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spirit
10-28-2005, 06:52 AM
I strung my third racquet with my new Gamma x-2. I am still learning and so I find myself making mistakes. This time I got 4 or 5 mains strung and then I mistakenly took off the wrong clamp and lost all tension. I simply started over again, which meant the strings (the cheapest gamma synthetic gut), at least those that had been tensioned to that point, got tensioned twice. Then when I was finishing the string job, I found that when I did the tie off knot, the piece of string on the outside of the racquet that goes to the tie off hole was fairly loose after I did the tie off. I can still easily move this piece of string with my thumb or finger. And I noticed that the cross string nearest to the head of the racquet is faily loose (not much tension). However, I played with the racquet last night and it seems to hit fine. So my conclusion is that the final stringing result is fairly tolerant of mistakes, such as I made on this one. Can any of you more experienced stringers confirm this?

Funny thing is that if I had paid a stringer to string my racquet and they had given it back to me with these mistakes, I probably would have come down on him/her pretty hard.

tennisguy2121
10-28-2005, 07:51 AM
Well it depends on the person, whether they will notice a mistake on a string job, I would think a pro would, but a common person might not, you never know with people. At the shop I work at, it is done perfect, it is is strung again, my boss does not allow mistakes. Now on the last cross, do you think you might not have tensioned it? I have done that before, and had to restring it.

spirit
10-28-2005, 07:57 AM
Well it depends on the person, whether they will notice a mistake on a string job, I would think a pro would, but a common person might not, you never know with people. At the shop I work at, it is done perfect, it is is strung again, my boss does not allow mistakes. Now on the last cross, do you think you might not have tensioned it? I have done that before, and had to restring it.

I think I tensioned it. I wonder if the lack of tension is connected to the looseness in the piece of string going to the tie off hole. I also wonder that while the racquet played OK on my first hour of using it, that the string job might not hold up well over time because of the mistakes I made.

Mr Harharwood
10-28-2005, 08:26 AM
Your tie off strings on the mains and crosses like you mentioned will almost always be looser, dont worry too much about it as this is normal and should not affect the playing of the racquet. With time your tie offs will get better and you won't lose AS much tension. You probably will not notice the retensioning 4 or 5 of the mains. Just think of it as pre-stretching the string, haha. But generally speaking, dont tolerate any mistakes, you must take pride in any string job you do. Good luck.

Nuke
10-28-2005, 08:52 AM
I have never strung my own racquets, so excuse my ignorance if this is a dumb question, but wouldn't the tension on all the strings tend to even out after hitting with it for a short while? Are the strings so stiff that that one last, loose cross wouldn't take up some tension from its neighbors?

spirit
10-28-2005, 09:04 AM
I have never strung my own racquets, so excuse my ignorance if this is a dumb question, but wouldn't the tension on all the strings tend to even out after hitting with it for a short while? Are the strings so stiff that that one last, loose cross wouldn't take up some tension from its neighbors?

This is precisely my concern, that the looseness in the last cross will eventually be distrituted over all the other crosses, thus lowering their tensions (but perhaps even if it were to do this, it is being distributed over so many strings or, more precisely, so much string that the effect is minimal - I think we need an expert here). However, I don't have enough knowledge or expereince to know if this really happens over time. From using my string meter, and from what I've learned on this board, it is common for the strings in the center of the racquet to be at higher tension than those towards the edge of the racquet. If that is true, apparently the tension across the strings does not even out over time. However, logic seems to tell me that they should. After all it is one piece of string all woven through a set of holes.

Mr Harharwood
10-28-2005, 09:18 AM
Maybe if grommets were like pulleys on ball bearings instead of plastic the string tension would even out over the entire string bed but there is too much friction on the grommets for the tension of one string to pass to more than the string next to it. But we are talking about individual string tension which is different the the stringbed tension which is really the most important thing.

LoveThisGame
10-28-2005, 11:07 AM
Tension does not even out over the frame. The strings are going around a bend and coming back the opposite direction. The friction between the string and the frame and the opposite direction of forces are the prime reasons for this.

Ronaldo
10-28-2005, 12:05 PM
Mr. Harhar, maybe if it were a Wilson Roller racquet, eh? Try squaring up the crosses on those racquets.

yourserve
10-28-2005, 12:29 PM
i used to think in theory that the grommets couldn't be holding that
much tension. i thought that all the tension would equal out after
tying off and hitting with the racquet. but the more i have strung
[i am still no expert by any means] if have come to believe that the
grommets hold alot of tension.
next time you break a string slowly cut out the strings. you will find
that there is still quite a bit of tension on a broken string that is still in the
frame.
now the wilson rollers may have a little different effect... i don't care
much to string these frames either.

matchpoint
10-28-2005, 12:30 PM
This is precisely my concern, that the looseness in the last cross will eventually be distrituted over all the other crosses, thus lowering their tensions (but perhaps even if it were to do this, it is being distributed over so many strings or, more precisely, so much string that the effect is minimal - I think we need an expert here). However, I don't have enough knowledge or expereince to know if this really happens over time. From using my string meter, and from what I've learned on this board, it is common for the strings in the center of the racquet to be at higher tension than those towards the edge of the racquet. If that is true, apparently the tension across the strings does not even out over time. However, logic seems to tell me that they should. After all it is one piece of string all woven through a set of holes.

The tension should even out over time, that's why when you do the last string you should increase the tension about 2-3 pounds to compensate to the loss of tension when tying the knot. Also you should insert the awl in the last hole to kind of hold the string while you're tying the knot, be careful to not force it though because you can break the string.

spirit
10-28-2005, 12:55 PM
you should increase the tension about 2-3 pounds to compensate to the loss of tension when tying the knot. Also you should insert the awl in the last hole to kind of hold the string while you're tying the knot, be careful to not force it though because you can break the string.

Thanks matchpoint. Some nice tips.

PBODY99
10-28-2005, 12:57 PM
Please don't use an awl for the tie off. It introduces one more variable into your string job. Along with the increse of 2 to 4 lbs on the tie off string , try to clamp closel to the edge of the frame, the use your pliers to snug up the 1st wrap of your knot gentlly rock it back and forth. When done correctly you wil take out most of the slack that you mentioned.

If you up the tension on the tie off for the short side remember to re-set your tension to what you want the crosses to be.