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View Full Version : Hm-m..."well made Yonex"..myth?


Zverev
01-02-2006, 05:30 PM
Have bought MP Tour-5 recently,
it's different in feel from my other frames and it plays good
(if you wanna know how MP5 plays, read mono posts,
they are great)
Anyway, when I have broken the original TW string and attempted stringing the thing,
I was quite puzzled with numerous engineering flaws in it.
Here are a some of them from the top of my head:

1. Weight dicrepancy - arrived 0.7 ounces heavier than TW listed weight

2. Triangular cross section of the head prevents mount wedges of stringing machine to support head, it's then just supported by mount screw at ONE point only, which is not only unhealthy for the frame on its own but also the screw thread scratches the racket body badly when stringing. Rubbish!

3. The distance between 18th and 19th cross at the throat is huge - well over an inch, anyway it's impossible to clamp them together using flying clamp - rubbish engineering!
So I didn't tension the last cross at all - just pulled it through and tied it up - rubbish!

4. If it's not enough for you, the distance between the hole where you are supposed to tie the last cross and the hole where the last main goes, is less that quarter of an inch! - try to make a knot - another rubbish engineering!

So much to all this talk about Yonexes well made - it was worst made racket I come across so far, in regard to stringing, I must admit.
It does play well.

iscottius
01-02-2006, 06:31 PM
Have bought MP Tour-5 recently,
it's different in feel from my other frames and it plays good
(if you wanna know how MP5 plays, read mono posts,
they are great)
Anyway, when I have broken the original TW string and attempted stringing the thing,
I was quite puzzled with numerous engineering flaws in it.
Here are a some of them from the top of my head:

1. Weight dicrepancy - arrived 0.7 ounces heavier than TW listed weight

2. Triangular cross section of the head prevents mount wedges of stringing machine to support head, it's then just supported by mount screw at ONE point only, which is not only unhealthy for the frame on its own but also the screw thread scratches the racket body badly when stringing. Rubbish!

3. The distance between 18th and 19th cross at the throat is huge - well over an inch, anyway it's impossible to clamp them together using flying clamp - rubbish engineering!
So I didn't tension the last cross at all - just pulled it through and tied it up - rubbish!

4. If it's not enough for you, the distance between the hole where you are supposed to tie the last cross and the hole where the last main goes, is less that quarter of an inch! - try to make a knot - another rubbish engineering!

So much to all this talk about Yonexes well made - it was worst made racket I come across so far, in regard to stringing, I must admit.
It does play well.

I played the tour 5 for about a year, and it is a great frame, and the quality is as good as it gets (I currently play Wilson and I find much greater discrepencies than usual)

1. Tennis warehouse is not the manufacturer of this frame, Yonex is they should be responsible for the specs of the frame, not TW (although TW I find is very accurate). It is also common knowledge that with Yonex frames, the weight will increase slightly with the grip size--ie- a 4 3/8ths frame will be lighter than a 4 5/8ths.

2. I have strung these racquets over 25 times and have never encountered a problem securing it in both of my stringing machines. Don't know what kind of machine u are using but I have a drop weight and a lock out.

3. The distance between the 18th & 19th cross being different than other crosses is by design. Alot of racquets are designed this way--ie-Ncode 6.1 95 etc.

4. Is a legitamite complaint, the tie off on the cross strings does not leave ample room, but once the grommet softens and you pull it tight it becomes easier.

The tour 5 is an excellent racquet, well designed and yonex has a great reputation for QC, so don't be worried, enjoy your Tour 5

Iscottius

El Diablo
01-02-2006, 07:31 PM
Archives of this board are full of complaints of breakage in the Yonex 1500 series and more recently the shafts of the V-Con 17 series. Can't think of another company that has had so many breakage complaints here. Yonex paints their sticks nicely but that much breakage leads you to wonder about the engineering that goes into them.

Kevo
01-02-2006, 07:33 PM
I don't think any of those issues are all that big. You will see a lot of things that aren't necessarily perfect in a particular frame, but the point of a frame is how well it plays not how easy it is to string. Many frames have much worse "flaws" when you look at ease of stringing, but those tradeoffs need to be made sometimes to produce a frame that plays in a particular way.

Zverev
01-02-2006, 07:49 PM
2. I have strung these racquets over 25 times and have never encountered a problem securing it in both of my stringing machines. Don't know what kind of machine u are using but I have a drop weight and a lock out.

I am using Klippermate, two point mount, drop weight.
I wish I could draw to explain, otherwise I feel like a dog trying to explain what I mean.
The cross section of MP 5 head is approx an isosceles triangle, so if put one of the equal corners on the mount plate, the mount plate wedge doesn't reach the frame body before mount screw does at the stand out third corner.
The wedge is normally used to spread the tension over the wider area, it's like wether you would hold it with one finger instead of the whole hand.
I am not sure if I am making any sense here, but that's how it is.

3. The distance between the 18th & 19th cross being different than other crosses is by design. Alot of racquets are designed this way--ie-Ncode 6.1 95 etc.

I don't mind that it's different, don't mind that it's bigger, but it's that huge that the mouth of the flying clamp cannot open wide enough to hold them!
Even if you did manage to squeeze them together, there is huge deviation from straight line that after you release them, the tension drops anyway, so the whole process doesn't make any sense. The only way it seems is not to tension the last cross at all, but how would you come up with the design like that?!

4. Is a legitamite complaint, the tie off on the cross strings does not leave ample room, but once the grommet softens and you pull it tight it becomes easier.
Iscottius
I can live with that, but 2 and 3 are bad.
I am dreading another restring...
And thanks for your comments.

iscottius
01-03-2006, 05:22 AM
zverev,
I also used a klippermate with the yonex tour 5, when mounting the racquet, only the center of the base mounts will touch the frame, then screw down tight, It will be secure,

as for the flying clamp, you have to angle the clamp to get both the 18 & 19 crosses in the clamps, it can be done and will also get easier. It is more difficult with Polyester that doesn't stretch much.

But stringin the crosses on Yonex is easier cause it is straight across same length each cross, easier to weave.

good luck

iscottius

Ripper
01-03-2006, 07:24 AM
So the MP-5's design and the Klippermate's design are in conflict. That doesn't mean that Yonex has bad quality.

Zverev
01-03-2006, 01:29 PM
zverev,
I also used a klippermate with the yonex tour 5, when mounting the racquet, only the center of the base mounts will touch the frame, then screw down tight, It will be secure,

When I have looked at it, not even mount wedge center touches the frame, but the screw does, right in the middle of the frame, at one point.
I am thinking how to make mount wedges a bit higher so they could support the frame. And yes I do have to screw down very tight!

as for the flying clamp, you have to angle the clamp to get both the 18 & 19 crosses in the clamps, it can be done and will also get easier. It is more difficult with Polyester that doesn't stretch much.
iscottius
I am using kevlar, or Technora it's called, string. Doesn't stretch much.
Agree that it's possible to live with that, but it's a bit of a nuisance.
Could be done better.

Thanks for advice

monologuist
01-03-2006, 03:55 PM
As far as the weight discrepancy goes, I can confirm that even at a 4 3/8 grip, I've come across one MP Tour-5 that weighed 11.6 oz. stock, as opposed to all the others I've weighed that came in at around 11.3 oz. Not sure what to make of this, as this is not the "bigger grip size= higher weight" Yonex rule. That said, it was only one instance out of several (I've weighed 5 or 6 Tour-5's, all 4 3/8 grip) that was anomalous. This is far greater weight consistency than the majority of mass-produced frames, believe me. Judging from the several models of Yonex that I've tried and plyed over the years, I'd actually rate them amongst the best in terms of "tolerance" standards of weight and balance.

I will say that I agree that some of their "lower-level" offerings like the V-con series and the new Magnetic speed series look and feel somewhat cheap and the craftsmanship is noticeably shoddier than the player's frames like the RDX-500, TI-80, MP series, etc. These tweener frames are similar in quality to congruous offerings by Prince and Wilson.

I don't string my own racquets, so I can't vouch for how flawed or unflawed the MP Tour-5 is in terms of being stringer-friendly, but my stringer has never had any problems and I've never had any problems with premature tension loss or string breakage on my Tour-5's.

Overall, I'd rate the MP Tour-5 as being on a similar level of quality as the RDX-500, TI-70 and Ti-80, all of which I believe to be on par with the top level models by Volkl, Fischer, Vantage, and other companies noted for their quality control.

I have re-converted to Yonex after a brief flirtation with Vantage, primarily due to the fact that I decided to switch to a tighter 18x20 string pattern, which Vantage did not offer on their 100" model. So I'm playing the now discontinued TI-70 Long, which is similar in specs to the MP Tour-5(and even more similar to the TI-80) but with the 18x20 pattern and 27.25" length. This one is it for me for the long haul, thankfully, although I do use my Tour-5 from time to time if I want a tad bit more firepower and kick on my serves.

samster
01-03-2006, 06:56 PM
I string my MP Tour 5 on a Klippermate without any problems...not sure why Zverev had problems with it. I have four of them...their weight are the same unstrung. They are all 4 5/8 grips.

Craig Carter
01-03-2006, 07:16 PM
Never had a problem stringing MP 5's...and I have strung many. I believe the QC of Yonex to be very good based on my experiences over the years.

Zverev
01-03-2006, 08:40 PM
I am not saying that it's impossible to string,
I have it strung once.
I am saying that there are nuisances because of small design flaws,
and I have listed those.

I would much appreciate any advice which would address those nuisances specifically.
- Like, how do you clamp 18th and 19th cross when flying clamp doesn't open that wide?
- Or do you think it's good for the frame when mount wedges don't support the frame (because of triangular shape of cross section), but instead mount wedges screws support the frame just at one spot?

And if you are using Klippermate,
There is a possibility that you haven't noticed the last issue, so check your frame head at the top and the throat. If it's scratched on the inside of the frame, right between two middle mains, then that's what I am talking about.

Just a general comment:
I have listed specific issues, not just made a general statement that MP5 is bad. (I don't even care, MP5 is not a person.)
So specific comments regarding those issues would be much more constructive that just general statements that MP5 is a great frame.

RedKat
01-04-2006, 04:00 AM
I've just broken MP Tour-5. When I served it had slipped out of my hand during the followthrough and hit the ground (the butt cap is so small!!!). The surface was relatively soft - kind of carpet and the hit seemed not really hard. The hoop has broken in 2 places. I wonder whether it was a quality related issue and some other racquet could have survived? Might it have been because of the rectangular head shape? Is it weaker by design as compared to the "round" head?

djones
01-04-2006, 06:02 AM
Yeah, the butcap is just redicilous small.
The paint on the Yonex RDX500 is cheap too!
I dropped it once from about 1.5 meters high and it fell on something hard, but a big chip of paint chipped off, just like that!

RedKat
01-04-2006, 06:39 AM
Yeah, same with MP Tour-5

I played with it for a couples of times and found that pieces of paint chipped off here and there but I do not remember that I actually hit the surface or anything hard with the racquet!
Otherwise very sweet and comfortable frame, a bit underpowerd though.

Ripper
01-04-2006, 06:40 AM
I've just broken MP Tour-5. When I served it had slipped out of my hand during the followthrough and hit the ground (the butt cap is so small!!!). The surface was relatively soft - kind of carpet and the hit seemed not really hard. The hoop has broken in 2 places. I wonder whether it was a quality related issue and some other racquet could have survived? Might it have been because of the rectangular head shape? Is it weaker by design as compared to the "round" head?

Yeah, the butcap is just redicilous small.
The paint on the Yonex RDX500 is cheap too!
I dropped it once from about 1.5 meters high and it fell on something hard, but a big chip of paint chipped off, just like that!

Guys... Come on! Raquets are made of graphite, which is a very hard, but brittle material. Don't expect your frames to take that kind of abuse... Plus, the hoop is under all that stress, due to the high tension of the strings. So, if you hit it the wrong (or the right way), it'll crack... In regards to the paint, take a hammer and hit the paint on any Mercedes Benz, Rolls Royce or any car you think is well painted and see how the paint chips off, too!!!