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dannyjjang
11-02-2005, 05:28 AM
alu power 16 for price of $31(including tax, and labor work) is that the right price?,,,.i told my mother to quickly get me a unique big hitter, but they didnt have it, so the stringer urged my mother into buyin the similar one...this is 13 dollar in TW adding 17 for labor job??isn't that too much

nViATi
11-02-2005, 05:30 AM
alu power 16 for price of $31(including tax, and labor work) is that the right price?,,,.i told my mother to quickly get me a unique big hitter, but they didnt have it, so the stringer urged my mother into buyin the similar one...this is 13 dollar in TW adding 17 for labor job??isn't that too much
If you want cheaper, buy a stringer and do it yourself.

TopSpinTennis
11-02-2005, 05:46 AM
Yeah, that's the best thing to do. Get a reel and a stringer and they'll pay for themselves in the long run.

Jerry Seinfeld
11-02-2005, 06:03 AM
IMO $17.00 for a professional string job is not too much. If the stringer is very good you will get a consistent, high-quality string job each time. Your racquet will be inspected and will receive proper care. I'd rather pay the money for a quality job on well maintained/professional equipment than have second rate work that is not easily replicated. If you are not stringing for yourself it is best to pay the money for a job done properly and professionally.

Cruzer
11-02-2005, 09:27 AM
alu power 16 for price of $31(including tax, and labor work) is that the right price?,,,.i told my mother to quickly get me a unique big hitter, but they didnt have it, so the stringer urged my mother into buyin the similar one...this is 13 dollar in TW adding 17 for labor job??isn't that too much

The $17.00 stringing service charge you paid is a comparative bargain compared to the stringing prices outlined in the "Business Models" thread in the Stringing Machines section. As that thread demonstrates stringers will charge what the market will bear and apparently there are lots of players that will pay ridiculous prices to have their tennis racquets strung. Considering that stringing a tennis racquet is not much more complicated than mowing the lawn it often seems the charges just for stringing are exhorbitant. That is way the gear heads who frequent these boards who know that fact buy their own stringers and do their own racquets.

doriancito
11-02-2005, 09:39 AM
i am impressed on how much the stringnig service costs in the US here only the Stringing sevice is very cheap its is 15bs devide by 8,10 to get it in dollars....ho what the heck 15bs is 1 dollar 85 cents, for stringing service!!! really cheap!

Jerry Seinfeld
11-02-2005, 09:48 AM
The actual act of stringing is admittedly not all that difficult to learn. But a professional job with consistent results time after time after time requires advanced skills and refined technique. A professional stringer brings these skills and understands the nuances of the job.

Most people who visit these boards can also play tennis. They can hit forehands, backhands, volleys, serves etc., as can the pros. BUT the pros hit the ball at an entirely different level. Both are playing tennis, but the levels are not the same.

This is also true with stringing. There are professionals and then there are the 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0 etcetera equivalents. When deciding upon your stringer you need to determine if you want a professional quality job or if you can live with the 4.0 version? The choice will always be there to make. Just realize there is a difference and then determine for yourself if it is worth it to you to experience the difference.

jj300
11-02-2005, 09:51 AM
I doubt the stringer got the string for less than $13.75 like you could at TW. So $13.75 plus $5 shipping is $18.75. So the stringing fee is $12.25 including tax. If you ask me thats pretty darn good considering that the person has to maintain inventory, keep their lights on, purchase a machine (EXPENSIVE), and tools, and put bread on the table! I agree with Jerry on this one. I have see way too many misweaves, cracked rackets, and rackets that have been shortened because of improper stringing. Keep in mind that im not a pro stringer but I would rather pay one $13 than risk having my sometimes $200 racket broken. I do string for others for a small fee but refused to touch any rackets until I strung mine about 100 times and measured them to make sure they are no misshaped or cracked or have any misweaves etc.

LoveThisGame
11-02-2005, 10:04 AM
Good comments, Jerry and jj300. There are skills (stringing, tennis, business) and professionalism. Heck, having someone mow your fairly small lawn in this area costs at least $30 every time. Stringing takes more than McDonalds' skills.

jj300, thanks for pointing out the costs for macine, shipping and inventorying which many overlook. Your time learning to string WELL and CONSISTENTLY on YOUR frames is an initial and ongoing effort which needs reward.

Cruzer
11-02-2005, 10:14 AM
I doubt the stringer got the string for less than $13.75 like you could at TW. So $13.75 plus $5 shipping is $18.75.

1. Why is it doubtful that the stringer paid less than the TW price for string. If you buy strings direct from manufactuers or wholesalers it is very likely the stringer paid less than the TW retail price.

2. Shipping cost of $5.00 per set assumes they order their strings one set at a time. Not realistic

So the stringing fee is $12.25 including tax. If you ask me thats pretty darn good considering that the person has to maintain inventory, keep their lights on, purchase a machine (EXPENSIVE), and tools, and put bread on the table! I agree with Jerry on this one.

No one is going to become the next Bill Gates stringing tennis racquets. The reality is stringing tennis racquets for the non-professional player is a low margin business unless you develop a list of customers that naively will pay whatever they are charged. A stringer could be stringing racquets on a $135.00 Klippermate so assuming that all stringers have expensive stringing machines is not correct.

The actual act of stringing is admittedly not all that difficult to learn. But a professional job with consistent results time after time after time requires advanced skills and refined technique. A professional stringer brings these skills and understands the nuances of the job.

I guess it depends on what your definition of advanced skills is. The technique used to string a tennis racquet is completely transparent to the end user. All they want are strings in their racquet. The technique used to properly install them is irrelevant to them. I have not met one tennis player from a 2.5 player to a club pro that frets over the technique used to string their racquet

Return_Ace
11-02-2005, 10:26 AM
meh, thats not bad danny, over here in the UK its 30 POUNDS (i.e £30) to get BB Alu strung.......... its costs me £20 for the string itself and £10 for stringing, and at current exchange rate that $17 to string......... so the labour cost is the same between me n you, but you get the string a whole lot cheaper.

jj300
11-02-2005, 10:34 AM
Many people that I have asked and many people wrote on the GSS boards
(grand slam stringers) that they can not get luxilon cheaper even if they buy 1000 sets from the distributor. Keep in mind that many of the people on those boards have their own shops or are tour stringers and definetly have access straight to the factory.

Jerry Seinfeld
11-02-2005, 10:37 AM
Technique leads to consistency. Consistency, my friend, is the most important element as well as the most illusive. Consistency and quality are easily recognized by beginners as well as the more advanced. Everyone wants a consistent string job that feels right, whether they realize it or not.

Inconsistent stringing, i.e. just throwing them in, impacts the playability of the racquet from stringing to stringing. A string job that the player is not accustomed to can feel different, sometimes uncomfortable. Sort of like wearing shoes that are a half size to a full size too large or small. Just doesn't feel right. All I am trying to illustrate is that there is a value in paying for a professional to install your strings. All string jobs are not created equal.

Jack the Hack
11-03-2005, 10:08 AM
When evaluating the quality and professionalism of a stringer, here are some questions you should ponder:

1.) Did the stringer take time to ask questions about your game and what you were looking for in a string?

2.) Were they knowledgable about different strings and tensions, and offer helpful suggestions for increasing durability or playability?

3.) Did they inspect the old string job for hints of future problems before cutting them out?

4.) Did they take the time to properly clean and inspect the racquet for damage prior to stringing (and let you know about potential problems)?

5.) Did they replace or repair damaged grommets, or use tubing in areas where grommets were old?

6.) Do they use a machine that supports the frame adequately and creates a consistant tension?

7.) Did they properly mount the racquet so that it was protected from damage? (One size does not fit all.)

8.) Did they use the correct string pattern for the racquet?

9.) Did they properly weave the strings?

10.) Did they make sure to avoid notching the string when pulling, or damaging it with an awl (if used)?

11.) Did they pull the right tension? (Were they aware of the properties of different strings that would effect tension and adjust?)

12.) When finished, did they inspect the string job for quality issues (and recognize/rectify problems before presenting the racquet to you)?

13.) Did they throw in any extras, like a free overgrip?

14.) Did they stencil the racquet (if you requested this)?

15.) Do they properly stand behind their work if there is a problem?

16.) Are they certified by a stringing organization (like the USRSA) and do they continue to seek enhanced training in their craft?

Attention to detail makes the difference between the lazy/inexperienced/bad stringer and the expert professional. If you are getting true expert professional service, $15-$20 is not a bad price for labor... it's a bargain!

(The person who owned the local tennis store where I grew up was a consumate professional, had the USRSA “Master” certification, and used to spend a couple weeks every year stringing at the US Open. I learned a lot from him and from being a USRSA member myself when I was in college. I have my own stringing machine and string my own racquets, but do not sell my services because I don’t think I am prepared to handle various types of racquets, repair grommets, or make replacements if I cause damage. However, I don’t think a lot of amateurs are aware of these types of issues or are prepared to handle them.)

hummer23
11-03-2005, 12:01 PM
One shop ina nearby racquetclub strings up alu for 37$, and recently they were going to raise teh rates to 41$. So 31 is a good deal comparitivly.

bcaz
11-03-2005, 10:23 PM
Jerry speaks the truth. I have my own machine and I don't string enough racquets often enough to get real good. But I have a good machine and I use good string and I am careful and take my time to produce a nice, consistent string job. I could string for other players and give them results that are either way better or not quite as good as a commercial stringer, some of whom are extremely competent while others are aren't very good. But I'm slow, so I couldn't make a decent living stringing racquets. I'd have to charge you more than you are willing to pay. You'd be better off going to a good tennis shop. BTW, I do like my own string jobs, but every once in a while I produce less than great work, like if I'm tired, or if I stretched the string too much, or (been a long time) I missed a weave, or the tension was a bit off, or slightly inconsistent across the string bed, or I may have done a crummy knot, or god forbid kinked the gut or overlapped the string outside the frame ... are you getting the picture?

dannyjjang
11-07-2005, 09:30 PM
When evaluating the quality and professionalism of a stringer, here are some questions you should ponder:

1.) Did the stringer take time to ask questions about your game and what you were looking for in a string?

2.) Were they knowledgable about different strings and tensions, and offer helpful suggestions for increasing durability or playability?

3.) Did they inspect the old string job for hints of future problems before cutting them out?

4.) Did they take the time to properly clean and inspect the racquet for damage prior to stringing (and let you know about potential problems)?

5.) Did they replace or repair damaged grommets, or use tubing in areas where grommets were old?

6.) Do they use a machine that supports the frame adequately and creates a consistant tension?

7.) Did they properly mount the racquet so that it was protected from damage? (One size does not fit all.)

8.) Did they use the correct string pattern for the racquet?

9.) Did they properly weave the strings?

10.) Did they make sure to avoid notching the string when pulling, or damaging it with an awl (if used)?

11.) Did they pull the right tension? (Were they aware of the properties of different strings that would effect tension and adjust?)

12.) When finished, did they inspect the string job for quality issues (and recognize/rectify problems before presenting the racquet to you)?

13.) Did they throw in any extras, like a free overgrip?

14.) Did they stencil the racquet (if you requested this)?

15.) Do they properly stand behind their work if there is a problem?

16.) Are they certified by a stringing organization (like the USRSA) and do they continue to seek enhanced training in their craft?

Attention to detail makes the difference between the lazy/inexperienced/bad stringer and the expert professional. If you are getting true expert professional service, $15-$20 is not a bad price for labor... it's a bargain!

(The person who owned the local tennis store where I grew up was a consumate professional, had the USRSA “Master” certification, and used to spend a couple weeks every year stringing at the US Open. I learned a lot from him and from being a USRSA member myself when I was in college. I have my own stringing machine and string my own racquets, but do not sell my services because I don’t think I am prepared to handle various types of racquets, repair grommets, or make replacements if I cause damage. However, I don’t think a lot of amateurs are aware of these types of issues or are prepared to handle them.)

no..no free overgrip....this guy sells benminton racquets and tennis racquets, and some how can string both of em. He did ask try this string that string, but everytime i went their he urged me to try different string everytime, one thing i noticed is the day i visisted to get my racquet, i saw about 10racquets waiting to be strung, and 20 done. So my guessimate is, his good, if his not there won't be 30 racquets there done or waiting to be done. i do not know what stencil is..and he does not finish he tells his customers to visit later or the next day. Uno mas question....What about Big Sporting sales store? such as Big 5, Sportschalet they string racquets//:mrgreen:

nViATi
11-07-2005, 09:35 PM
no..no free overgrip....this guy sells benminton racquets and tennis racquets, and some how can string both of em. He did ask try this string that string, but everytime i went their he urged me to try different string everytime, one thing i noticed is the day i visisted to get my racquet, i saw about 10racquets waiting to be strung, and 20 done. So my guessimate is, his good, if his not there won't be 30 racquets there done or waiting to be done. i do not know what stencil is..and he does not finish he tells his customers to visit later or the next day. Uno mas question....What about Big Sporting sales store? such as Big 5, Sportschalet they string racquets//:mrgreen:
Sporting stores SUCK for stringing racquets.

Steve Huff
11-08-2005, 04:55 AM
It used to be: double the cost of the string + add $10 for the total cost. A lot of clubs and shops still adhere to that rule. Big box stores often charge less than half that in labor, and often, you don't know who strings it, how many he/she has done (if any), and the skill of machine that is used. A good stringer will be able to recommend strings when you need one different than what you use, and in general, treats you like you're the most important customer he has. Kind of like Sports Authority---yeah, right.

SteveI
11-08-2005, 05:25 AM
Sporting stores SUCK for stringing racquets.

Could not have said that more CLEARLY myself. Makes me cry to watch one of those guys string a frame.

Regards,
Steve

TheRed
11-08-2005, 06:27 AM
Sporting stores SUCK for stringing racquets.

I disagree. I managed the department of major chain and my stringer was superb. I would've taken my racquet to him over a tennis shop that might have hired a teenager who is likely a good player but not necessarily a good stringer. Combined, we probably had 30 years of stringing experience. I do agree that generally, sporting goods stores don't string as well but if you know of a good stringer at one of these places, request that he/she string your racquets and you'll end up with a solid stringing job at a cheaper rate.

dannyjjang
11-08-2005, 08:27 AM
and how come they dont sell uniqie big hitter...can i just order the string and request the stringer to string my racquet? how much will he charge for labor

scotus
11-08-2005, 08:58 AM
I take my own string to the tennis shop and pay only $10 for labor. So even though I have my own drop-weight machine, I prefer to have it done.

The shop has a nice constant-pull electronic machine, so whoever does the job does a pretty good job.

I am extremely slow when it comes to stringing, so it can easily take me 2 hours to finish a job, and my 2 hours are worth a whole lot more than $10.

Cruzer
11-08-2005, 09:49 AM
I disagree. I managed the department of major chain and my stringer was superb. I would've taken my racquet to him over a tennis shop that might have hired a teenager who is likely a good player but not necessarily a good stringer. Combined, we probably had 30 years of stringing experience. I do agree that generally, sporting goods stores don't string as well but if you know of a good stringer at one of these places, request that he/she string your racquets and you'll end up with a solid stringing job at a cheaper rate.

I agree it is unfair to categorize all sporting stores as being poor at stringing racquets. There are probably quite a few very good stringers working at big sporting stores however they are likely few and far between.

dannyjjang
11-10-2005, 08:31 AM
only $10 are u sure?...for stringing own strings