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View Full Version : Is it possible to avoid racquet frame deforming?


chapufo1
11-04-2005, 11:21 PM
Hi, I just recently strung 2 racquets for the first time on a gamma-x2 and I am 100% sure that the head and tail mounting points were as tight as they could be . However, when I strung the first racquet (old, have been used for 7 months), I saw a difference in terms of length and an width compared to my brand new racquet (this racquet was longer and less wider). This made me wonder if I made a mistake in stringing or if it was this shape because of previous string jobs done on it. However, when I strung the second racquet and then compared the frame sizes to the first one that was strung, it was the same size.....I have no idea how the hell this is happening nad I just wanted to know if it is natural to have a little deformity in the racquet. thx

dancraig
11-05-2005, 12:07 AM
__________

SteveI
11-05-2005, 02:14 AM
Hi, I just recently strung 2 racquets for the first time on a gamma-x2 and I am 100% sure that the head and tail mounting points were as tight as they could be . However, when I strung the first racquet (old, have been used for 7 months), I saw a difference in terms of length and an width compared to my brand new racquet (this racquet was longer and less wider). This made me wonder if I made a mistake in stringing or if it was this shape because of previous string jobs done on it. However, when I strung the second racquet and then compared the frame sizes to the first one that was strung, it was the same size.....I have no idea how the hell this is happening nad I just wanted to know if it is natural to have a little deformity in the racquet. thx

Hi,

Which frame?

Regards,
Steve

jbs24
11-05-2005, 07:12 AM
It may depend on the stringing machine or the stringing technique. 2 vs. 6 point mounting can make a difference in the resulting racket shape since the 6-point mount absorbs more of the stress in the racket. The racket should deform some, but any more than 1/2" difference or so betweeen rackets may be reason for concern.

Stringing technique may come into play. Are mains and crosses done at the same tensions? do you string left side of mains then right, or alternate? From your description it sounds like the crosses are tighter than the mains in the previous racket. Maybe bumping down the tension on the crosses by a few pounds would help. Did the previous stringer do this?

chapufo1
11-05-2005, 09:13 AM
I'm definitely tensioning mains and crosses with the same tension, but the wierd thing is I hear creaking noises when I do crosses but not mains. Also, I do the left mains first, then the right mains then to crosses right away.

nViATi
11-05-2005, 09:19 AM
I'm definitely tensioning mains and crosses with the same tension, but the wierd thing is I hear creaking noises when I do crosses but not mains. Also, I do the left mains first, then the right mains then to crosses right away.
That's the problem. Do the mains alternating between left and right side.

SageOfDeath
11-05-2005, 09:51 AM
Yes you should alternate

chapufo1
11-05-2005, 10:29 AM
wait, mains are the ones that go vertically and the crosses are the ones that go horizontally right?

SageOfDeath
11-05-2005, 10:57 AM
yes, with the mains you should alternate, its the ones that go vertically.

Do a left main, then a right main, and repeat till all your mains are strung.

chapufo1
11-05-2005, 12:26 PM
with a 2 point mounting system (gamma x-2) is it possible to avoid all deformation? I mean, there's always some error in whatever you do, so I'm just wondering if maybe a little bit of deforming is a problem. thx.

Steve Huff
11-05-2005, 04:00 PM
Yes, you will get some deformation. A little doesn't hurt, but 1/2" is quite a bit in my opinion. Machines that have really stiff mounting arms keep deformation to a minimum (ie. most Babolat stringers, Pro Cord machines, etc.).

To alternate mains, tension the first main on one side (say 1L), then 1,2 R, then 2,3 L, then 3,4 R and so on until they are done. Stringing all of 1 side, then the other---I'm surprised your racket is still intact.

chapufo1
11-05-2005, 07:38 PM
I think I did it right this time. It seems like the racquet deformed vertically about 1-2 mm and I can't see the difference in the width. Is this much deformation normal?

nViATi
11-05-2005, 08:20 PM
I think I did it right this time. It seems like the racquet deformed vertically about 1-2 mm and I can't see the difference in the width. Is this much deformation normal?
1-2mm is almost nothing. That should be fine.

chapufo1
11-05-2005, 10:20 PM
are older racquets more prone to deformation?

SteveI
11-06-2005, 01:09 AM
are older racquets more prone to deformation?


Hi,

I found just the reverse was true for me. The older frames seem to have much better overall construction and deform less in general.

Regards,
Steve

jbs24
11-06-2005, 09:05 AM
I would think it's a toss-up whether or not an older racquet would deform more. Companies are always pushing the limits, trying to make lighter racquets, but using stiffer materials. Therefore, I would guess that racquet stiffnesses haven't changed much over the years (unless you're talking about a woodie), but head weight has.

And Chapufo, I would restring that racquet correctly. Stringing one side of mains first puts a twisting stress on the head. A squash racquet would crack overnight or after a few games, but tennis racquets are a bit beefier, so You may not have any lasting damage.

chapufo1
11-06-2005, 09:44 AM
thx alot for the advice. I already cut out hte strings and restrung it, it seems like theres about 2-3 mm difference from before so it's ok i think. Also, by older racquets I mean racquets that have been used for about 6 months as opposed to a brand new one.

doriancito
11-06-2005, 10:57 AM
my brother has a this junior radical HEAD racquets and sometimes when he string them the head frame goes ROUND! like not oval but very round and the coaches cut the strings