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hlkimfung
10-09-2005, 07:39 PM
I used to workout in the gym as running on the runner until my knee got hurt due to tennis. Then I switch to the sking machine (don't know the term, the treadmill without the handheld stick) and my knee feel a lot better

However, I feel like going to hell after 30 min on the thing. I wonder if it can build up the stamina better

For swimming, it's alot easier for me where I can swimming for 90 min non stop and didn't feel too exhausted when finished

Does the gym work and swimming serve the same purpose for better stamina? Or swimming won't work unless I feel like dying out there?

which is a more important element? Intensity or duration?

Rickson
10-09-2005, 07:58 PM
I used to workout in the gym as running on the runner until my knee got hurt due to tennis. Then I switch to the sking machine (don't know the term, the treadmill without the handheld stick) and my knee feel a lot better

However, I feel like going to hell after 30 min on the thing. I wonder if it can build up the stamina better

For swimming, it's alot easier for me where I can swimming for 90 min non stop and didn't feel too exhausted when finished

Does the gym work and swimming serve the same purpose for better stamina? Or swimming won't work unless I feel like dying out there?

which is a more important element? Intensity or duration?
Swimming won't do jack for tennis. You want to get better at tennis, play tennis. You want to be a better swimmer, go swim.

nViATi
10-09-2005, 08:09 PM
Swimming won't do jack for tennis. You want to get better at tennis, play tennis. You want to be a better swimmer, go swim.
it will help him get stronger and have better stamina. being stronger and having better stamina will definitely help his tennis

Mahboob Khan
10-09-2005, 08:12 PM
Swimming is poison for tennis:

-- In tennis you need quick reflexes, swimming gives you slow reflexes

-- Bulk swimming muscles around shoulder joints inhibit tennis swing particularly forehand, and serve.

I do not recommend swimming for tennis. In Tennis Academies they do swimming, that's to kill time in other activities. How otherwise you spend 6 hours a day?

nViATi
10-09-2005, 08:48 PM
Swimming is poison for tennis:

-- In tennis you need quick reflexes, swimming gives you slow reflexes

-- Bulk swimming muscles around shoulder joints inhibit tennis swing particularly forehand, and serve.

I do not recommend swimming for tennis. In Tennis Academies they do swimming, that's to kill time in other activities. How otherwise you spend 6 hours a day?
wow really? never knew that. thanks for the info.

bobby
10-09-2005, 09:37 PM
Swimming isn't really great for tennis, but only because you have the option of performing activities much more beneficial to developing your tennis game. Basketball, for example, develops your footwork, your hand-eye coordination, your explosive movement, etc. and so it is greatly beneficial to your tennis game. Swimming does none of these things. However, it will increase your endurance and your lung capacity. Also, it is a great way to burn calories, so it could help you to maintain a body weight appropiate to being sucessful at tennis.

So, while swimming is not very tennis skill specific, it will help your game by increasing your overall endurance, which will translate to your ability to last longer on the court. It is certainly not, as Mahboob Khan asserts, "poison for tennis." Swimming in and of itself will not give you slow reflexes, nor will it give you the kind of muscle growth that will impede your ability to hit a forehand or serve. If anything, any muscle growth from swimming will help prevent injuries rather than hurt your stroke.

Swimming is certainly better for your tennis game than sitting on a couch and watching TV. It will not "poison" your tennis game. It will help it. Just not nearly, nearly as much as other cross-training activities.

Closesc
10-10-2005, 06:14 AM
I believe swimming is wonderfull for tennis. I have a bum knee and running has too much impact on the joint for me. I have been swimming 4-5 times a week during my lunch hour for the last two years. I usually warm up with a 1000 yards of freestyle and breast stroke then 20 minutes of sprints freestyle, backstroke. Then spend 10 minutes on lower body with a kick board or fins. Swimming has benefited my endurance, strength, bmi, flexiblility and quickness. Swimming does not build bulky muscles like intensive heavy weight training, it is like working out with lower weight and more reps. Tennis requires short burst of speed using all of your body, legs, abs, back and arms. Swimming sprints works all of these areas at the same time. All areas of my game have improved, plus I feel better the next day or that night after a hard match. Both my doubles partner and myself swim and it seems to help our games.

NoBadMojo
10-10-2005, 06:32 AM
i think swimmng can be beneficial for tennis for some of the reasons listed above, but also that strength you develop in your core and shoulders and such steds you well for tennis....for example it can gve you more work on your serve because you are stronger all around, but particularly in the shoulders..it may also help prevent rotator cuff probs and such. the only time i feel swimming would be bad for you for tennis if say your only two activities were tennis and swimming and you swam say 5 tmes a week and played tennis only once or something like that. i think all sports and activities help your tennis and i encourage young people to play alot of dferent sports because they all help your tennis. as for me, i have a touring kayak and am in that as much as possible.it really strenghthens your core for tennis and shoulders and i have found i get alot more jump and work on my serve with the aditional strength i've developed by kayaking..the same may be true for swimming

Bungalo Bill
10-10-2005, 06:33 AM
I used to workout in the gym as running on the runner until my knee got hurt due to tennis. Then I switch to the sking machine (don't know the term, the treadmill without the handheld stick) and my knee feel a lot better

However, I feel like going to hell after 30 min on the thing. I wonder if it can build up the stamina better

For swimming, it's alot easier for me where I can swimming for 90 min non stop and didn't feel too exhausted when finished

Does the gym work and swimming serve the same purpose for better stamina? Or swimming won't work unless I feel like dying out there?

which is a more important element? Intensity or duration?

I am coming at this from my participation on a Master Swim team several years back (B.K, Before Kids).

Swimming is one of the best exercises in the world. It is good for tennis from a workout perspective and its ability to massage the muscles as you move through the water. Patrick Rafter was known to go for swim as part of his workout regime and his rehabilitation of his shoulder.

Things to be careful about:

1. Dont overload the shoulders: I would suggest you use swimming paddles sparingly. There is enough stress in the shoulder area in tennis. Using paddles too quickly or too long can lead to injuries you dont want to go through. So if you use paddles, be smart. Start out with the small ones and maybe remain there.

2. Although you gain in aerobics, it is not the same. You will get in shape and swimming is good for the lungs, but it is of a different timing. You only need to participate in a Triathlon to discover how the body needs to switch to a different breathing pattern going from swimming to biking or from swimming to running. So you need to incorporate your land sprints. Go to a track and make sure you pump the right muscles and exercise the right breathing patterns for your tennis.

3. Kicking: Your kicking exercises are excellent for strengthening your stomach, removing the lactic acid in your muscles from a long match, etc..

So all in all, swimming is great! Just know that you still need to do tennis specific training as well. Dont do too much with the shoulders, keep it light. If you do want to overload the shoulders a little or build up, I would suggest getting some Zoomers (or whatever is new out there) to help lift the body more out of the water. This will improve your ability to move through the water and take pressure off the shoulders.

Marius_Hancu
10-10-2005, 07:41 AM
more appropriate for the Health forum, but anyway ...

check my posting there:

WTA Tour: Aquatic Therapy for Tennis
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=71569

Bungalo Bill
10-10-2005, 09:02 AM
more appropriate for the Health forum, but anyway ...

check my posting there:

WTA Tour: Aquatic Therapy for Tennis
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=71569

That is a great article Marius and very true indeed. I just caution swimmers to be careful when they load the shoudler muscles from paddles or other drag creating devices.

If anyone is getting back into swimming it would be prudent to invest in some Zoomers to take stress off the shoulders, achieve an aerobic benefit, strengthen the leg muscles, and help stretch the ankle area.

x Southpaw x
10-10-2005, 11:12 AM
I think the footwork in swimming and tennis don't go together. In swimming, you need to create a wide angle with foot/ankle so as to be effective, especially in flutter and dolphin kick, your toes point as far backward as possible. Tennis meanwhile is brake, run, brake, run, you use your heels for braking and your toes from split-step and similar. Swimming kicks from the hips while tennis is running using muscles below the hips.

Arm-wise I'm not sure, I think getting strong arms in tennis might help with strong arms for swimming. Remember that like tennis, swimming has its proper technique and advanced stroke.

Bungalo Bill
10-10-2005, 11:35 AM
I think the footwork in swimming and tennis don't go together. In swimming, you need to create a wide angle with foot/ankle so as to be effective, especially in flutter and dolphin kick, your toes point as far backward as possible.

Yes, quite true. The benefits for tennis in the lower body area with swimming are flexibility, range of motion, massaging out the lactic acid from a long match.

When exercising the lower body in swimming you can gain strength in the hip flexors, a little in the hammies, and the thighs. But yes, this is sport specific with a some crossover.

Swimming kicks from the hips while tennis is running using muscles below the hips.

Some gain can be transferred in helping the hip flexors loosen up and strengthen but for the most part you are correct.

Arm-wise I'm not sure, I think getting strong arms in tennis might help with strong arms for swimming. Remember that like tennis, swimming has its proper technique and advanced stroke.

The arms will have more transfer as a swimmer in the latter part of the stroke pushes water or pulls at the beginnning of hand entry into the water. The shoulder area is strengthened and range of motion is exercised.

The biggest gain in swimming for tennis is:

1. A reduction in lactic acid buildup in the legs - it is therapuetic.

2. It helps in muscle balance.

3. It exercises all the muscles with resistance.

Mahboob Khan
10-11-2005, 07:06 AM
From the above discussions it has been established:

-- Swimming alone for tennis conditioning will not cut it.

-- If you do swim, complement it with other activities such as running on a track, sprinting on a track, football and basketball if possible. These other (complementary) sports/activities will convey the benefits of swimming or in that case swimming will not hurt you.

-- Swimming is a great rehabilitational tool if you are recovering from a shoulder, knee, or ankle injuries.