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Maledizione
10-10-2005, 11:33 PM
Oh my goodness this is THE grip for serves!!
I was playing a match this weekend and during the warm-ups I decided to use this grip to serve, since my opponent was going to be practising returning my serve and I didn't want him to practise returning my flat serve.

First time using this grip and I whack this topspin serve down the T. It just clicked. The funny thing is I could REALLY give the ball my all, and it would still go in. I have never hit an ace against this opponent and I hit 4 during the match and also got a number of errors of the serve. First match in a while where I wasn't worried sick about holding serve.
I especially enjoyed the slice serve to the corner that 'ran away' (his words not mine) from my opponent.

On an unrelated note, I have a question about stance for return of serve.
I stand angled into the court i.e on the deuce court, my right foot is further up then the left.
On the ad court, sometimes it will be the exact same stance, or perfectly horizontal. Is this normal?

papa
10-11-2005, 04:53 AM
Eastern backhand grip is great for serving especially when your trying to get more top or spin on the ball.

Stance for receiving really is a personal preference type thing - some like a staggered stance others don't. It can be more difficult getting to a ball hit to the side where the foot is out in front so don't get too wild about it.

Tennismastery
10-11-2005, 06:21 AM
Yes, using the eastern backhand grip for your serve can open your eyes up to more spin and action. Most players will need to stand more closed to accomadate the additional curve the serve will take; ie: right-handers will need to aim more to the right as the eastern backhand grip will generally make the ball hook more to the left. (Unless the server tosses the ball up over their head in which case they can hit a more significant topspin serve down the middle.)

However, you don't see very many pros doing this. What we do see on tour is the position of the wrist more turned in, mimicing the racquet's orientation to that of an eastern backhand grip. In many cases, those who think the pros are using an eastern backhand grip they are only using a continental with the wrist in the position I mentioned. (The wrist is turned more 'palm in' towards the server.) Using the eastern backhand grip for most people will reduce the potential pace and can be a little difficult for most people to become accomplished with.

If you use the continental grip and hold the wrist in at the angle I mentioned, you can get all the spin components of an eastern backhand grip yet not give your serve away. Try it.

kevhen
10-11-2005, 06:39 AM
Eastern backhand is especially great for slice serves where can hit with power and spin and get a high percent in and watch your opponent deal with the nasty bounce and sideways movement.

My eastern backhand topspin moves slower but I get the occasional ace and can go way out wide on the ad court.

I don't use continental like everyone else, it's either eastern backhand or eastern forehand grips for me. Welcome to the wonderful world of the eastern backhand where you can add even more spin to your serve.

x Southpaw x
10-11-2005, 07:23 AM
Oh my goodness this is THE grip for serves!!
I was playing a match this weekend and during the warm-ups I decided to use this grip to serve, since my opponent was going to be practising returning my serve and I didn't want him to practise returning my flat serve.

First time using this grip and I whack this topspin serve down the T. It just clicked. The funny thing is I could REALLY give the ball my all, and it would still go in. I have never hit an ace against this opponent and I hit 4 during the match and also got a number of errors of the serve. First match in a while where I wasn't worried sick about holding serve.
I especially enjoyed the slice serve to the corner that 'ran away' (his words not mine) from my opponent.

On an unrelated note, I have a question about stance for return of serve.
I stand angled into the court i.e on the deuce court, my right foot is further up then the left.
On the ad court, sometimes it will be the exact same stance, or perfectly horizontal. Is this normal?
Funny, that was exactly what I used to do. Grab that eastern backhand grip and attempt to serve flat bombs.

mistapooh
10-11-2005, 10:14 AM
I'm in the midst of trying to switch from eastern bh grip to a continental right now. I feel I get more pop from the continental, but it's probably my contact point to the ball.

monologuist
10-11-2005, 12:17 PM
has anyone heard of eastern bh grip serves being conducive to getting golfer's elbow (pain onthe inside edge of elbow as ooposed to t.e. which is outside edge)?

kevhen
10-11-2005, 01:03 PM
Yeah I agree with that as sometimes mine is a little sore on the lower inside, but doesn't feel as severe when I used to get elbow pain from hitting slow slice serves using a bent arm and too much arm motion. Now I straighten the arm and let the grip create the slice spin instead of using the elbow twist to create the spin.

monologuist
10-11-2005, 01:34 PM
Yeah I agree with that as sometimes mine is a little sore on the lower inside, but doesn't feel as severe when I used to get elbow pain from hitting slow slice serves using a bent arm and too much arm motion. Now I straighten the arm and let the grip create the slice spin instead of using the elbow twist to create the spin.

could you elaborate on what you did to change your technique? My pain is right near the "funny bone"....I've tried relaxing my arm and grip, but it seems that this grip kind of just forces you to twist your elbow in an unorthodox way when you pronate, in order to get any pace on the ball. If I just "let the grip do the work", and serve in what's a natural motion to me, the ball goes into the net...I feel the pain when I'm trying to compensat for that by hitting up more, then following through with a pronation to get the ball moving forward more instead of just up.