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View Full Version : best route to go in college?


randomname
12-15-2005, 07:41 PM
well, right now I'm a senior in high school and am having a hard time deciding what i want to do with my major so i figured i might ask for some advice from some people who have been there. anyway, right now my passions are psychology, politics (international politics to be more specific) and law. but really more than anything I want a job were I feel like im actually helping people. Now, as greedy as it sounds, I really want to be in a career where i can be making around $100k at some point in my life, as perfect as a lawyer seems for me, I'm kinda worried that I'm going to become one of the sleazy whimpy corporate lawyers you see in movies (sorry to any actual lawyers, thats just the mental image I have). anybody have any suggestions for a career path I should look in to? I'd prefer it to fit the $100k and helping people first, if its in a field im interested in thats just gravy.

Phil
12-15-2005, 08:12 PM
well, right now I'm a senior in high school and am having a hard time deciding what i want to do with my major so i figured i might ask for some advice from some people who have been there. anyway, right now my passions are psychology, politics (international politics to be more specific) and law. but really more than anything I want a job were I feel like im actually helping people. Now, as greedy as it sounds, I really want to be in a career where i can be making around $100k at some point in my life, as perfect as a lawyer seems for me, I'm kinda worried that I'm going to become one of the sleazy whimpy corporate lawyers you see in movies (sorry to any actual lawyers, thats just the mental image I have). anybody have any suggestions for a career path I should look in to? I'd prefer it to fit the $100k and helping people first, if its in a field im interested in thats just gravy.

Gee, Junior. Why not President of the United States. You know, THAT job pays about 300 BIG ONES, PLUS, free room and board AND transportation. Plus, you get to help A real LOT of people-that is, if you want to...295 million of your fellow citizens PLUS all those folks in the poor countries, or those countries needing a bit of American-style FREEDOM! Thank about it...you as POTUS...makes sense. You're already sounding like one. Go for it, Junior.

tykrum
12-15-2005, 08:13 PM
The one thing that I will say on this subject, since I am just 21 and haven't ever had a career job, is that if you do something you enjoy, it's not really a job. That's how I feel about coaching high school tennis and teaching tennis lessons, and that's the mentality that I have with my major.

atatu
12-15-2005, 09:25 PM
Well, medicine seems to be the obvious answer, but if you're not really passionate about it, that won't work, because you have to be pretty dedicated to make it through med school. One thing about having a law degree, it does give a lot of options....and I don't recommend the corporate law route, it's miserable and not worth the money....

Steve Huff
12-15-2005, 10:16 PM
My best advice is what I've done and seen. First, I got a business/marketing degree. It got me into sales, then accounting (basically filing at a big oil company) making about 25/yr. Not good. I decided to go back into nursing school (my wife was already a nurse). I went to San Juan College in Farmington, NM, which I still consider one of the finest AD programs out there. You generally work 3 12-hr days or nights (7-7 shift). I worked nights because a) they pay you more, some places a lot more, b) the people who work nights are more laid back, but still smart, c) you don't have to put up with as many doctors writing and changing orders. If you do your job, you can usually get the patient through the night. If you all have that as a matter of pride, you may even save a few people's lives, maybe a lot of those too. If you're not lazy, men do very well in nursing. There's a lot of physical work, plus, you are the minority in this setting. What you do gets noticed--good or bad. A lot of guys end up in the ER, ICU's etc. Great pay, lot's of time off, and a job in just about any town in the US (or out of US) that you want to go to. Starting pay---depends where you live.

snowpuppy
12-16-2005, 07:15 AM
If you have a dream, you should just fullfill it. Because you don't want to be stuck doing something that you don't want to do just because of the pay check. I have heard from people i know that the big pay check will only bring you happiness for a short time and sooner or later the job will feel like a drag. If you just want to be finacially secure while doing just what you want to do, then pick up one of those retirement books or something that will teach you how to make money on the side to secure your fincial future. Something like "rich dad, poor dad" maybe a good start to what I am talking about.

Geezer Guy
12-16-2005, 07:53 AM
If you don't know now what you want to do, that's not such a big deal. Usually, everyone takes mostly the same classes the first two years of college anyway, despite the major. The classes get more career-specific after that, so eventually you WILL have to decide. It's best to find a career field that you're interested in. Once you've decided on the general career field, then you can narrow it down to the specific branch that offers the "rewards" (pay scale, time off, humanitarien aid, etc) you want.

And, if you're thinking about doing the above, you might consider going to a 2-year school first for your basics - then transfering to a 4-year school that specializes in your career field after you graduate.

max
12-16-2005, 06:17 PM
I was in your shoes. Made the BAD MISTAKE in going to a liberal arts school. While people will tell you how much they love or respect the liberal arts, the actual people on the ground doing the hiring DO NOT have this perspective: they want to fill Slot X with a Slot X Major. Go to a big university and major in the field you plan to work in. Do not major in the liberal arts. Minor in them, though. (Of course they're the most intellectually valuable and important things in our culture.) You're worried about corporate law? Well, one of the brightest guys I went to school with, the guy who was most against going Establishment, ended up in corporate law. A waste. Another guy I went to school with WANTED to be a corporate lawyer; he did four years before he found a way out of that rat house: he hated it, the hours, the people, the work. Loved the money. Now he teaches law. Try medicine: there's very much a place for a guy with a liberal arts attitude who wnts to be a doctor: much more beneficial to patients than a typical chemistry major.

arky-tennis
12-16-2005, 06:24 PM
I would go after a Liberal Arts college. They offer what you are intrested in I think. Have you considered a college professor or something on those lines?

Hartzy
12-16-2005, 06:28 PM
Most large schools offer a degree called "international studies" in which you can specify what you would like to do. A lot of those people end up doing things like teaching americans who are sent over seas how to interact with a certain culture. They get paid quite well too.

I wanted to do that or be linguistic anthropologist. Then I fell in love with Manhattan and I applied as an international business/Russian major for when I head off to school.

Shoutout to my fellow senior;)

MackSamuelHustovisics
12-16-2005, 07:38 PM
well, right now I'm a senior in high school and am having a hard time deciding what i want to do with my major so i figured i might ask for some advice from some people who have been there. anyway, right now my passions are psychology, politics (international politics to be more specific) and law. but really more than anything I want a job were I feel like im actually helping people. Now, as greedy as it sounds, I really want to be in a career where i can be making around $100k at some point in my life, as perfect as a lawyer seems for me, I'm kinda worried that I'm going to become one of the sleazy whimpy corporate lawyers you see in movies (sorry to any actual lawyers, thats just the mental image I have). anybody have any suggestions for a career path I should look in to? I'd prefer it to fit the $100k and helping people first, if its in a field im interested in thats just gravy.

Well it is a good thing that you actually are putting a lot of thought into your plans for the future. A lot of people your age don't think much at all or think only in short terms and they're all about the money. Happiness is important, as it's a good fuel one can use to carry on with their life, providing a reason to continue living. Don't stress out. Things become clearer when you free yourself from worries, fear, frustration, anger and anxiety.

croatian sensation
12-17-2005, 05:54 AM
I read all this and see how you have too much opportunities in the States :-) The dream job you're talking about is SF. Can you really earn that much having a psycology/ politics degree and help people at the same time?
Most college degrees you're mentioning here aren't even translatable into Croatian...cause they don't exist here :-)
Less opportunities...easier choice :-)

Anyway...I can't help you with deciding ( I chose my major when I was like 13 and haven't changed my mind since- and I'm 20 now and glad to say I made the right choice) but I can tell you this...if you figure after a year that you've made a mistake don't be afraid to change it and start over..I've seen too many people from my high school that have figured after 2 yrs of law school that they've made the wrong choice but didn't have the courage to drop it.

Newberry
12-17-2005, 08:58 AM
As a CAD teacher and sometime career counselor, you are welcome to login to our career site and take the "career matchmaker" test. It might give you some insight.
go to www.careercruising.com
login: dickenson
pw: clinchco

tennis-n-sc
12-17-2005, 09:00 AM
The vast majority of high school graduates are so filled with idealism and immaturity that making a decision as far reaching as a career is not possible. That is why most college graduates fall into careers they would never have imagined when they began college. As 60ish as it sounds, I would recommend a stint in the military or peace corp (yes, it is still around). You would be helping other people, your country, and gaining the maturity to make a decision on your future based on your own personal experiences. Plus, it looks great on your resume. If you are in it for the money, set your sites far higher than 100K. If you are into it for helping other people, forget the money.

Docalex007
12-17-2005, 09:17 AM
I agree strongly with tennis-n-sc. We all know parents, friends, teachers, etc are all pushing you to go to college and get it done. I like to think that's not alwalys the best thing to do. As tennis-n-sc has said, right after high school you do not have any real life experience. You barely know what independence from your parents is all about. Taking a year and doing something like international volunteering or some internship abroad will allow you to fully develop your interests. Taking that time will allow you to see how the world really works, which will only help you in deciding what career field you want to go into and study at the University.

I'm saying that partly because that's what i'm doing now. I have already received an Associates in Science degree so I can transfer at any time to a 4-year University. However, I decided to come back here to Germany and do some stuff here, then head to China for five months early next year. You can believe I will have learned way more valuable life skills along the way doing this than those guys who merely went straight from high school to college.

Sure, they get the degree before you do....but whats the hurry, if your motivated you'll get your degree no matter what. And being a year or two older than the other guys in your class isn't that big of a deal either. You'll be the one who's experienced what its like out there!

Hope that helps!

Hartzy
12-17-2005, 02:56 PM
Docalex may I IM you sometime? I'm moving to NRW next year and I have lots of questions.

Docalex007
12-18-2005, 06:39 AM
Docalex may I IM you sometime? I'm moving to NRW next year and I have lots of questions.

Sure, no problem.

MegacedU
12-18-2005, 12:56 PM
Considered sports management? Believe it or not, there's a lot of law involved with that and good money too. You really wouldn't be helping too many people, but hey, at least it's an interesting field.

tykrum
12-18-2005, 01:11 PM
Considered sports management? Believe it or not, there's a lot of law involved with that and good money too. You really wouldn't be helping too many people, but hey, at least it's an interesting field.

Hey that IS my major. And it isn't just sports, it can be anything, facility management, event management, agency if you go to law school, or marketing etc. Whatever I do with it going to be a lot of fun, and then I coach and teach lessons (which is where helping others comes in for this thread starter). But right out of college there generally isn't great money in sport (certainly not 100K). Unless of course you get into agency, or event management and you are really good at it.

One career where people make 100K coming right out of school is pharmacy. Try that out for a career that doesn't have as much stress or school as law or medicine.

dmastous
12-18-2005, 01:45 PM
I know quite a few people with Liberal Arts degrees (English Lit, Humanities, etc...) who are working as waiters, and salepeople. If you want a job a Liberal Arts degree is not going to help you much.

max
12-19-2005, 08:26 AM
I think Tennis-n-SC has something there with the idea of taking two years in the military or volunteer service. Gets your head out and about, away from your folks, get to breathe the air and see a bit how things work. AND it DOES distinguish your resume a bit! You get a sense of how people got to where they're at, what they had to do. About law: it's NOT a ubiquitous degree. I'm in business, and businessmen only want lawyers for legal matters, for business matters, its an MBA. We know that lawyers LOOK for problems in a deal or situation, while business people try to SOLVE them. (I say this having turned down acceptance to a major law school because lawyers and judges I spoke with were not especially satisfied with law and thought I could be more constructive doing something else: only one person LIKED law.) There are LOTS of lawyers, and contrary to TV and popular opinioin, quite a few make under $40K a year. (You see the Bright Star and not the handful of small guys.) Collegiality is obviously declining, lawyers pay counselors for advice on how to get out of law, etc. Medicine continues to be the most likely route to good money in the US, and even if there's health care reform, they're likely to continue making good money.

bluegrasser
12-19-2005, 08:48 AM
Hey I'm 51 and I still don't know what I want to be when I grow up.