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View Full Version : Looking to purchase machine, have questions...please help.


tmoney37
05-23-2004, 08:13 PM
Hello,

I am looking to purchase a stringer for myself. I don't have a lot of money so I was looking at the Klippermate because of the price and it seems to get the best reviews out of any stringer in that price range. (is it just me or is Eagnas total junk?). I pretty much will only be stringing my racquets and my girlfriends'. We both use stiff high end racquets (I play with Head i.Prestige Mids and she uses Wilson ProStaff 6.1 Classics...I also on occasion play with my old, and classic, Prince Graphite 90s). I will mostly be using SynGut 16 or Wilson's Sensation. I have some experience stringing, as I strung for a couple of summers at the pro shop where I worked when off from college. However, we had a Babolat Star 3 Double Line which I refer to as the Rolls Royce of stringing machines and was very easy to use and a far cry from the Klippermate ($145 to $4,000). Thus, I have no experience with a drop-weight stringer or using floating clamps and I have two questions:

1) How far off the mark are drop weights? I am about a 4.0 player and wouldn't be that concerned if it was a few pounds off but I seem to read some reviews of machines being up to 10lbs off.

2) My biggest concern is the two point mounting system. I have read mostly bad things about this system, though a few counter arguments (stability vs. allowing the racquet to go through its natural flexion). Has anyone had bad experiences with it (i.e. - breaking your frame?). Any education on the two point mounting system would be great.

Thanks in advance for any help you can give me.

Deuce
05-23-2004, 11:34 PM
A drop weight machine which is made correctly will generally be even more accurate than will any electronic machine - including your 'Rolls Royce'. There is no substitute for good ol' gravity.

Two point mounting systems are fine if you know what you're doing, and are not stringing ridiculously large and light frames. You should also look at the ATS Super Stringer 2 - same price as the Klipper, but more practical to use.
www.atssports.com

If you want to spend a little more ($200, I believe), there is the Silent Partner Swing, which has a 6 point inside mount.
www.sptennis.com

That 6.1 Classic is the easiest racquet to string I've ever had the pleasure of stringing, by the way. Smart girl. Marry her now.

tmoney37
05-24-2004, 11:55 AM
Thanks for pointing me to these other two machines. I really like the six point system and clutch of the Silent Partner Swing. Anyone have experience with Silent Partner?

Thanks
-Thiago

Deuce
05-24-2004, 01:00 PM
I've strung several racquets on a Silent Partner Swing. I've also strung many racquets on the Super Stringer 2, and I have a friend who has a Klipper, so I've seen that one in action, as well.

The Swing is a good machine with better (all metal) flying clamps than either the Klipper or the Super Stringer 2. It is also heavier (and thus more stable) than the other two. The clutch arm in the Swing is the same as the ratchet arm in the Super Stringer 2 - the only difference is that the clutch is silent (as in Silent Partner), and the ratchet makes... well, a ratcheting noise. (Yes, I know that the name Silent Partner originated with ball machines, and not the silent clutch.) The Klipper has neither a clutch, nor a ratchet arm, thus making it a little more difficult to adjust the proper tension.

The clamps of the Super Stringer 2 are plastic (they call it 'composite). They are more large and bulky than 'normal' clamps. On the machine that I've used, they started slipping after about 100 string jobs. The wind around drum string gripper/tension head (also plastic) also started slipping at the same time. Using a $1 bill to grip the string in both the gripper and the clamps has solved this problem.

The Swing I've used is still rather new (perhaps 25 to 30 stringings thus far), and has been trouble free to this point. As I mentioned, the clamps are all metal - as is the string gripper/tension head.

All three of these machines will string your racquets competently. Figure out how many racquets you'll be stringing on average, and how much money you're willing to spend. And remember to keep some money for the wedding.

iamamultitasker
05-25-2004, 08:46 AM
I have had a Klippermate for 2 years and would say without question that it has paid for itself many times over. I am a 4.5/5.0 player who strings once a week and am very particular about strings and string jobs which is why I bought it. I can also tell you that my string jobs are a lot better than what I use to get from the shop.

The only thing I would say about the Klipper is that you might be better off with something more expensive if you are all thumbs. The Klipper requires more manual dexterity and judgement than higher end machines where they take a lot of the difficulty away. Still, 30 minutes once a week is not all that bad.

The 2-point mounting system hasn't damaged any of my 4 racquets yet (knocking on wood), so I am fairly confident that it works.

kninetik
05-25-2004, 08:56 AM
Might as well put my input here since I own an SP Stringer. It's my first stringing machine and I love that clutch system! I can't imagine figuring out how much slack to use to get EXACTLY the tension I want. Also having that 6pt-mount system gives me extra confidence in the machine but I don't see why a 2 point can't do the same. One problem I found with the clutch system... sometimes if you overcompensate and adjust the clutch too far and you want to start the string over, the gripper just wont let go of the string. I fudged up one set of strings because I had to cut off the string. However one job I became cautious and never happened again! Overall good stringer!

David Pavlich
05-25-2004, 01:48 PM
My first machine was a Klipper. The ratcheting systems are more convenient for sure. I don't know how many frames I strung on it, but I never cracked one nor did my son when he used it. Granted, never did one of the major snowshoes on it, but it did work well, albeit slow.

The drop weights are accurate, but you have to be very good with the drop arm. There's another post somewhere around here that shows the deviations if the drop arm isn't positioned correctly.

The electronic machines today are very accurate time after time. There is no concern about angles of arms. If the machines weren't the best available, the touring pros would not allow them at the tournaments. The new electronics use a microprocessor/load cell combination to measure the tension. It is extremely sensitive and extremely accurate.

David

SW Stringer
05-25-2004, 07:39 PM
"The drop weights are accurate, but you have to be very good with the drop arm. There's another post somewhere around here that shows the deviations if the drop arm isn't positioned correctly."

Drop weights are extremely accurate, when level, there is NO ERROR, and with or without the ratchet mechanism getting level is no big deal, except for those out there pushing their favorite machine.

"The electronic machines today are very accurate time after time. There is no concern about angles of arms. If the machines weren't the best available, the touring pros would not allow them at the tournaments. The new electronics use a microprocessor/load cell combination to measure the tension. It is extremely sensitive and extremely accurate."

The Star 3 and 4 accuracy is +/- 100 grams resolution which is about a quarter pound which is equivalent to +/- 5 degrees on a drop weight machine with reference weight of 60 pounds. The Wise head display increments in tenths of a pound, but the accuracy of the tensioning device is not a published specification - except they do say it's more accurate than the Babolat Star machines.

The electronic machines are convenient and simple to use, I wouldn't say accurate since the manufacturers won't publish those specifications and probably for a good reason. If you want accuracy use a dropweight. For speed and convenience and no choice but what you're given in accuracy (who knows what it is) go electronic.

Deuce
05-25-2004, 10:36 PM
I agree with SW about dropweights. Because it relies only on gravity, it's the only system that, if you use it correctly, is guaranteed to be accurate all the time - or at least for as long as Earth retains its current orbit.

I trust gravity far more than I trust electronics and microchips - simply because gravity has proven to be more reliable. Again, it's like cameras. Some people may like cameras that do everything for them - all they have to do is press the shutter button. Others may prefer a more manual approach, where they have to do more, but are rewarded by having more input into the process.

If I had a choice between a dropweight and an electronic stringing machine, the mounting systems and clamps of both machines being equal, I'd choose the dropweight in a heartbeat - even if the electronic machine was the latest Babolat machine costing $10,000 or so. I'd choose the $400 dropweight every time. A table-top model, which I can take out to the park on a nice afternoon and string a couple of frames. Can't do that with an electronic...