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View Full Version : How Do I Become A Stringer?


Matthew
11-05-2005, 01:21 PM
So, say you love tennis. But you aren't good enough to be a professional on tour, nor a coach...

What about a professional stringer! I was just wonder, what does it take to be working for a stringing company or being traveling on tour stringing? How does that all work?

goober
12-08-2005, 05:50 PM
As a side question does anybody know how much pro stringers for ATP and WTA make? Is it a lot more than somebody who has his own proshop with steady business?

dmastous
12-08-2005, 05:57 PM
One good first step would be to get certified by the USRSA.
www.racquettech.com

dmastous
12-08-2005, 05:59 PM
Or it's European equivalant ERSA if that's your home.

precision response
01-28-2006, 09:13 PM
Also intrigued.


Bump.

Steve Huff
01-28-2006, 09:51 PM
Learn to string quickly and accurately. Every racket you string should be done the same (as far as how you mount the racket in the stringer etc. Get your MRT from RacquetTECH. String lots of rackets, visit forums like this and GSS. String at local tournaments etc. Usually, a company will bid on the rights to string at a company, then the company will contract work to stringers to come string for them. From what I've read, you work your butt off, and don't get paid much hourly, because you have to work so hard.

Matthew
01-28-2006, 10:02 PM
From what I've read, you work your butt off, and don't get paid much hourly, because you have to work so hard.

Yeah I'll bet. Thanks for the info though.

I am just looking for other ways to be involved in professional tennis, without actually being a player on the tour.

tedmeister
01-28-2006, 10:30 PM
As a side question does anybody know how much pro stringers for ATP and WTA make? Is it a lot more than somebody who has his own proshop with steady business?
Actually, you end up making more money when you get back to your own proshop because you can charge maximum for your services and folks still bring in their frames for stringing and custom work knowing that you actually did work for these big tournaments/players. Pictures on the wall taken with big name players really boost confidence. That is, until one of your apprentices does a misweave or a crossover when your are not there.:mrgreen:

Gaines Hillix
01-29-2006, 07:53 AM
The companies that have the contract for the stringing at pro events get about $25 per frame for labor. Many of the players provide their own strings. As I understand it, the stringer gets about $10 per frame. However, these guys/gals aren't employees of the company, they're sub-contracting their services. In most cases, they have to pay their own way to the tournaments. Not sure about lodging and meals. Anyway, I've heard that sometimes the stringers themselves only break even. For tournaments in foreign countries there are other considersations like visas and work permits. I've heard of stringers arriving in country and being denied entry because they refused to issue them a temporary work permit. And as Steve said it's hard work under a lot of pressure. On the positive side it's the top of the heap, so to speak. There's a lot of prestige involved and it can't hurt if you have your own stringing business.