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View Full Version : Proof from Wilson that Federer NEVER used a Tour 90


BreakPoint
05-24-2004, 12:13 PM
May 24, 2004

Federer keeps abreast of technological advances
By Ashling O'Connor
There is a new weapon in the world No 1’s armoury



ROGER FEDERER’S game is already considered beautiful to behold. So it may come as a surprise that the world No 1 has had cosmetic surgery on his racket. When Federer, the Wimbledon and Australian Open champion, steps on court at Roland Garros this week in his bid for the French Open title, it will be with an injection of silicone implants in his graphite frame.
The 22-year-old from Switzerland hopes that the “molecular nanotechnology” will give him the edge he lacks on clay. In the past two years Federer has not made it past the first round of the French Open and this year’s draw potentially pits him against Gustavo Kuerten, the three-times winner, in the third round.



The revolutionary new technology developed over the past two years by Amer Sports, the company that owns the Wilson brand, involves the injection of silicone oxide crystals into the microscopic air pockets between the graphite fibres in an ordinary tennis racket. The result is twice the strength and twice the stability. Wilson claims that the racket is 22 per cent more powerful than carbon fibre.

“The racket is stiffer and more powerful. It’s more controllable because the silicone can be placed in certain spots,” Roger Talermo, chief executive of Amer Sports, said.

Federer has been practising with the new nCode Six One Tour racket — branded in his red and white national colours — for two months. It is his first change in model for six years. “He is completely happy,” Talermo said. “The top players are so picky, he would not put it in his hands if he was not 100 per cent confident.” Amer Sports, which also makes Atomic skis and Precor fitness machines, is the first tennis racket manufacturer to apply nanotechnology to its products. It initially injected silicone, best known for its use in breast implants, into its Double Core tennis balls, giving them durability beyond the standard set and a half of play. The technology has been used to improve ski wax and is being developed in the aerospace industry.

The company hopes that all its tennis players, including the Williams sisters and Justine Henin-Hardenne, the No 1-ranked female player, will be serving with silicone by the US Open in August. More than a third of tour professionals play with Wilson rackets. The racket will retail for £150.

AAAA
05-24-2004, 12:42 PM
I'm not sure a ceo knows all the minute details of who uses what or a sales rep is always factually correct.

Richie Rich
05-24-2004, 02:08 PM
Like he is going to use the new ncode frame that we will be buying off the shelf??? :roll: Fed will continue to use a painted PS 6.0 85 or a painted custom made stick from Wilson (do a search here on Fed's racquet and you will see the debate)

PistolPete
05-24-2004, 02:43 PM
Although I think Federer hasn't used the tour 90 recently if at all, this article isn't proof that federer NEVER used the tour 90. What are you talking about?

AAAA
05-24-2004, 02:52 PM
1) To my knowledge there are two professional stringers who post on this board. One of them said Federer was using a retail Tour 90 but others, who claimed no first hand experience of handling Federer's racquet, didn't believe him.

2) A debate between people who have never even picked up Federer's racquet has no evidence stronger than conjecture.

CEOs manage the big picture, they lead people. Press releases are usually drafted by PR/marketing.

BreakPoint
05-24-2004, 03:06 PM
Yes, but I would hope that the marketing people wouldn't put that "it's his first change in racquet in six years" in print without it having some shred of truth to it. I mean, they wouldn't want to so blatently open themselves up to lawsuits do they? But then again, this is a tennis racquet company, and like all the others, are guilty of the liberal use of paintjobs so they are accustommed to using a lot of marketing spin in their PR. But then again, these companies haven't exactly come out in writing stating that their sponsored pros DO NOT use paintjobs.

Anonymous
05-24-2004, 03:14 PM
Hey Breakpoint, way to steal my post...


I'm just kidding, but how can an 85 inch racquet so easily look like a 95 then a 90? amazing isn't it

AAAA
05-24-2004, 03:27 PM
Yes, but I would hope that the marketing people wouldn't put that "it's his first change in racquet in six years" in print without it having some shred of truth to it.

Marketing material often has small print somewhere with words to the effect of:

<Insert Company> reserve the right to correct or amend any and all details on this document instantly and without prior notice. This document is marketing material and in no way constitutes a contract between <Insert Company> and the reader. This document is not legally binding.

Look I searched through some of my magazines for adverts and found this, quote:

While every effort is made to ensure that products, prices, specifications, colors are correct at time of printing <insert company> cannot be held responsible for any errors or product changes.


They are basically saying they are not responsible so they have covered their own backs.

lendl lives
05-25-2004, 02:45 PM
i saw a highlight of fed today, man he's hitting a lot harder than in his last few matches i've seen.

PrestigeClassic
05-25-2004, 03:57 PM
That's why they call them highlights . . .

BigboyDan
05-25-2004, 07:18 PM
Well, if Fed truly never used a real Tour 90 - man, what a big lie. Frankly, I'm not sure what this would mean.

BreakPoint
05-25-2004, 08:14 PM
Well, if Fed truly never used a real Tour 90 - man, what a big lie. Frankly, I'm not sure what this would mean.

All of pro tennis is a big lie. It doesn't actually exist. It's just a figment of our imaginations. :wink: 8) :lol:

Cigo
05-26-2004, 06:44 AM
That's how the Matrix controls us... :shock:

ProStaffTour90
05-26-2004, 07:22 AM
How can we explain the differening string patterns between racquets!when he used the PS 85 and HyperProStaff Paintjob there was one less cross than when he started using the tour 90, so surely a racquet change!

StewieGriffin
05-29-2004, 10:48 AM
It's a modified racquet using a Tour 90 Mold

-------Think about this-------
If he wanted an 85 sq in. racquet, wouldn't they just have used a PS 85 mold?

.... instead of going through the trouble of creating a 85 sq.in. mold with throat flanges(the tapers on the inner-upper 2 corners of the neck triangle) and PWSs similar to a Tour 90 (the tapers on a 85 are squarer than his - a Tour 90's PWS has flatter tapers into the head), and still not convincing people ??? And if they went through the trouble of doing that, as you're suggesting - It's no longer a PS 85, nor is it a Tour 90.

If you're not saying this, you're saying that they chipped away or carved out part of a PS 85 to make it look like a Tour 90 with the flanges. What happens to a racquet when you remove a large chunk of graphite???

kxt1780
05-29-2004, 03:33 PM
Federer has been using racket with 16x19 string pattern. PS 85 head is 16x18. Thus whatever he has been using, it cannot be from the PS 85 mold.

gregraven
06-01-2004, 07:07 AM
(snip)
Federer has been practising with the new nCode Six One Tour racket — branded in his red and white national colours — for two months. It is his first change in model for six years. “He is completely happy,” [Roger] Talermo said.
(snip)
Even though I don't know Roger Talermo, I'm certain he's a sharp guy who is good at his job. However, when you look at the names of the persons at Wilson who actually provide racquets to the pros, you immediately notice that his name is not on the list. Given how badly journalists can mangle the facts even in simple stories, I would check with someone in the know at Wilson before jumping to the conclusion that Talermo was accurately quoted, and that he is correct in what he said.