that his return will reach you above net height with the entire court open. Will there be situational exceptions? Sure. Can you hit change ups? Yep. But this is the percentage play.

A shorter ball at or outside your sideline presents other dilemnas and choices. Hit from outside the sideline a dtl is actually angling toward the center of the opponent's court. It likely came off a x-court ball which means the opponent is in the x-court corner. Depending on the opponent's positioning a shorter low x-court slice/chip may work. For many it is more likely the time to stay in the rally and wait out another short ball.

If you are jerked forward by a short ball or dropshot, unless you can make contact at or above net height you are likely defensive, depth is still your friend, a return drop-shot is the second option but realize because you have been forced to reach and hit up you are now likely to lose the point vs. a good player. This is not the approach opportunity you are looking for.

Wow, FiveO excellent advice. Very well said.

Wanted to let you know that tennisplayer.net has a free forum as well. Would love to see you poke your head inside to see what is up. Your advice is great and it would be great to have your perspective on things occasionally.

Bungalo Bill
11-03-2005, 04:04 PM
I agree. Recognizing the difference between being in position for a put-away, an offensive approach or if you've been forced forward in a less than offensive position is a huge part of all-court tennis.

While a put-away may end up being "an approach" or an offensive approach may end up a winner, an offensive approach is predicated on the very good possibility that you will have to hit a follow-up volley (or two) an overhead or both. The idea is to keep the ball out of the opponent's strike zone by forcing them to them to reach and/or to hit from well below net height. At lower levels looping approaches can work the same way because you're forcing the opponent to make contact out of their strike zone. But notice, even then, you are conceding your opponent will be able to hit the ball. At lower levels it is easier to pick on the glaringly weaker side of the opponent throwing every approach whether dtl or x-court to that side. Go x-court and you must realize you will have to cover much more ground in order to get to the center of the opponent's possible returns.

As you move up in level keeping the ball low becomes the primary focus of a good approach because you force the opponent to hit up from below net height creating a better chance that your follow up volley will be hit from above net height offensively, an easier volley. Recognition is huge.

What are your opponent's strengths/weaknesses, grips, style of hitting, conditioning, stage of the match, etc.?.

What’s the surface you are playing on, (Slippery surfaces generally make hitting behind the opponent a more viable option) is important.

Recognition of approach opportunities is the first part.
Several things have to be satisfied in order to have an approach opportunity.
1) generally a shorter ball that you can set-up or move forward thru
2) contact at or above net height
3) a ball off which you can force the opponent to make contact well below net height which is why slice IS the prefered shot selection
4) ideally but not necessarily a ball with which you can satisfy the above and make the opponent move, thus preventing him from setting up, and force him to make contact outside the sideline.

Recognizing your options off that ball is the second.
1) where is the ball in relation to the opponent? In other words did the short ball come with your opponent stuck in one corner or the other.
2) where will you make contact on your side of the net laterally? Center? 3 feet inside the sideline? Outside the sideline? Which side (fh or bh) will or can you hit the shot with? Very, very important. Your lateral court position is enormously significant as to what the percentage play is.

Once you have the opportunity, the percentage approach IS dtl deep and out of the opponent's strike zone. Flat, slice and or sidespin are the best choices. If you have a put-away, and have decided to follow it in, put the ball away. Your first choice is to put the ball away dtl. Only go x-court IF you are absolutely, positively sure you are able to end the point outright. Otherwise, again, you are leaving the entire court exposed. A put-away may end up being an approach but it is not the intent. A put-away is hit hard without consideration of where you will be as the opponent may make contact. It is also hit w/o regard of how high your ball will bounce in relation to the opponent's strike zone. So if you confuse an approach opportunity with a put-away opportunity you can get passed very quickly if your opponent covers the "put-away".

If you are "approaching" off a short ball anywhere from the center to 3 feet inside the sideline, the percentage play IS dtl with slice. Yes, knifing slice. Remember the approach parameters include making contact at or above net height. The deeper toward the baseline you hit the slice the "safer" the shot is in terms of net clearance. Knifing slice will keep the ball well down below net height forcing your opponent to hit up to clear the net. Hitting dtl also keeps the ball in front of the approacher meaning he does not have to cover as much ground to reach the center of the opponent's possible returns. Hitting dtl off anything from the center to 3 feet inside the sideline are basically hit inside out, also taking the opponent outside the sideline. By definition the approach is forcing the opponent behind the baseline, outside the sideline, hitting the ball well below his prefered strike zone and putting the net in his way. You've also created a situation where you don't have to move far to reach the center of your opponent's possible returns and created the probability that his return will reach you above net height with the entire court open. Will there be situational exceptions? Sure. Can you hit change ups? Yep. But this is the percentage play.

A shorter ball at or outside your sideline presents other dilemnas and choices. Hit from outside the sideline a dtl is actually angling toward the center of the opponent's court. It likely came off a x-court ball which means the opponent is in the x-court corner. Depending on the opponent's positioning a shorter low x-court slice/chip may work. For many it is more likely the time to stay in the rally and wait out another short ball.

If you are jerked forward by a short ball or dropshot, unless you can make contact at or above net height you are likely defensive, depth is still your friend, a return drop-shot is the second option but realize because you have been forced to reach and hit up you are now likely to lose the point vs. a good player. This is not the approach opportunity you are looking for.

Wow, FiveO excellent advice. Very well said.

Wanted to let you know that tennisplayer.net has a free forum as well. Would love to see you poke your head inside to see what is up. Your advice is great and it would be great to have your perspective on things.

Tennis Ball Hitter
11-04-2005, 05:27 AM
I employ andreh strategy on the majority of my apporach shots. that is,
a moonball with alot more kick than normal deep down the center or deep to the BH side. I find that opponents find it harder to lob these shots than the slice dtl.

With the approach down the middle, you have to be awake becuase more often than not the shot is fired straight back down the middle.

However, I don't come in very often, my volley'ing is a surprise attack.

My biggest problem is I tend to rush in too fast and don't seem to know when to start slowing down.

celo007
11-04-2005, 09:03 AM
Well i mean dude, tennis isnt for everyone, i think you shuold switch sports and join darts.

cadfael_tex
11-04-2005, 09:34 AM
As you pointed out in your own post, footwork is the key. Don't run through the ball. Don't rush in rushing the net. I have two modes of thoughts on approachs. Hard away because the ball that may be a winner also make a good approach shot. The other is slice at the body. I have never like angles on approachs because it gives the opponent angles as well. Into the body often results in a floater that is easy to put away to either side. My 2p.

ZhangM58
11-04-2005, 10:47 AM
Meg, are you getting up to the ball fast enough? If you are letting the ball drop too low, the only way you can get it over the net is to apply heavy spin. If you do get to the ball quickly enough to get set for the ball, you can drive it and hit through it a bit more, and even hitting down a bit, because you are taking the ball at its highest point.

Mahboob Khan
11-05-2005, 12:24 AM
Transition from baseline to the net is achieved via approach shots. These could be:

-- through rip and charge

-- chip and charge

-- Serve (and volley),

-- You can use your drop shot as an approach shot

-- You can use your first volley as an approach shot (if you cannot finish the point right-away);

However, the best "approach shot" is a backhand slice hit deep down the line; it ought to be deep, low and slow enabling you the time to approach the net.

The sharp angled cross court ground strokes are great to open up the court for your eventual down the line slice approach shot; great to hit winners here and there; but they should not be used as an approach shots because this will afford a passing shot angle to your opponent.

You ought to work at your slice BH approach down the line!

joe1987
11-05-2005, 03:20 AM
I think another key to the approach is to disguse where you are going to hit the ball. If its too obvious then the opponent will be there prepared to hit passing shot( if your at the net) either that or you'll be stuck in no mans land and be force to play a pick up volley
(if not done properly, you just gave your opponent a sitter). One other thing I've done before is hit a very spinny forehand to the corner(make sure the ball will kick high). I just took some pace off it and went for percentage9hence the spin). Try and give the ball some side spin as well then it'll curl out wide making your opponent run for it and opening up the court for you but make sure your shot has either angle or depth.

This is another suggestion, give your opponent the impression of a big approach shot then change your grip halfway and hit a drop shot. (nothing to do with this thread but will help win you the point if you can make it)

Marius_Hancu
11-05-2005, 04:25 AM
joe1987,

this thread was already in the Sticky:-)
check my
Attacking the Short Ball
posting there