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View Full Version : singles vs. doubles volleying


vkartikv
10-12-2005, 02:44 PM
I am able to transition into the volley right after the serve and volley with as much as 80% accuracy. But when I play doubles and I am not serving (just standing there at the net) my reflexes are not as good as when I am serving&volleying in one continuous motion. I have a good stance but I am still unable to match my s&v performance in doubles. any suggestions?

golden chicken
10-12-2005, 03:00 PM
don't "just stand there"!!!

be on your toes and ready to move forwards to intercept anything you can. make sure you are moving forwards when you volley and not simply standing there blocking the ball back and you'll put away most volleys.

remember that when you s&v you are moving in. when you're up at net, the tendency is to "just stand there." that's why sometimes volleys suffer in doubles.

i like to start around the service line as my partner serves (maybe a step or two inside) and actually move in as if i had just hit an approach shot right after my partner makes contact. then, it's kind of like s&v except that i didn't serve.

also, make sure your racket is up and ready to defend against hard body shots.

vkartikv
10-12-2005, 03:18 PM
I am unsure about doubles ethics, is it ok to start out at the service line and sneak in?

B5002
10-12-2005, 03:40 PM
I am unsure about doubles ethics, is it ok to start out at the service line and sneak in?
Yeah that's definetly ok. My coach always says its better if both back rather than staggered. So you guys can both start back and move up together.

misterg
10-13-2005, 01:31 AM
"Stay" behind the service line and than move forward.

killer
10-13-2005, 02:47 PM
i'd definitely condone waiting for your partner to return serve on or just behind the service line, and look to move in and cut off a weak first volley from your opponents (if your partner's return is good).
The only time i'd ever really play 'both back' on the return game is if your opponents have a) a huge serve and/or b) a great poach and/or c) you or your partner don't have a good return of serve. Playing both back leaves a lot of the forecourt open for drop volleys.

ChicagoJack
10-15-2005, 07:32 PM
When I play, we have it worked out so the server lets me know where both serves are going. We meet after every point as we gather up the balls. He will say something like "hard T, then slice wide. I decide on what I am doing at the net based on the serve then give him hand signals at that point. For hard T, I might signal a poach, for slice wide I might fake and stay.

You don't have as much time to react in doubles as you do in singles. If you know what kind of serve your opponent will get, you can see the ball much earlier and anticipate sooner. If you are communicating with the server in this way, you are involved with every serve.

Decide where your target point is, where you are going to hit it before every serve. Have two options, one for a high return, one for a low return. You don't have enough time to decide while the ball is coming at you.

when the server and net man work together in this way, you only have to volley well enough to have them worry about you. You can create a lot of unforced errors in this way.

-Jack

Geezer Guy
10-17-2005, 12:02 PM
Whether my partner is serving or returning serve, I start out a little behind the traditional point I'm supposed to start, then step forward and split-step as my opponent is getting ready to return my partners shot. This helps me get my mind into the point, and be ready (both physically and mentally) for whatever comes back.

Marius_Hancu
10-18-2005, 12:09 PM
http://www.operationdoubles.com

Bungalo Bill
10-18-2005, 05:41 PM
I am able to transition into the volley right after the serve and volley with as much as 80% accuracy. But when I play doubles and I am not serving (just standing there at the net) my reflexes are not as good as when I am serving&volleying in one continuous motion. I have a good stance but I am still unable to match my s&v performance in doubles. any suggestions?

You have to develop your reflexes, awareness, and ability to "read" the hitter mainly before the ball is struck or slightly thereof. Doubles is largely quick reflex volleys and you are moving from a somewhat of a stationary position (mostly and should at least be on your toes), determining if you are able to volley the ball and on what side you will be making your volley (backhand and forehand).

1. One drill I know will help is volleying against the wall. Stand roughly 6 feet in front of the wall and volley the ball without letting it hit the ground. Make soft volleys but firm enough to allow you to hit the next one the same.

2. Another drill is to get your partner and a ball machine. Have the ball machine feed the ball to your partner at the baseline and direct the ball to either side of you. He can hit it anyway he wants, fast slow, dipping, with slice, etc...

3. Practice your short crosscourt volleys. Both of you stand in the service boxes diaganol of each other and volley the ball back and forth.

4. Get your head in the game and learn to think that every ball is coming to you, how you can cause the ball to come to you, and how you can influence or cut off the opponents angles to make them commit the error.

Fay
04-14-2008, 04:17 PM
1. One drill I know will help is volleying against the wall. Stand roughly 6 feet in front of the wall and volley the ball without letting it hit the ground. Make soft volleys but firm enough to allow you to hit the next one the same.

2. Another drill is to get your partner and a ball machine. Have the ball machine feed the ball to your partner at the baseline and direct the ball to either side of you. He can hit it anyway he wants, fast slow, dipping, with slice, etc...

3. Practice your short crosscourt volleys. Both of you stand in the service boxes diaganol of each other and volley the ball back and forth.

4. Get your head in the game and learn to think that every ball is coming to you, how you can cause the ball to come to you, and how you can influence or cut off the opponents angles to make them commit the error.

GREAT DRILLS ! Thank you !!

Tennisman912
04-14-2008, 07:54 PM
vkartikv,

Some good advice above. You definitely want to be moving around as the ball is moving. The biggest reason your volley is not as good is you are just not ready to hit it. Very few can watch their partner hit and then watch the ball realize it is going to the net man and then get ready to hit it (I can't at the higher levels). You must always be ready and watching. You will know one is coming two ways. You will see it coming out of the corner of your eye and more importantly, you should be watching your opponents eyes to know when they are getting ready to hit the ball. That and keeping your racket up and knees flexed is about all you really need to know. That and practice.

Good tennis

TM

TonyB
04-14-2008, 08:17 PM
Guys, this thread is almost 3 years old.


How the heck do these threads keep popping up??

It's okay to use the search function to find information, but for Pete's sake, stop replying to them as though the original poster is still waiting for your replies.

Djokovicfan4life
04-14-2008, 08:32 PM
Drill #2 is great! I never even thought of using a ball machine and a partner at the same time! Can't wait until I get my Silent Partner! Thanks BB! :)

Solat
04-14-2008, 11:43 PM
Drill #2 is great! I never even thought of using a ball machine and a partner at the same time! Can't wait until I get my Silent Partner! Thanks BB! :)

I know! now all i need is a ball machine!.....



and a friend :(

Bungalo Bill
04-15-2008, 07:16 AM
Drill #2 is great! I never even thought of using a ball machine and a partner at the same time! Can't wait until I get my Silent Partner! Thanks BB! :)

You guys are digging up some old stuff. That drill is a lot of fun. How is the quality of the Silent Partner these days? I have a portable Sports Tutor in the garage.

PimpMyGame
04-15-2008, 07:20 AM
FWIW, I think volleying in doubles is more difficult than in singles - you need to be more accurate and a common mistake is overplaying the shot when it's perfectly fine to just get the ball back and wait for your chance. In singles most volleys don't come back because of the amount of space you have to hit into.

5263
04-15-2008, 07:49 AM
Golden Chicken is right on the money. Start just inside the service line and start moving in with the serve and this helps with another BIG thing too,

Follow the ball!

If the serve goes left, track in towards the left and if it goes rt, then track in towards the right.

this will help you to be in optimal position for court coverage. It will also keep you from getting passed down the line on wide serves and p-ssing off your server, since he can't help you over there like he can in the middle.

Nothing worse than being down Luv -30 and having your partner step into the middle, putting you in I formation, when you have served wide, then watching it sail down his alley to put u down luv 40!:twisted:

Loco4Tennis
04-15-2008, 08:40 AM
i actually saw one of the brian brothers do this on a video i saw of them,
it made sense after further discussion here
start at the line of the service box and keep constanttly moving to the front
the constant movement to the front keept me on my toes and not as flat footed as i use to be, further more, when your gonna volley, the fact that your moving forward also aids in the volley punch

Djokovicfan4life
04-15-2008, 08:45 AM
You guys are digging up some old stuff. That drill is a lot of fun. How is the quality of the Silent Partner these days? I have a portable Sports Tutor in the garage.

I just know that most people like them. I'm no pro or anything, I'm only 18. That drill is just what my net game needs though, I get passed more than Roddick at net!

And no, I don't approach cross-court. :wink: