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Smooothone23
10-27-2005, 09:01 AM
I was stringing the other night and after taking the clamp off to move it, the strings had indentations in them. Will this hurt the life of the string? I loosened the clamps up a bit but they were still a little bit indented. I was stringing with Signum PPP 17 gauge on a Klippermate.

Any thoughts on this?

Thanks

diredesire
10-27-2005, 10:06 AM
I was stringing the other night and after taking the clamp off to move it, the strings had indentations in them. Will this hurt the life of the string? I loosened the clamps up a bit but they were still a little bit indented. I was stringing with Signum PPP 17 gauge on a Klippermate.

Any thoughts on this?

Thanks

Signup PPP will not have any significant damage from over tightening your strings (IN GENERAL). It's not a good thing to have dents for sure, but crushing strings is typically a problem on multifilaments, not monofilaments like syn gut or poly.

I'd be more worried aobut knots ;D

max
10-27-2005, 10:09 AM
I agree with diredesire; note that tight clamps can also discolor a multi. . . although the last time this happened to me, for some reason the discoloration cleared up the next day.

dancraig
10-27-2005, 12:14 PM
I agree with diredesire; note that tight clamps can also discolor a multi. . . although the last time this happened to me, for some reason the discoloration cleared up the next day.

I think the discoloration of multifilaments is called "ghosting". I heard that it is almost unavoidable on some multifilaments.

Jerry Seinfeld
10-27-2005, 12:43 PM
Overtightening on the Poly Plasma can sometimes lead to premature breakage. Make sure your clamps are adjusted properly and that you use care when installing the Poly Plasma. If you are careful and use proper stringing techniques you will have no problems. If you abuse the string during installation it can come back to bite you by breaking early.

Smooothone23
10-27-2005, 01:15 PM
And in your opinion how tight is too tight to have a clamp adjusted. Is there a way to know how tight the clamp is to be on the strings besides the obvious answer of "if it is slipping it is not tight enough"?

Thanks

jj300
10-27-2005, 01:21 PM
I belive I read this somewhere but i'm not sure where. I had the same question on adjusting and the easiest way to do so. So I do this. I clamp the string and then unclamp and check if its discolored or crushed. If not I clamp it again and use 5-6 inches of the end of the string and pull the tension that I will be string at. If it doesn't slip its perfect if its slips I adjust the clamp and pull tension again to check. Works great for me. I never crushed any strings that way and if I do its at the very end of the string which I won't use anyway

Jerry Seinfeld
10-27-2005, 01:30 PM
Quantitatively it is hard to describe. The safest way is to take a scrap piece of string and test it. Make sure it isn't being crushed and that it does not slip when tension is pulled. I can almost always tell by how hard or easy my clamp closes on the string. I tend to go on feel but when I was starting out I did not have enough experience to just feel it and I had to take more time consuming measures just to be safe.

SW Stringer
10-27-2005, 02:25 PM
I agree with Seinfeld . . . it's hard to describe, but after a while you'll develop the "feel" and the sound of the "click" as the clamps close will be your guide.

For the novice stringer, though, once a good setting has been found for a particular string and tension, there is a way to repeat the process time after time. Go to Sears and purchase a set of feeler gauges (a few bucks, available in the automotive tool section - they were used to set the gap on the distributor points and gap the spark plugs).

Measure the gap on the clamps, record for future use, and when doing that same setup again, set the leafs to the desired gap, insert in the clamps, and adjust the knob, screw,etc to bottom out on the feeler gauge leafs. You can change the feeler gauge settings in one thousandth of an inch increments. Each leaf is clearly marked. Just add them up. Voila! Set, clamp, repeat.

diredesire
10-27-2005, 03:44 PM
great posts you two (right above me)

It's all about feel, the clamp should be firm to close, but not difficult. You shouldn't have to put an extraordinary amount of pressure/force on the clamps to shut them, but then again, you're using a flying clamp, which is why i didn't mention this fact in my first post. It's hard to get a feel because of various variables.

David Pavlich
10-27-2005, 04:36 PM
An obvious question that has been missed here...do you clean your clamps often? Klipper clamping surfaces are smooth and require frequent cleaning. Alcohol and a toothbrush work well. Clean clamps require less squeezing force to hold the string.

David

Smooothone23
10-28-2005, 06:51 AM
Those are all great ideas guys. Thanks for all the input. It is noce to get straight forward answers from all of you. i will be cleaning the clamps and doing some test clamping on my next string job which will be this weekend.

Again thanks.

racketrx
10-29-2005, 08:47 PM
David is right about cleaning the clamps. This is dependent on the type of clamps and the strings you're using. Some strings leave oily, slippery residue. I use eyeglass cleaning sheets to wide away the residue. (They are moistened with a little isopropyl alcohol.) Many clamps are easily adjusted and require some adjustment, particularly with a large change in string diameter., going from 15L to 18 gauge for example. Mine have a little hex screw on the front that is adjustable with an allen wrench. Some have larger finger adjustable knobs. As mentioned before you will gain a feel for this when you've adjusted to several different string constructions and diameters.