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View Full Version : The best weapon against crafty slice is....?


tennisbody
02-19-2004, 10:30 AM
I wonder what is the best weapon against slicers... Is it a topspin , flat shot , moonball or maybe a loopy topspin. How to create offensive ball from slice return or slice ball. I find myself having difficulty with good wide angled slice...Any ideas...?

Thanks, :roll:

Hawaii 5.0
02-19-2004, 11:31 AM
In general you are supposed to slice a slice, but most often people topspin a slice and try and get offensive early.Generally when people slice it's becuase they are on the defense and it usually takes more than one or two shots to regain the offensive,so by at least not giving a sitter you can keep them back.Unless the slice is offensive then its tough.I'd slice it back unless you are confident in your ability to change the spin of the ball as well as the direction since by changing the direction of the ball they will be even more on the move.

Plawan
02-19-2004, 11:47 AM
Slice back deep and selectively approach with either slice or mild topspin. The best answer to a slice shot is to hit the ball before it hit the ground because it's floating and slower than topspin. A slice passing shot is easy to finish with volley becuase it rised up above the net or it can float out under the pressure.

tennisbody
02-19-2004, 12:16 PM
Thanks , I'll try to slice it back as an approach shot and then to volley to the open court.. But here comes my next quastion - When you have been pulled out wide with slice is it safe to slice back down the line...( over high part of the net plus direction change ...) ?

@wright
02-19-2004, 12:28 PM
I am wondering this too as I have been playing a guy better than me who can basically hit outright winners with his slice. It stays so low I feel like I'm playing in super gravity. I won the first set off him the last time we played, but the next two sets were all him slicing it low and I would try and blast a topspin forehand and either miss it or my reply would be too weak. His fitness isn't so great, so I think next time i'll just focus on running him from side to side and maybe a drop shot here and there. I didn't try to vary my gameplan nearly enough. His passing shots are superb too. Oh well, guess I just answered my own quesiton!

jayserinos99
02-19-2004, 01:54 PM
^^ it depends on your situation. typically you would want to go crosscourt to give yourself time and position; basically percentage tennis. problem with that is your opponent, knowing that you're out of position, will sneak in behind it. if that happens, you don't necessarily have to go for the line, but make your opponent play one more shot by slicing it a bit closer to the net so your opponent has to volley it one more time.

Eric Matuszewski
02-19-2004, 05:34 PM
Creating the perfect strategy to beat the slicer or any other type of player for that matter will just get you playing a game that is not your own and make you lose faster. Just adjust your mechanics to handle the lower bounce and play your same game.

When dealling with a slicer (person who hits slice) keep in mind the ball will bounce 2 to 3 feet lower than a topspin ball. This is because the ball is impacting the court at a shallower angle thus it rebounds at a shallower angle. The ball will also leave the court with much less speed than the topspin or flat ball, thus it will tend to die in front of you.

Make these 2 mechanical adjustments to deal with the slicer.
1. Take the ball earlier, this means get closer to the bounce because the ball will not come to you (you must go get the ball).
2. Get your butt down. Go into a deep lunge position before trying to strike each slice ball.

Hyperstate
02-19-2004, 05:53 PM
Methinks Eric has got it right. You gotta bend yer knees and get to the slices early to achieve good replies. My mate hits these irritating low bouncing slices and I either slice back deep (cross court) and approach the net, or if I have the time, run round the slice, adjust my forehand (more racquet head speed), and hit to either his backhand or forehand, depending on whichever gets him out of position, wrong foots him, blah blah :wink:

polakosaur
02-19-2004, 06:34 PM
keep it low and deep with whatever shot you want, this forces the opponent to hit a slice up to clear the net and keep it deep, you anticipate the shot get ready knowing it will be at a height for groundstroke and set yourself up with an approach to and easy volley

Eric Matuszewski
02-19-2004, 07:27 PM
Tennisbody, I teach at Princeton Racket Club (New Jersey) I can teach you in an hour how to distroy every annoying slicer you'll ever meet. Club phone is 732-329-6200. Leave your # with the receptionist.

tennisbody
02-20-2004, 08:57 AM
Thanks to all of you and special thanks to Eric for tel.# and contact.

borisboris
02-20-2004, 10:05 AM
:lol: Hey Eric - how about a few keystrokes of advice for someone playing a regional legond slicer this weekend - Seattle - Can't afford to go to NJ. Come on be a patriot.

tennisbody
02-22-2004, 07:18 PM
Just get back from tennis lesson with Eric. I must say it was well spend time and money. Eric gives me a few invaluable tips how to fix my problem and improve my game based on my individual style. I highly recommend Eric to anyone in New Jersey Princeton area who's looking for good, no nonsense advice.

tennisdad
02-23-2004, 07:54 AM
Had one of these matches the other night - the guy ONLY hit slices from both sides. After a 1st set fighting him (and mostly me) on it from the baseline and him winning that one easily, I just got more aggressive and, especially in the 3rd set, pushed him back and came to the net every opportunity and took the match - it worked. BTW, I'm switching to the the s/w fh, so this match was not good for me, but hey gotta adapt. It seems like the s/w doesn't lend itself that well to those low, biting balls (at least at my level).

@wright
02-23-2004, 08:28 AM
SW forehand should work well for low balls compared to a western forehand. Compared to an Eastern you will probably have a more difficult time hitting low balls.

Eric Matuszewski
02-23-2004, 05:52 PM
Dear Boris, hope my posting is not too late to help. My students keep me very busy and I know I'm making my girlfriend crazy so I'm gonna try to keep posts shorter.

Assuming you read my earlier post you realize I don't recommend trying to change your game. Check your mechanics with that post.

I know alot of you guys like to think patterns so here's a simple one for you.

Try to short angle topspin the slicer.

A vulnerability of the slicer is that he can't pull the ball down quickly over the net. This takes topspin. His shots will tend to stay in the air longer (a function of underspin) thus when he gets something short off the side of the court (that he has to run forward and to the side on especially) it will be much harder for him to hit a passing shot. (I realize cross court approaching is a traditional no-no but it can work with the slicer). Give him more room on the down the line (He'll have to change direction on the ball on the run, get it over the highest part of the net and dip it down quickly, which he can't do without topspin). Try not to laugh when he starts pulling his hair out, just keep a straight face, keep good mechanics (see earlier post). Best Wishes

Petekbladetour1
11-03-2008, 01:16 PM
Slice it or hit massive topspin.

kelz
11-03-2008, 11:50 PM
Slice it back, or plenty of top.

oest10
11-04-2008, 01:24 AM
If the slice is good enough, topspin will be very difficult. Hit a flat, hard ball with margin, deep to the forehand, regain confidence in your rally and next time, give the slicer more topspin to try and work with. He'll probably fail or hit it too high.

TommyGNR
11-04-2008, 01:00 PM
Here is a couple:
1) Come up to net. Slice shots dont dip(like topspin) and are the eaisiest spin to volley.
2) Switch to a continental or eastern grip. Its easier to hit a low ball with them.
I understand that Eric is a teaching pro(which I am not), but I am not so hot on his suggestion. Its exactly the type of shot (short with room down the line) that chip and charger wants to see.

JSE
11-04-2008, 01:20 PM
Holy thread revivals! Almost 5 years after the last post. Well done!

Bungalo Bill
11-04-2008, 02:14 PM
Yes, it is old but still worth answering. My answer would be patience, being able to move the ball around, your ability to recognize the short ball...and a good topspin shot.

dman72
11-05-2008, 04:57 AM
Had one of these matches the other night - the guy ONLY hit slices from both sides. After a 1st set fighting him (and mostly me) on it from the baseline and him winning that one easily, I just got more aggressive and, especially in the 3rd set, pushed him back and came to the net every opportunity and took the match - it worked. BTW, I'm switching to the the s/w fh, so this match was not good for me, but hey gotta adapt. It seems like the s/w doesn't lend itself that well to those low, biting balls (at least at my level).

I've recently switched from a S/w to more Western forehand, and I am getting absolutely killed by slice now, wheras it never used to bother me much. I hate having to switch grips (I tried that in my loss last night and the ball went 10 feet out because I didn't change my swing path). Brushing up under a ball that bounces less than 2 feet off the ground with a western grip is not easy.

mordecai
11-05-2008, 07:38 AM
The best weapon against a good slicer is strong balance footwork and court positioning. If you can keep your balance while you get on top of the slice you should be able to really use your racquet face to rip that ball up over the net. I love it when an opponent feeds me a short-angle slice-- I'll almost always approach on it and typically win the point by forcing an error or getting an easy put-away.

Rickson
11-05-2008, 07:56 AM
You can slice a slice if you plan on hitting it short or you can semi-moonball it with an open face if it's a low skidding slice. I used the semi-moon, open face shot against someone who slices everything from both wings. I triple bageled him so I'd say it works.

Djokovicfan4life
11-05-2008, 09:11 AM
Try coming into net, and make him pass you with his slices. If he can do this consistently using slices, then I don't know what to tell you.

Steady Eddy
11-05-2008, 09:26 AM
Yes, it is old but still worth answering. My answer would be patience, being able to move the ball around, your ability to recognize the short ball...and a good topspin shot.
Mine's pretty close to this. I'd just add, think, "watch the ball, watch the ball, watch the ball." because it is so likely to take a funny bounce. Also, if because of the funny bounce you're not in position to hit a hard shot, settle for pushing it back, it's better than making an error. Slicers depend on you to give them the point, they won't hit many winners, so take that away from them, and they can't hurt you.

To people who say, 'come to the net'. Yeah, that's good if they always slice, but nine times out of ten they'll do something different when you come to the net. Probably a deadly lob that lands 6 inches inside the baseline. You're gonna need your overhead the day you play a slicer!

LafayetteHitter
11-05-2008, 10:13 AM
This was a good thread. I'm glad to see the discussion continuing.

Bungalo Bill
11-05-2008, 11:57 AM
Mine's pretty close to this. I'd just add, think, "watch the ball, watch the ball, watch the ball." because it is so likely to take a funny bounce. Also, if because of the funny bounce you're not in position to hit a hard shot, settle for pushing it back, it's better than making an error. Slicers depend on you to give them the point, they won't hit many winners, so take that away from them, and they can't hurt you.

To people who say, 'come to the net'. Yeah, that's good if they always slice, but nine times out of ten they'll do something different when you come to the net. Probably a deadly lob that lands 6 inches inside the baseline. You're gonna need your overhead the day you play a slicer!

Yes, many players who have trouble beating a slicer fail to understand all the opportunities that come there way to beat them.

If you are playing a slicer think about your slice. How do you have to hit one? Is it easy to control all the time? What happens when you hit it? Does it always land in the same spot? Do you at times leave it short?

When a slice is short, players are so used to playing back for topspin, that they fail to recognize the slice, calculate where the bounce will be, and move nearly simultaeneously forward to be in a spot they have a better chance to control the ball.

Footwork tactics with a slicer should be the following:

1. HIT: Before your opponent hits the ball you should be moving toward the baseline instead of staying three feet behind it. Many times you should split-step when you are ON the baseline or even slightly in front of it as the slicer hits his ball. Why? Well, first you are in a better position to cut-off those crafty angles and second if the slicer leaves the ball short, you got a head start to come in and take command of the point.

2. BOUNCE: If you immediately recognize that the ball will land reasonably deep, move back a bit to a comfortable spot that you use for your current level. Once you hit the ball, move back in. You want to be reasonably close to the sliced ball so you can get in good position whether it is short or long. Further, this puts pressure on the slicer to hit a better shot. Inevitably, the slicer will error by floating it long, giving you a duck ball to hit, or leaving it short. Slicing takes an awful lot of skill to be very consistent on where the ball bounces. So, take advantage of it!!!

3. HIT: You should be in a good position to hit the ball if your footwork is moving you close to the baseline and using the baseline vs. three feet back as your reference on how you move.

So in essence, move to the baseline after your shot. Move your reference up on where you will defend you court. In other words, for topspin you will play a bit behind the baseline, for underspin you move up a foot or two. This puts pressure on the slicer through your positioning and dares him to hit a perfect ball all the time. It is much easier to control topspin than underspin.

If he hits you a short ball, recognize it immediately, move in, and take control.