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Steve Huff
12-15-2005, 10:19 PM
What is the saddest, most tear-jerking thing you've ever done? Tell us a story. I worked in a hospital as an RN, so I can tell some real tearjerkers.

sdslyout
12-15-2005, 10:24 PM
I had to bury my kitty, 8 years. every time i drove up in the drive way he was always there to greet me. Always happy to see me. I'll miss you my furry friend,
" sniff " ..........

Deuce
12-16-2005, 01:22 AM
Have my 18 year old cat die in my arms. I was 24, and he had been a daily part of my life since I was 6.

(He wasn't given a toxic drug by a vet to purposely end his life, he died naturally.)

Klippy
12-16-2005, 07:09 AM
Have my 18 year old cat die in my arms. I was 24, and he had been a daily part of my life since I was 6.

(He wasn't given a toxic drug by a vet to purposely end his life, he died naturally.)

:(

He lived a long life.

Klippy
12-16-2005, 07:10 AM
I had to bury my kitty, 8 years. every time i drove up in the drive way he was always there to greet me. Always happy to see me. I'll miss you my furry friend,
" sniff " ..........

No more! I might cry...:(

DJ Edwards
12-16-2005, 08:20 AM
Tearjerker? How about this?

I was walking one Saturday night in Brussels, down a fairly busy street near the Hotel Opera, (defonce a n'en pouvoir plus) when I noticed a fairly young homeless guy walk out of one the epiceries. For a guy in his situation, he looked remarkably happy and this no doubt due to the fact that he was holding a big, cold bottle of Heineken he had just purchased at the store.
So dude has this big smile on his face and spring in his step as he reaches into his pocket to take out a lighter and pop open the bottlecap. Fascinated I watch as Mr. Happy discards the brown paper bag, reaches over with his lighter and then feels the bottle start to slip because of the condensation on the outside of it. Dude's eye's bulge out and his expression immediately changes to one of pure desperation. He tries to regain his grip like his life depends on it. He acts quicker than anyone I've ever seen in my life. JUGGLE ONCE, ALMOST GOT IT, JUGGLE TWICE, NOT QUITE, THRICE, FOUR AND OHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!! PUTAIN! BORDEL D'ENCULE DE DIEU!!!!! ENFOIRE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The bottle drops on the cobblestone street and shatters into a million pieces. Dude calls out in agony the above words which need no translation and may even offend you if you can read street French. Dude kicks the outside of a building and then starts yelling out non-sensical jibberish. No doubt a good half hour of begging had gone to waste, washed down the street in a puddle of fermented Dutch life blood. Immediate gratification is gone. His night is wrecked. No escape, back to the harsh reality of homelessness...

As a true fanantic of the tagadatic and non-drinker, I start laughing hysterically, falling on the ground even.
At which point he notices me and becomes extremely angry. It's not his fault for what happened, it's mine for witnessing the drama. All his rage is channeled towards me. A fire lights in his eyes and I swear the man means to kill me for mocking his plight. He charges at me full force, intenting to kick me in the face European footballer style. I got no time to react, only a second to brace myself for impact

(hold on, time to read big book to my kindergarten students, more later if it be the will of the boarders)

Sunshine3000
12-16-2005, 08:55 AM
I had to bury my kitty, 8 years. every time i drove up in the drive way he was always there to greet me. Always happy to see me. I'll miss you my furry friend,
" sniff " ..........

sdslyout, don't tell me you ran over the cat, did you? :shock:

sdslyout
12-16-2005, 10:18 AM
No i did not, he was smart enough to stay away from cars and to stay out of the street(s) . He was my 17 lb. black manx ( no tail) kitty. I watched him come out of his mother, the mama cat is 13 years old and i still have her ( she owns me, i don't own her) Every night he slept right next to us, he loved water he would chase the water coming from the hose in the front yard, like a dog does. Whatever i would be doing he was there to 'help' he never 'talked' to strangers he was well mannered. He loved to go for rides in the car with me. All i would need to do is stand outside and call his name once and he came running, everytime ! I took off to visit a friend for a few minutes and i guess while i was away the next door neighbors were chasing him around and chased him into the street and he got hit. I get home and the first thing i notice driving into the driveway is no kitty and next door there standing around, all drunk and not saying much, i go into the house and a couple of minutes later a knock on the door. It's next doors girlfriend and she says she has some bad news for me. Tells me MIDNITE got hit by a car in the street and takes me to where he is. and i pick him up and he was gone. Next door wouldn't look, or talk to me for a week so i think something else is up. I corner one of them one day and i force him to tell me what they did or what happened. I made it clear that if they were trying to catch my cat (all drunk) and ended up chasing him into the street and the reason he was in the street was because of them I was going to hurt each of them, BAD. So i got the truth out of him and they did chase him into the street. At that very second he never knew what hit him and as he's spiting up teeth he says he's sorry. I tell him what were you thinking. You'll never catch him sober but to chase him drunk so i hit him again and he says 'stop' and i say shut up you mother farmer you killed my cat and then i waited for his brother to come home. he got the same treatment. To this day they stay far away from me and don't look at me or anything. once the older brother started to talk some crap to me from a distance and i said "what " and started to walk over to him saying " you want more you stupid mexican " well he turned pale and ran into the house and would not come out to say whatever it was he thought he wanted to say they know i'll mop the floor with them. anyway MIDNITE is burried in the back yard, i made i very nice wooden cross and planted a flower plant over him and everyday i water my kitty. Midnite was a good boy and one-of-a-kind. The sad part is BOBBI his mama knows he's gone too. she's depressed and doesn't eat and just sits there looking at me and is always looking around for him, calling out for him, she knows. Nothing is forever, except love. IMO

legolas
12-16-2005, 10:28 AM
having my friend die in my arms on fight with other people

Kaptain Karl
12-16-2005, 10:35 AM
My dad was dying from two inoperable brain tumors 4.5 years ago. The parts of his brain which were affected made his memory and his reasoning ability suffer. (As if he had "instant Alzheimer's.")

He was one of the toughest strongest people you'd ever meet. A very determined man. He was determined to "beat" this cancer ... but his affected brain did not realize how he was losing the battle.

Mom chose to do hospice in-home. (In case you don't know it, "hospice" is for dying as gracefully and painlessly as possible; it is the choice for some families when they arrive at the realization, "He's dying. We can't fix it.")

Anyway, I went back to Mom's to help with Dad for a time. During that time, it became clear Mom could not lift and manipulate Dad's body like I could. Neither could the Hospice Nurse, who was there three hours each day.

My last "duty" before leaving was to explain to Dad that he had to go to Hospice at the Hospital. It was *then* that his mind realized WE had given up on his recovery; that we had resigned ourselves to his coming death.

(He was correct. We had accepted his ultimate end. But for him, the discussion / realization / acceptance and decision to move him to the professional facility ... was all happening at that moment. He did not remember the dozens of conversations which had preceded that talk....)

Seeing the tears course down his face as the Attendants wheeled him out of his house -- for what we all knew was the last time he'd pass through that doorway -- that was the saddest moment of my life.

- KK

Slazenger
12-16-2005, 02:41 PM
There's nothing sadder than...


SUICIDAL BUNNIES (http://hannes.domainplanet.at/fusi/BunnySuicide/Bunny%20suicides.html)

Tenny
12-16-2005, 03:04 PM
My dad was dying from two inoperable brain tumors 4.5 years ago. - KK

KK, I don't know what to say.

This year, many good things happened to my direct family and myself but around my family, it was like an assult of cancers. 3 friends of my dad, 2 of our relatives (one being only 43), and 3 of relatives had near-cancer experiences (turned out to be something else, but still...). I am not religious but hope there is an after-life we can all meet again...

Aykhan Mammadov
12-16-2005, 03:19 PM
All my life is complete sadness, I rarely laugh and feel myself happy.

Aykhan Mammadov
12-16-2005, 03:23 PM
KK, yr sadness is close to me, I also buried my father 5 years ago. That day was sad, but period after without him was even more sad. Only 2 persons I loved in my life last years - my papa who died, and my 5 years old son.

ChicagoJack
12-16-2005, 04:18 PM
All my life is complete sadness, I rarely laugh and feel myself happy.

Your post is breaking my heart Aykhan. As best I can remember, [searching parts of my brain that contain oddities like how to do long division] Azerbaijan has quite a complicated past. I do have very crude understanding of your country's history. Over run by mongols in the 4th century, acquired by Russia from Persia by treaties in the 1800's. Then there is the the shake out after the bolshevik revolution, early 1900s. Then used as base for communist rebels in iranian azerbaijan. I seem to recall also big conflict with Armenia in the 90s? Seems like recently your country just seems to pushed and pulled by Iran and Russia? Forgive me if my crude understanding of your country and your city on the caspian is innacurate, I mean no offense.

Losing your son and father must be very tough to deal with. I am not a religious man, but I will pray for you, and send you my warmest wishes.

-Jack

Hartzy
12-16-2005, 04:23 PM
I never knew my dad's side of the family until a few years ago when it was explained to me how my dad was brought up. So the saddest thing I have did was have my dad explain the circumstances of why I only know my mom's side.

His mom was a seamstress that opened a shippage of clothe and inhaled a mold that killed her months later. My dad and my aunt were sent to live with aunts and uncles and then his stepmom who worked him to the bone. His dad became an alcoholic to deal with my grandmother dying and he was never around. Then my dad's closest cousin was murdered randomly by a guy having an episode with drugs and depression after returning from Vietnam. Then my grandfather got tired of his second wife being so controlling so he left the house and ended up having a very long affair. During this time, half of my dad's extended family converted to Jehova's Witness and banished the other half. Then 2 of my dad's uncles that he still knew ended up dying of AIDs in the 80s and his one uncle that is still alive, is very bad alcoholic.

I gained so much respect for my father when I realized that he actually raised normal children under those circumstances.

Slazenger
12-16-2005, 04:48 PM
Have any of you listened to 'King of sorrow' by Sade?

Newberry
12-16-2005, 08:46 PM
One of the saddest things I've done recently was a very simple act. My 8 year old son has a friend I'll call "Joshua". Joshua is our neighbors son. 6 years old and a very active. He had not been eating well for several days and I came home one day to find my wife in tears, with the news that Joshua had been diagnosed with Burkitts Lymphoma, and had a cancerous tumor in stomach. This is a very rare & terrible disease.
He was rushed by helicopter to St. Judes with the possibility of never returning home.
The next day on my way home from work, I noticed his small bicycle sitting in the rain on their sidewalk. I stopped and just stared at it for a few moments, considering how I had seen Joshua riding along happily just 2 days before, and this was the very spot he had left his little bike. His parents had left direclty from the hospital, and hadn't even been home.
I slowly pushed it out of the rain, under their carport, wondering if I would ever see him riding it again... of what it would be like to learn such an awful truth about my own son.
It really hit me hard.
Joshua is still in the hospital, fighting for his life...

PM_
12-16-2005, 09:01 PM
One of the saddest things I've done recently was a very simple act. My 8 year old son has a friend I'll call "Joshua". Joshua is our neighbors son. 6 years old and a very active. He had not been eating well for several days and I came home one day to find my wife in tears, with the news that Joshua had been diagnosed with Burkitts Lymphoma, and had a cancerous tumor in stomach. This is a very rare & terrible disease.
He was rushed by helicopter to St. Judes with the possibility of never returning home.
The next day on my way home from work, I noticed his small bicycle sitting in the rain on their sidewalk. I stopped and just stared at it for a few moments, considering how I had seen Joshua riding along happily just 2 days before, and this was the very spot he had left his little bike. His parents had left direclty from the hospital, and hadn't even been home.
I slowly pushed it out of the rain, under their carport, wondering if I would ever see him riding it again... of what it would be like to learn such an awful truth about my own son.
It really hit me hard.
Joshua is still in the hospital, fighting for his life...

That's extremely unfortunate. I'll say a prayer for him tonight...

Aykhan Mammadov
12-17-2005, 04:34 AM
Your post is breaking my heart Aykhan. As best I can remember, [searching parts of my brain that contain oddities like how to do long division] Azerbaijan has quite a complicated past. I do have very crude understanding of your country's history. Over run by mongols in the 4th century, acquired by Russia from Persia by treaties in the 1800's. Then there is the the shake out after the bolshevik revolution, early 1900s. Then used as base for communist rebels in iranian azerbaijan. I seem to recall also big conflict with Armenia in the 90s? Seems like recently your country just seems to pushed and pulled by Iran and Russia? Forgive me if my crude understanding of your country and your city on the caspian is innacurate, I mean no offense.

Losing your son and father must be very tough to deal with. I am not a religious man, but I will pray for you, and send you my warmest wishes.

-Jack



NOOOOOOOOOOOOO, my son is alive. My dad died 5 years old. U didn't understand me correctly. I told I loved my father and I love my son.

Clayplay
12-17-2005, 06:37 AM
Have any of you listened to 'King of sorrow' by Sade?
do you listen to Sade the singer? my dad always listens to her. i've never heard "King of sorrow" but, i've heard of "frankie's first affair" and "sally";)

Clayplay
12-17-2005, 06:47 AM
having my friend die in my arms on fight with other people
OMG!! i never knew a fight could lead to death!! did the other people get finned or sent to jail ?

croatian sensation
12-17-2005, 10:20 AM
Gosh people...if the saddest thing you've ever done i.e happened to you was the death of your cat then you must be very lucky

Kobble
12-17-2005, 01:41 PM
What saddens me? The fact that we treat criminals better than animals. When was the last time you heard of an attempted head transplant on murderers, or knocking-out their immune system for study. Outside of human rights, the only problem I see with it is the handling, housing and transportation of inmates. Inmates are apparently much harder to keep in their cage than a mouse. However, from a moral and scientific point of view there is no substitute.

FedererUberAlles
12-17-2005, 04:25 PM
Man kind is the saddest thing I've ever seen.

Viper
12-17-2005, 06:07 PM
I told one of my friends to **** off, and he died the next day.


*Update*
4/20/10

WTF! Never ever happened.

Clayplay
12-18-2005, 03:48 AM
So sad :( :( :(

go_nadal
12-18-2005, 04:38 AM
I told one of my friends to **** off, and he died the next day.
thats so bad man... i m so sorry for u.

jeebeesus
12-18-2005, 04:41 AM
I told one of my friends to **** off, and he died the next day.

it`s not fair,i told a lot of my friends that and they are still living.

armand
07-12-2006, 10:07 PM
One of the saddest things I've done recently was a very simple act. My 8 year old son has a friend I'll call "Joshua". Joshua is our neighbors son. 6 years old and a very active. He had not been eating well for several days and I came home one day to find my wife in tears, with the news that Joshua had been diagnosed with Burkitts Lymphoma, and had a cancerous tumor in stomach. This is a very rare & terrible disease.
He was rushed by helicopter to St. Judes with the possibility of never returning home.
The next day on my way home from work, I noticed his small bicycle sitting in the rain on their sidewalk. I stopped and just stared at it for a few moments, considering how I had seen Joshua riding along happily just 2 days before, and this was the very spot he had left his little bike. His parents had left direclty from the hospital, and hadn't even been home.
I slowly pushed it out of the rain, under their carport, wondering if I would ever see him riding it again... of what it would be like to learn such an awful truth about my own son.
It really hit me hard.
Joshua is still in the hospital, fighting for his life...Did Joshua make it?

Frodo Baggins
07-12-2006, 10:20 PM
The Saddest thing I've ever done> is Putting Down my best friend Laura(Who's a Cat).:( Thats the most hardest thing I've ever had to do!!!:( I'll miss her soooo Much!!! (Crosation) You don't really get it>You've never really loved an animal soo much till there gone.. Sure I use to think the same But now that I've experianced it personaly I think differently now.. >(I regret it now even though laura was 24 in cat years.) Now I have this void where somthings missing in my life. Plus I also lost my dad from cancer.

tonysk83
07-12-2006, 10:23 PM
Reading There are No Children Here, book definitely has changed my life. Made me change majors from Biomedical Engineering to Social Work.

malakas
07-12-2006, 10:30 PM
I am very lucky.The saddest thing that has happened to me,or rather the thing that affected me the most,was when I went with my professor and other students to a lab and saw some very small baby-pigs and he killed one for us to study it!:(
And one other day..it was very sad..but in the uni we have "adopted" some dogs and I had become close with one of them and about 2 months later..I go to the anatomy lab ..and I see his corpse!!I almost threw up.:neutral:

Frodo Baggins
07-12-2006, 10:36 PM
I know How you feel sani>I'm a lover of animals also. And will always be one forever!!!(Hates Seeing anything weather person or animal killed).

Kabob190
07-12-2006, 10:37 PM
Gosh people...if the saddest thing you've ever done i.e happened to you was the death of your cat then you must be very lucky

pets can become very close, even like a member of your immediate family. especially if you've had that cat for 18 yrs. thats not very lucky.

for me its when my cat went missing. my parents found some of its fur in the backyard and they thought that a larger animal killed it but they didnt tell me this for several months after, all this time i thought that it had run away. ive heard stories about cats going away for months and returning home so i still kept some hope. but i was devastated when they told me this. i only had it for about 4 yrs but i was still very close to that cat

sportsfan92
07-12-2006, 10:56 PM
Reading There are No Children Here, book definitely has changed my life. Made me change majors from Biomedical Engineering to Social Work.

Amazing Book. I shudder when I think of what so many children and people have to endure. Thank you tonysk83 for making a difference.

sportsfan92
07-12-2006, 11:03 PM
Saddest thing I've ever done...driven cross country from TX after 9/11 to pick up my sister and her kids and then drive up the east coast to go to the funeral of their grandparents who were on flight 77 that crashed into the Pentagon. I remember my sister being so strong for her children and her husband....so when she came downstairs from tucking in her 7 year old son and had tears streaming down her face, I knew something had finally hit her. When she had gone upstairs to tuck him in on the pallette made for him on the floor - she found him asleep in the middle of all the photos he'd taken off the shelves of his grandparents. I still cry today for the pain of a little boy losing his innocence in the loss of his grandparent's murder. He used to go spend all summer with his grandparents on their farm. He learned to drive a tractor and lawnmower and other farm equipment and work hard and love the outdoors. That was his heaven on earth. I get tears in my eyes just thinking of the pain that still resides in this little man... and hearing the sobs of a boy last year on the anniversary of 9/11 b/c he misses them so much. And the helplessness of not knowing how to make it better.....

malakas
07-12-2006, 11:14 PM
Wow ..Marcie..I almost teared reading your post.:(
I hope with time and lot of love your nephew will heal his wounds..:)
With Crazy aunt's help!!;)

katastrof
07-12-2006, 11:17 PM
My dad was dying from two inoperable brain tumors 4.5 years ago. The parts of his brain which were affected made his memory and his reasoning ability suffer. (As if he had "instant Alzheimer's.")

He was one of the toughest strongest people you'd ever meet. A very determined man. He was determined to "beat" this cancer ... but his affected brain did not realize how he was losing the battle.

Mom chose to do hospice in-home. (In case you don't know it, "hospice" is for dying as gracefully and painlessly as possible; it is the choice for some families when they arrive at the realization, "He's dying. We can't fix it.")

Anyway, I went back to Mom's to help with Dad for a time. During that time, it became clear Mom could not lift and manipulate Dad's body like I could. Neither could the Hospice Nurse, who was there three hours each day.

My last "duty" before leaving was to explain to Dad that he had to go to Hospice at the Hospital. It was *then* that his mind realized WE had given up on his recovery; that we had resigned ourselves to his coming death.

(He was correct. We had accepted his ultimate end. But for him, the discussion / realization / acceptance and decision to move him to the professional facility ... was all happening at that moment. He did not remember the dozens of conversations which had preceded that talk....)

Seeing the tears course down his face as the Attendants wheeled him out of his house -- for what we all knew was the last time he'd pass through that doorway -- that was the saddest moment of my life.

- KK
I am sorry you went through this KK... it shook me to the bone.

I always thought that the most tragic thing in life is not death, but having to face your own mortality. I am hoping that your father forgot about that moment after being taken to the hospital.

sportsfan92
07-12-2006, 11:52 PM
Steve Huff - thank you for starting this thread. I think in sharing our sorrows (and our joys-such as a love of tennis) we broaden our horizons. In seeing how we all suffer (and rejoice) in many of the same ways or at least over similar things -our perspectives are affected. Maybe we are able to have a little bigger picture of the world and what goes on outside our own lives - which causes compassion to grow in us. Okay - that sounds maybe a little over the top when I go back and read it. But our similarities are greater than our differences, and we should be thankful to be made more aware of that through opportunities such as forums like this.... I just think it is so amazing to be talking to people clear across the continent and the world...

Ok - i will stop babbling now.

sportsfan92
07-12-2006, 11:53 PM
My thoughts will rest on those who have posted their sadness here, as well as their encouragement. And I will say a prayer. Peace...

hgb765
07-13-2006, 02:49 PM
Steve Huff - thank you for starting this thread. I think in sharing our sorrows (and our joys-such as a love of tennis) we broaden our horizons. In seeing how we all suffer (and rejoice) in many of the same ways or at least over similar things -our perspectives are affected. Maybe we are able to have a little bigger picture of the world and what goes on outside our own lives - which causes compassion to grow in us. Okay - that sounds maybe a little over the top when I go back and read it. But our similarities are greater than our differences, and we should be thankful to be made more aware of that through opportunities such as forums like this.... I just think it is so amazing to be talking to people clear across the continent and the world...

Ok - i will stop babbling now.


amen to that
reading this thread has really made me realize how lucky i am to have such a fortunate life. even though its been really sad reading all these posts, its helped me gain more control over myself and just learn to move on from problems. as sportsfan said, our similarities are greater then our differences, so to that one guy who said he hated his life and said he rarely smiles, you need to learn that no ones life is perfect but everyone can try their best to make their life as close to perfect as possible.

wow i sound like a guidance councelor

jonolau
07-13-2006, 09:30 PM
My mom suffered from an aneurysm 15 years ago and lapsed into a coma. I was overseas at that time and rushed back on the first flight I could book. By the time I arrived at the hospital ICU, she was just lying still in bed, kept alive by drugs and machines, unable to move nor open her eyes. But when I whispered to her I was back, she squeezed my hand tightly and started choking as she was trying to say something. We were ushered out by the nurses who had to stabilise her. After that, she lapsed into a full coma for 11 days before being taken off the respirator for the final time on the day before her birthday.

But the saddest moment for me was receiving her body from the hospital mortuary and sitting in the back of the funeral parlour van on the way to embalming with her body covered by a white cloth. I held her arm all the way along the hour long journey and it was the saddest moment in my life.

One moment she was warm and jovial, and not too long later she was cold and still ... but she is definitely resting in peace.

quest01
07-13-2006, 09:49 PM
The saddest part of my life is having no life and going on the computer all day.

Kaptain Karl
07-15-2006, 03:00 PM
I am sorry you went through this KK... it shook me to the bone.Thanks for your kind words.

I always thought that the most tragic thing in life is not death, but having to face your own mortality. I am hoping that your father forgot about that moment after being taken to the hospital.Yes. Dad forgot. (The tumors made it as if he had "instant Alzheimer's.) As long as he was at all aware, he was his regular cheerful self in hospice.

I know I'll see him again. It is a great comfort....

- KK

Docalex007
07-15-2006, 03:49 PM
Saddest thing I've ever done was .......something I won't tell. :)

jonolau
07-15-2006, 07:02 PM
[QUOTE=katastrof]I am sorry you went through this KK... it shook me to the bone.[quote]Thanks for your kind words.

Yes. Dad forgot. (The tumors made it as if he had "instant Alzheimer's.) As long as he was at all aware, he was his regular cheerful self in hospice.

I know I'll see him again. It is a great comfort....

- KK
KK,

Your experience really moved me. I must have been an extremely difficult decision to make, but yet I can imagine that it was the only most viable one after much deliberation ...

Jon

LONGWHITECROSS
07-17-2006, 03:03 AM
my grandfather passed away just hours ago from a chest infection thats effects were multiplied by him having dementia the really sad thing is that i didnt really want 2 go see him in the rest home that he was stayin in before he passed away because i was scared of seeing him in such a bad manner if you know what i mean even though i did end up visiting him that time he was asleep so i never got to say how much i loved and respected him. his death hasnt quite hit me yet well it hadnt really until i thought about writing this.

Kaptain Karl
07-17-2006, 08:13 AM
LONGWHITECROSS, I'm sorry for your loss. Yes, "journaling" your thoughts and feelings in a time like this can be cathartic.

In a short, but helpful book, Good Grief I read that people have categorized 13 (I think.) different ways we grieve. Some folks go through all 13 phases; some only go through 4-6 of them. And hardly anyone goes through the phases in the same order or duration as another. Conclusion: How you grieve is unique to you ... and you're not "broken" if you don't grieve like another.

- KK

sportsfan92
07-17-2006, 06:03 PM
my grandfather passed away just hours ago from a chest infection thats effects were multiplied by him having dementia the really sad thing is that i didnt really want 2 go see him in the rest home that he was stayin in before he passed away because i was scared of seeing him in such a bad manner if you know what i mean even though i did end up visiting him that time he was asleep so i never got to say how much i loved and respected him. his death hasnt quite hit me yet well it hadnt really until i thought about writing this.

hug....

Breaker
07-17-2006, 09:03 PM
My step brother first getting his arm amputated due to a rare form of cancer that originated in his arm, then later finding out that it was spreading through his body having his bedridden for months. I kind of tried to keep it off my mind and go on without thinking of it, he had a room next to me one day in our house and one day I'm playing Halo II on Xbox live and my step mom comes in with this look on her face that somethings not right, my dad leaves and then they call me and I walk into his room to see his unmoving body...needless to say I felt humility as he was the same age as me and I saw him go through the process of being a person like me who normally went through each day in life to dying before my eyes of the cancer. I try to not take anything for granted after seeing that happen.

Also my mom dying a few months after having my little brother of breast cancer. But I try not to feel sorry for myself since others have been through far more than I have. In fact joined a program at my church to help the homeless in the city, not much but it's something at least.

edit: saddest thing I've actually DONE is wasting hours and even sometimes when I'm REALLY bored almost full days on these boards reading 2 year old threads about Federer's shoe size, what type of underwear Nadal wears, etc.

diegaa
07-17-2006, 09:08 PM
My step brother first getting his arm amputated due to a rare form of cancer that originated in his arm, then later finding out that it was spreading through his body having his bedridden for months. I kind of tried to keep it off my mind and go on without thinking of it, he had a room next to me one day in our house and one day I'm playing Halo II on Xbox live and my step mom comes in with this look on her face that somethings not right, my dad leaves and then they call me and I walk into his room to see his unmoving body...needless to say I felt humility as he was the same age as me and I saw him go through the process of being a person like me who normally went through each day in life to dying before my eyes of the cancer. I try to not take anything for granted after seeing that happen.

Also my mom dying a few months after having my little brother of breast cancer. But I try not to feel sorry for myself since others have been through far more than I have. In fact joined a program at my church to help the homeless in the city, not much but it's something at least.

wow man, it sucks. im deeply sorry for your losts. I only may hope good things for you and your family.

jonolau
07-18-2006, 12:03 AM
My step brother first getting his arm amputated due to a rare form of cancer that originated in his arm, then later finding out that it was spreading through his body having his bedridden for months. I kind of tried to keep it off my mind and go on without thinking of it, he had a room next to me one day in our house and one day I'm playing Halo II on Xbox live and my step mom comes in with this look on her face that somethings not right, my dad leaves and then they call me and I walk into his room to see his unmoving body...needless to say I felt humility as he was the same age as me and I saw him go through the process of being a person like me who normally went through each day in life to dying before my eyes of the cancer. I try to not take anything for granted after seeing that happen.

Also my mom dying a few months after having my little brother of breast cancer. But I try not to feel sorry for myself since others have been through far more than I have. In fact joined a program at my church to help the homeless in the city, not much but it's something at least.

edit: saddest thing I've actually DONE is wasting hours and even sometimes when I'm REALLY bored almost full days on these boards reading 2 year old threads about Federer's shoe size, what type of underwear Nadal wears, etc.

Breaker, my feelings are with you.

In reading your posts, I see a lot of maturity and that you are using your talents and blessings to see that you're helping others.

Jon

sportsfan92
07-18-2006, 05:33 AM
Breaker, my feelings are with you.

In reading your posts, I see a lot of maturity and that you are using your talents and blessings to see that you're helping others.

Jon


Yes Breaker - your perception on all your struggles is amazing. Dealing with it and having something positive come from it... that is awesome. Keep the faith.

I do agree- i get quite sad too when I realized how much time is passed in front of the computer.

Live strong buddy! It sounds as if you are quite well on your way to doing that.

serveitup911
07-19-2006, 09:36 PM
The saddest part of my life as been watching my 12 year old cousin die of Lieukemia. She struggled with the cancer since she was about 6 years old. She had a period of a few years that the cancer was in remission. About 2 years ago, the Lieukemia came back full force and she went through just about every possible treatment, fighting so hard. She went through multiple bone marrow transplants from her 9 year old sister and had chemotherapy and radiation treatments. Near the end she could barely walk, and her energy was gone. The toll on her was finally too much, and she died about 6 months ago. Through it all, she never complained and she was very compassionate.

She lived in Pennsylvania, about 600 miles from me. My family went to visit about a month before she died, and we commented to ourselves that she probably only had about a month to live. Unfortunately, I could not go to her funeral because it was a time when finals were coming up at college and our team had lots of important matches. I still regret my decision of not sacrificing and going to her funeral. I'm just glad I got to say goodbye and give her a hug before she died.

Marat Safinator
07-26-2006, 03:00 PM
when my grandfather died in 2001 from cancer, i remember he told me when i was watching the tennis at his house, (wimbledon 2001) it was the 2nd round im sure, he told me goran ivanisevic would win wimbledon. He died not long after goran won.

Marat Safinator
07-26-2006, 03:03 PM
My step brother first getting his arm amputated due to a rare form of cancer that originated in his arm, then later finding out that it was spreading through his body having his bedridden for months. I kind of tried to keep it off my mind and go on without thinking of it, he had a room next to me one day in our house and one day I'm playing Halo II on Xbox live and my step mom comes in with this look on her face that somethings not right, my dad leaves and then they call me and I walk into his room to see his unmoving body...needless to say I felt humility as he was the same age as me and I saw him go through the process of being a person like me who normally went through each day in life to dying before my eyes of the cancer. I try to not take anything for granted after seeing that happen.

Also my mom dying a few months after having my little brother of breast cancer. But I try not to feel sorry for myself since others have been through far more than I have. In fact joined a program at my church to help the homeless in the city, not much but it's something at least.

edit: saddest thing I've actually DONE is wasting hours and even sometimes when I'm REALLY bored almost full days on these boards reading 2 year old threads about Federer's shoe size, what type of underwear Nadal wears, etc.

thats absolutely terrible man.

Freedom
07-26-2006, 06:45 PM
Over the last two summers I've worked at my church camp, washing dishes and cleaning up. It's not a very glamorous job, but it's fun anyway.

This summer, actually, not even two weeks ago as I write this, one of our counselors went on a hike to peak a local mountain. (Our camp is located in a mountain range.) Anyways, he left a note saying when he left, and when he planned on coming back. Well, he didn't come back. Not later that night, not the next day, not even when campers started showing up for the week. We had to call in a counselor who was off-site doing a day-camp, to cover his cabin of kids. The Forest Rangers were contacted (early the morning after he was due back) and they began searching for him. His dad, who was going to run for office in Minnesota, dropped what he was doing, including his campaign, to fly out into the mountains and look for his son. My pastor talked with him, and he told me Jon's (our missing counselor) dad said this at one point:
"I may have lost my life, and I may have lost my son. But I have not lost my faith in God."

Eventually, more organizations were called into the search, much thanks due to Jon's dad and his connections. We had the military scouring the area with infrared and other technologies, and huge groups of volunteers. A lot of the volunteers had amazing stories- one family was just at the mountain for vacation, but a 14-year-old son heard about our missing friend and told his family. They dropped their vacation and went searching. The searchers have done an amazing job, using every tactic, and searching every possible route. We still haven't found Jon yet, but if anyone could still be alive after two weeks in the mountains, my friend sure could. ;)

My prayers are with all you guys.

hgb765
07-26-2006, 07:21 PM
Yes Breaker - your perception on all your struggles is amazing. Dealing with it and having something positive come from it... that is awesome. Keep the faith.

I do agree- i get quite sad too when I realized how much time is passed in front of the computer.

Live strong buddy! It sounds as if you are quite well on your way to doing that.

http://andersdrengen.dk/pics/livestrong.png

at first i wore my livestrong as a fashion trend b/c everyone else seemed to be wearing them, but one day i was sitting around really bored.. and i started thinking about what the words really mean. from then on i've never taken it off. whenever i face a problem in my life, i look at the words and it gives me hope and i tell myself to be strong.

as of now, i still have it on me at all times even though the trend has kinda faded and not many people still wear them anymore..

Breaker
07-26-2006, 07:21 PM
Over the last two summers I've worked at my church camp, washing dishes and cleaning up. It's not a very glamorous job, but it's fun anyway.

This summer, actually, not even two weeks ago as I write this, one of our counselors went on a hike to peak a local mountain. (Our camp is located in a mountain range.) Anyways, he left a note saying when he left, and when he planned on coming back. Well, he didn't come back. Not later that night, not the next day, not even when campers started showing up for the week. We had to call in a counselor who was off-site doing a day-camp, to cover his cabin of kids. The Forest Rangers were contacted (early the morning after he was due back) and they began searching for him. His dad, who was going to run for office in Minnesota, dropped what he was doing, including his campaign, to fly out into the mountains and look for his son. My pastor talked with him, and he told me Jon's (our missing counselor) dad said this at one point:
"I may have lost my life, and I may have lost my son. But I have not lost my faith in God."

Eventually, more organizations were called into the search, much thanks due to Jon's dad and his connections. We had the military scouring the area with infrared and other technologies, and huge groups of volunteers. A lot of the volunteers had amazing stories- one family was just at the mountain for vacation, but a 14-year-old son heard about our missing friend and told his family. They dropped their vacation and went searching. The searchers have done an amazing job, using every tactic, and searching every possible route. We still haven't found Jon yet, but if anyone could still be alive after two weeks in the mountains, my friend sure could. ;)

My prayers are with all you guys.

Wow that must be hard to deal with..I hope Jon is found and my prayers are with you.

Serveitup: Thanks and I feel for you about your cousin :( . It's a tough time dealing with things like that heppening especially to one so young.

Safinator: Must have been tough with the timing and all, at least your grandfather saw his prediction come true, at least he went into death happily, reminds me of the poem "Come Sweet Death" but a family member passing is always dreadful.

Diegga: Thanks and same to you for you and your family :) .

hgb: Yeah I know what you mean, happened to me the same way, it's kind of ironic because I really didn't want one when they were a trend but when they started fading out I started thinking about what they stood for also, I've had at least 10 of those in the last 3 months and don't like taking it off and have gotten weird looks for doing so, but it really does stand for something important real maturity in your decision.