PDA

View Full Version : Chemicals that change the color on impact?


Tenny
12-10-2005, 01:47 PM
Is there any chemical engineer among us? While reading a thread about 'instant replay...', suddenly I became curious. Is there any chemical that change color (for like 20 sec, green to red or black for example) on impact? I am imagining,

a 2 inch width tape that contains that kind of chemical. We can put this tape outside of lines (baseline, service line etc. For the centerline, on either side of the line). When the ball hit this tape, the color will change from the color of the court surface to something noticeable to players, officials and spectators for enough time (But not too long to prevent confusion) before it changes back to the original color. It will wear out of course due to playing but should be cheap enough to be replaced often. And we wouldn't need expensive highspeed cameras or computers. What do you think??

Any business partner?

:D Tenny

vkartikv
12-10-2005, 07:59 PM
My bachelors degree is Chem Engg. but I have moved to Environmental now, but nevertheless, there are paper strips that are intended to change colour upon contact with certain chemicals. To answer your question about changing from red to green, how about a traffic signal light? :)

fishuuuuu
12-10-2005, 08:13 PM
I think it would be more practical to have the tennis balls coated with a chemical and the lines coated with one as well. When the chemical on the ball hits the line then the chemicals react causing a color change on the ball. Balls are replaced fairly quickly so I think it's a viable option.

nViATi
12-10-2005, 08:25 PM
I think it would be more practical to have the tennis balls coated with a chemical and the lines coated with one as well. When the chemical on the ball hits the line then the chemicals react causing a color change on the ball. Balls are replaced fairly quickly so I think it's a viable option.
What if spin causes some of the chemical to fly off and hit the sideline? I don't think that would be a very reliable system.

fishuuuuu
12-10-2005, 08:31 PM
Not a powder chemical, more like a liquid that dries on application.

VGP
12-10-2005, 10:14 PM
Then you'd have that stuff all over your hands.

As for the tape on the court, the color change would happen if you stepped on it too.

fishuuuuu
12-10-2005, 10:16 PM
Not necessarily, the chemicals are transparent until contact.

And for a tape, it would not change if you stepped on it, rather if your shoe had the chemical on it and stepped on it, it would. But how many players step on the balls?

AngeloDS
12-10-2005, 10:57 PM
There's a lot of ways to achieve this, but a lot of problems arise. You would have to have two chemicals seperated by a semi-permeable membrane, and have electricity running through it so you can do a reaction that goes both ways.

Most likely you'll have to work with acids, which could be dangerous for the players if the tape breaks. Organic acids would be the best, but they create a lot of fumes but are weak acids. Like malonic acid (HOOCCH2COOH).

When it disassociates (breaks into seperate ions), that will allow it to change colors and such. It could simply work with Iodide, Potassium, and other stuff you can get from the shelf.

The hard part would be making the semi-permeable membrane. To withstand the feet, and isolate the chemicals.

Tenny
12-11-2005, 11:03 PM
My bachelors degree is Chem Engg. but I have moved to Environmental now, but nevertheless, there are paper strips that are intended to change colour upon contact with certain chemicals. To answer your question about changing from red to green, how about a traffic signal light? :)

hey vkartikv, how's your GF?

I think we shouldn't modify any current setup. No chemical on the balls. That will mean that chemical on the hands of players, racquets...eventually we will see the color change whenever the racquet hits the ball (racquet and hands).

So, the components should be only the chemical on the court/in the tape and physical energy in the form of ball impact. If there is such a chemical, I'm sure chem engineer can adjust/modify it so that it would work for tennis situation. And they will have to make a strong enough tape.

I am not a big fan of all those instant replay things. Aren't they basically simulation software+calibration process? I like real footage by highspeed camera (Like to see balls become flat when they hit the court surface) but heard that it's expensive.

Hmmm, there is a young graduate who is looking for a job...cannot recall who he/she was.

croatian sensation
12-12-2005, 04:52 AM
OMG what an idea :-)

Newberry
12-12-2005, 05:31 AM
Weird, I was actually thinking along the exact same lines just before I read this thread.
I was thinking of a paint that would change due to impact (or be very light sensitive). Something that would last about 20-30 seconds.
Paint the whole court in it.

How cool would it be to be able to see exactly where every serve bounced, to see your footwork, where you met the ball.. etc...:mrgreen:

sdslyout
12-12-2005, 07:59 AM
The way to do it is to change the entire court surface, acrylic or lucite. The lines are illumunated from under to a soft glow while the rest of the court being a colour, blue or green in the material itself has sensers or in fact is one big senser and is tied or connected to a board set off to the side of the court. the board is a copy of the court and is 'live' or real time. the senser measures presure upon the surface each contact on the court reads out on the board, even footsteps. i guess it would only be good on serves where there is not many footsteps on the court, yet. but thats how it's done. thank you, thank you.

Geezer Guy
12-12-2005, 08:17 AM
Tenny - That's a very creative idea. There are kinks to be worked out for sure, but for thinking outside the box you should get whatever the Tennisia planet's equivilent of the Noble prize.

Newberry - I think that's the best implementation of the idea. I don't know if there's an actual paint-type-product that could do this, or if a new playing surface would need to be built that had sensors wired into it. Maybe a thin wire grid would be layed over the court, and a more-or-less transparent type of paint-stuff painted over the grid to protect it and even things out. The lines would illuminate at the flick of a switch. Flip different switches for singles or doubles. The court could even have a built in scoreboard. After each point you walk to the backcourt and tap your racquet on a spot to indicate who won the point.

Better yet, the surface could keep track of the score - just like bowling where the pins are counted and reset, and the score automatically tallied. The tennis court could indicate which balls are IN or OUT, and keep the score automatically. The players would not need to remember the score, argue about line-calls, or anything. We would just play - like the pro's - and let the linesmen and umpire (in our case - the computerized court surface) keep score.

And the final thing: The tennis balls would have a light-weight metal core. When the surface has determined that a point is over, a magnetized receiver on the back fence would activate, and the balls would bet "sucked" to the back fence. Then, the balls would be fed to the server so the next point could begin. No need for ball-boys.

Geezer Guy
12-12-2005, 08:20 AM
sdslyout - good job. That's where I was going too. You're just a faster typer, I guess.

Geezer Guy
12-12-2005, 08:21 AM
Oh Yeah - The sensors could monitor Foot Faults also!

sdslyout
12-12-2005, 11:31 AM
The wiring would have to be ' encased ' within the surface material. the material can not be so dense as to not allow a sensor to spread out and make contact with the closest other sensor. they should overlap for complete coverage of the court. encasing the hard wiring would protect the wire and the sensor(s) from the weather, water.....fluids. While the court is 'on' all is recorded and stored in a database and can be replayed if needed. also encasing everything would make a much flatter, even playing surface. footsteps would look like footprints and a ball would make a 'round' image on the board or readout. an electro-magnet would be bad for people on the court because of the radiation. but i like the idea of the different lines, singles/doubles at the flick of a switch, good one !

it's not thinking out of the box. it's thinking square peg , round hole.

Tenny
12-13-2005, 09:45 AM
Tenny - That's a very creative idea. There are kinks to be worked out for sure, but for thinking outside the box you should get whatever the Tennisia planet's equivilent of the Noble prize.

Newberry - I think that's the best implementation of the idea. I don't know if there's an actual paint-type-product that could do this, or if a new playing surface would need to be built that had sensors wired into it. Maybe a thin wire grid would be layed over the court, and a more-or-less transparent type of paint-stuff painted over the grid to protect it and even things out. The lines would illuminate at the flick of a switch. Flip different switches for singles or doubles. The court could even have a built in scoreboard. After each point you walk to the backcourt and tap your racquet on a spot to indicate who won the point.

Better yet, the surface could keep track of the score - just like bowling where the pins are counted and reset, and the score automatically tallied. The tennis court could indicate which balls are IN or OUT, and keep the score automatically. The players would not need to remember the score, argue about line-calls, or anything. We would just play - like the pro's - and let the linesmen and umpire (in our case - the computerized court surface) keep score.

And the final thing: The tennis balls would have a light-weight metal core. When the surface has determined that a point is over, a magnetized receiver on the back fence would activate, and the balls would bet "sucked" to the back fence. Then, the balls would be fed to the server so the next point could begin. No need for ball-boys.


Hahaha, great! Now the SMARTCOURT is born! If I were a tournament official, I would try it right away (except Madrid). If I were a US open official, I would start with a USopen annual highlight video first though:( .

racingdad23
12-13-2005, 09:50 PM
How about a slightly elevated acrylic/tranparent surace with cameras underneath along the baselines. From underneath it would be quite obvious if contact was made with a line since there would be no ball to block the view as there is from overhead. Then right after the match they could turn down the lights and turn on the colored flashing lights underneath the floor and disco all night. Call it the BeeJees Open.