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ktncnttl
10-10-2005, 06:55 AM
This guy only has 3.5 strokes but 6.0 court sense. I consider myself having 4.0 strokes but I usually lose. He has excellent control of the depth, height and direction of the ball. I just can't get into a groove at all when I play him. If I step behind the baseline he would give me a short slice to draw me in and then he will hit a deep shot with decent pace to pass me. If I come in to the net myself, he has about ten ways to pass me so that doesn't work neither. Most of the time I find myself at no man's land because I don't want to go behind the baseline to give him the chance to slice me a short one nor do I want to go to the net. The only way I can win is to overpower him from no man's land but that is hit or miss and most of the time I will miss. I feel like Andy Roddick playing Federer. Help!

Marius_Hancu
10-10-2005, 08:13 AM
try to wrong-foot him whenever possible
also hit at his BH hip or his feet
and yes, overpower him, but remain in control

also, check the my posting on Playing Pushers
in the Sticky

JeffH1
10-10-2005, 08:54 AM
that if He has "excellent control of the depth, height and direction of the ball" and also has great court sense, then maybe he is the 4.0+ player. You loose because you don't have the skills to beat him. Hone the skills needed and you'll become more competitive. Agassi has a model baseline game. The other players run back and forth, and Agassi stands in the middle of the court controlling the point. As far as Roddick is concerned, he doesn't control anything. He just hits hard. As far as Federer is concerned, you can't be taught those skills they come to you by devine intervention

ktncnttl
10-10-2005, 10:27 AM
try to wrong-foot him whenever possible
also hit at his BH hip or his feet
and yes, overpower him, but remain in control

also, check the my posting on Playing Pushers
in the Sticky

I don't think he is a pusher per se. No he doesn't have a power weapon but his slices (both fore and backhand) and lobs are excellent. Unlike most pushers, he also has a decent forehand with which he can hit a short ball into the corners with decent power. Since his control of depth, height and direction is excellent, coming to the net against him is suicidal because he can beat you by passing you (direction) or lobbing you (height) or hitting the ball at your foot (depth). These are all excellent weapons. His sole weakness is the backhand which he slices only but since his slice is so good it is not really a weakness afterall. He also has some trouble with moonballs but I don't want to beat him with moonballs.

As I said before, my only chance is to overpower him from the baseline which I do sometimes but the odds are against me.

Jon Hampton
10-10-2005, 12:00 PM
that if He has "excellent control of the depth, height and direction of the ball" and also has great court sense, then maybe he is the 4.0+ player

I agree with Jeff here. If someone can pinpoint the depth and control their shots that well, they are NOT a 3.5 player. If anything, this guy sounds like a 4.5'er. You don't need a powerful weapon or quickness to be a 4.5 player. If anything it's knowing when and how to make the shots that you have the most effective they can be.

PM_
10-10-2005, 12:30 PM
This guy only has 3.5 strokes but 6.0 court sense. I consider myself having 4.0 strokes but I usually lose. He has excellent control of the depth, height and direction of the ball. I just can't get into a groove at all when I play him. If I step behind the baseline he would give me a short slice to draw me in and then he will hit a deep shot with decent pace to pass me. If I come in to the net myself, he has about ten ways to pass me so that doesn't work neither. Most of the time I find myself at no man's land because I don't want to go behind the baseline to give him the chance to slice me a short one nor do I want to go to the net. The only way I can win is to overpower him from no man's land but that is hit or miss and most of the time I will miss. I feel like Andy Roddick playing Federer. Help!

You just answered your own question. This "3.5er" obviously doesn't have powerful groundstrokes so play in front of the baseline work your own magic.

lcw
10-10-2005, 12:43 PM
This guy only has 3.5 strokes but 6.0 court sense. I consider myself having 4.0 strokes but I usually lose. He has excellent control of the depth, height and direction of the ball. I just can't get into a groove at all when I play him. If I step behind the baseline he would give me a short slice to draw me in and then he will hit a deep shot with decent pace to pass me. If I come in to the net myself, he has about ten ways to pass me so that doesn't work neither. Most of the time I find myself at no man's land because I don't want to go behind the baseline to give him the chance to slice me a short one nor do I want to go to the net. The only way I can win is to overpower him from no man's land but that is hit or miss and most of the time I will miss. I feel like Andy Roddick playing Federer. Help!

First start by respecting his game. We men let our ego stand in the way of logic.
Second after you admit he is better, work on your game one phase at the time. If he passes you when you come to the net, either your approach shot is not good enough, or you need to work on your volley.
If he 'drop shot you' , your shots either lack pace or placement.
A good drop shot happens only if the opposing player has plenty of time to execute it. Examine your game and not his.
Good luck.

goober
10-10-2005, 04:35 PM
If you are a 4.0+ player, you should win the point most of the time if he hits a shortball to you that is not a dropshot. You should be able to hit a winner or a good enough approach shot that gives you a weak reply that you can put away.

If he has problems with moonballs you should be mixing moonballs in a lot. A lot of finesse players with great placement have difficulty handling power. So I would work on consistent power shots and moonballs against him and work on your shortball/net game.

Mahboob Khan
10-10-2005, 05:26 PM
My reading is that you ought to improve your own game to beat him or similar players. And let's see whether you can implement the following:

When you are serving: Minimize double faults. Try to put the first serve even it is medium and vary it wide, body, up the T.

When he is serving: Watch the toss as it goes up. An instant before he hits, you split step to move either direction to return the serve. Yes, you ought to return it deep either cross court or down the middle. On second serve, crack a winner down the line or play an aggressive return to make him stretch!

When you both are rallying from the baseline:

-- Red/Difficult ball: When you find yourself several feet behind the baseline, think about more topspin. The ball should clear the net by 5 to 6 feet. This will also assure depth on your ground strokes.

-- Yellow/medium difficulty: Your position is either on or inside the baseline. Try to be aggressive in your ground strokes. Move him around side to side. You are trying to cook the point in an aggressive way.

-- Green/short/easier ball: If the ball is above the level of the net, go for a screamer (winner), if the ball is below the level of the net, go approach shot and to the net for volley/smash.

-- When he attacks: Keep your passing shots low and dipping. Remember, lob is also a passing shot!

And good luck. You ought to have a good technical base to implement the above tactical plan.

armand
10-10-2005, 06:12 PM
Most of the time I find myself at no man's land because I don't want to go behind the baseline to give him the chance to slice me a short one nor do I want to go to the net. The only way I can win is to overpower him from no man's land but that is hit or miss and most of the time I will miss.If you can't finish off points by bone-crushing short balls, then you have a major flaw in your game. The mid range is where most points are won.
To hit a good shot at midrange, remember to shorten the back swing, and hit with some more spin. Oh and if you think you can get away with taking your eye off the ball here like you might do at the baseline, you'd be gravely mistaken.

Mahboob Khan
10-11-2005, 05:00 PM
And try to develop your own court sense to outsense his court sense!

rfederer32291
10-11-2005, 05:18 PM
use the angles, wrong foot him and try to over power him, many players cant control power very well