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Assassin
10-07-2005, 06:42 AM
After constant practice on my technical game, I feel that all left is to concentrate on mental strength, consistency, and add minor parts as coaches see fit.

I have a *big* game playing 4.5 aggressive all-courter, and sometimes I find myself going for too much. I get the feeling that the ball is going in slow motion and I take too much of a crack at it, especially evident on short balls. This usually results in a string of errors and I tend to get irate and frustrated at myself. I also start to play tighter after this. Is there anyway that you could recommend to calm myself down and convince myself that I don't have to go for so much? I have read mental game books such as 'the inner game of tennis', but that book seemed to bore me after a while. Do you think getting the book 'winning ugly' would be more beneficial?

thanx,
Anthony

Marius_Hancu
10-07-2005, 06:50 AM
winning ugly
would be recommended
also some of the Loehr books
or some chapters in the Serious Tennis

but for now, search for "mental" in here, there are several good threads already (over 2 pages of threads)

Marius_Hancu
10-07-2005, 06:55 AM
also, you might have to consider closing more the face of your racket, esp on some short balls:

How do they hit their forehand with a so close racquet face? (see pic inside)
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=44538

Assassin
10-07-2005, 07:20 AM
Thanks for the help so far, Marius, but would you have any advice on how to combat moonballs? Some days when I get fed these, I have a field day, other days I find myself getting so tight.

Marius_Hancu
10-07-2005, 07:51 AM
help with moonballs
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=42470

Geezer Guy
10-07-2005, 07:57 AM
"...usually results in a string of errors..." Often, when we make an unforced error, the very next ball our opponent sends us will be just like the last one. Our opponent has seen a potential weakness, and wants to capitalize. Thing is, when you make an error, you need to concentrate on NOT making the SAME error twice in a row. Make a backhand error? You can bet you'll be seeing another backhand in the next rally. Make your next backhand a little more conservative - be sure it goes in. After you make an error, make extra sure you don't make that same error again.

..."any advice on how to combat moonballs?"... You're in luck! As a "4.5 aggressive all-courter" you should have no problems hitting hard forcing shots to the corners and following those shots into the net. You'll be able to pluck off those moonball replies like sitters with easy volleys or overheads. Just don't overcommit to the net too much on your approach. Just go to about the service line until you see how high & deep the moonball will be. From the service line, you can either advance or retreat as necessary.

Assassin
10-07-2005, 08:15 AM
..."any advice on how to combat moonballs?"... You're in luck! As a "4.5 aggressive all-courter" you should have no problems hitting hard forcing shots to the corners and following those shots into the net. You'll be able to pluck off those moonball replies like sitters with easy volleys or overheads. Just don't overcommit to the net too much on your approach. Just go to about the service line until you see how high & deep the moonball will be. From the service line, you can either advance or retreat as necessary.

The moonballs that have recently given me trouble are balls sent to my forehand curving away, they should be easy picking, but recently I've found myself either going for too much or not going for enough. I tend to dwell on a UE and then I get tighter and tighter.

I understand the other concept with the UE's, I just need a refresher lesson which you gave me, Geezer Guy.

The main problem I can identify now is that I have trouble keeping a good thing going, inconsistency I fear will really hurt me.

Thanx for all the help....

Matthew
10-07-2005, 08:27 AM
If someone is moonballing you, just do the same thing back. Hit with a good amount of topspin, place the ball deep, go for the backhand, and hit with margin. Eventually your opponent will hit a ball short enough that is attackable - and then rip it!

Geezer Guy
10-07-2005, 12:53 PM
... The main problem I can identify now is that I have trouble keeping a good thing going, inconsistency I fear will really hurt me. ...

For what it's worth - and you'll get different opinions on this, but it's what works for me - when I'm playing consistently well, I DON'T think about technique at all. However, when I have a few errors I DO think about technique, and what I need to do to prevent the errors from recurring. Something simple and easy, like moving my feet, keeping my eye on the ball, hitting with a bit more topspin, etc. That's usually enough for me to start getting the ball in the court again. Then, I quit thinking about it.

Assassin
10-07-2005, 05:05 PM
winning ugly
would be recommended
also some of the Loehr books
or some chapters in the Serious Tennis

but for now, search for "mental" in here, there are several good threads already (over 2 pages of threads)

Winning Ugly was the only book I could find at a local bookstore today, but it was my first priority anyways. If those other books would really be beneficial, I'll check my local library. Thanx for the recommendations, Marius. I'll post feedback on how they helped my game.

GrahamIsSuper
10-07-2005, 06:23 PM
winning ugly
would be recommended
also some of the Loehr books
or some chapters in the Serious Tennis

but for now, search for "mental" in here, there are several good threads already (over 2 pages of threads)

Loehr also makes tapes, they are a bit expensive but are very effective if you don't know how to read. "The 16 second cure" is very good, I own it (however, I can read) and I can say from personal experience that it helps a lot. Loehr is very good at what he does.

Burt Turkoglu
10-07-2005, 07:40 PM
.....if you can afford it.....get a coach....if you can't, why not videotape your matches...there is a device that can hook up your cam to the top of the back fence...it get's the whole court.....anyway, you can learn alot from your matches......

Galactus
10-08-2005, 03:09 AM
After constant practice on my technical game, I feel that all left is to concentrate on mental strength, consistency, and add minor parts as coaches see fit.

I have a *big* game playing 4.5 aggressive all-courter, and sometimes I find myself going for too much. I get the feeling that the ball is going in slow motion and I take too much of a crack at it, especially evident on short balls. This usually results in a string of errors and I tend to get irate and frustrated at myself. I also start to play tighter after this. Is there anyway that you could recommend to calm myself down and convince myself that I don't have to go for so much? I have read mental game books such as 'the inner game of tennis', but that book seemed to bore me after a while. Do you think getting the book 'winning ugly' would be more beneficial?

thanx,
Anthony
Assassin - you sound exactly like me!!
I feel I'm a 3.5 aand getting better each week but the mental-side of my game is more like a 0.5 somedays!
Especially on serve, short balls and moonballs: I am unable to hit a 2nd serve so end up going for two 1st serves which results in 10-20 double-faults each match; short balls I overhit; moonballs - forget it!!

Just try and play each point as a tie-breaker -that's my theory...

GregOz
10-08-2005, 03:30 AM
What I would advise is that you take a leaf out of Rod Laver's book. When he was feeling tension he'd hit the ball harder. The key is, he'd add more topspin for control.

Really let a few shots rip with some heavy top and you'll find it's an excellent way to ward off the nerves. You'll also find that, deciding to do it in advance, improves the shot immensely. Instead of merely reacting to whatever comes over the net you've got a plan.

If you get those short balls by all means, hit them as hard as you like. However, don't hit them as flat as you can. If you're going to crunch them, make sure you've got enough top on to keep them down.

Don't overcomplicate things. If the ball's deep, add some height (top). If it's around the service line, approach. If it's inside the service box, flatten out your shot. Knowing exactly what you need to do on each shot will help you stay calm and cut down on the loose errors.