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flash9
01-08-2006, 04:51 PM
Anyone know anything about the Head Pyramid Tour MidPlus? I have a friend who just gave me two to string up and he asked me my opinion of the racquets. They look to be pretty high quality graphite, and were made in Austria. What is the actual head size, it does not say on the frame? Were these player racquets? He is a good 4.0 player and is trying to determine if he needs to be switching racquets.

Any help would be appreciated.:confused:

Ronaldo
01-08-2006, 05:36 PM
An upgrade to the PC 600 everyone raves about. Stiffer and more headlight.

jck01
01-08-2006, 07:57 PM
Anyone know anything about the Head Pyramid Tour MidPlus? I have a friend who just gave me two to string up and he asked me my opinion of the racquets. They look to be pretty high quality graphite, and were made in Austria. What is the actual head size, it does not say on the frame? Were these player racquets? He is a good 4.0 player and is trying to determine if he needs to be switching racquets.

Any help would be appreciated.:confused:
I believe the Head Pyramid Tour MP racquets were part of Head's line of racquets from the early 1990's. I'm not sure but at the time, Head had the Pyramid Tour, Director, Master, and Edge in it's line-up. If there is someone who is more knowledgeable with the Head Pyramid racquets, please add to what I have said.

I hope your friend isn't thinking about changing his racquet because he feels that the Head Pyramid Tour is for lower level players. If your friend plays well with his Head Pyramid Tour MP's, I don't see why he would change them. I could see him changing his racquet if he feels he's outgrown them, though. :-)

Deuce
01-08-2006, 11:40 PM
The Pyramid was briefly part of Head's 'Tour' series of the mid 1990s which included the Prestige Tour, Pro Tour 280, Radical Tour, Satellite Tour, and Tour XL. The Pyramid was meant to be the top of the Tour line, above the Prestige. I suppose the reason it didn't last very long is because of its unique (some might say peculiar) triangular cross section, and its high price.

The Director, Master, and Edge series racquets came significantly before the Tour series.

galain
01-09-2006, 12:43 AM
There was a discussion about this frame about 5 weeks ago.

Bump for some other good folk who might have some more to say......

jck01
01-09-2006, 05:42 AM
The Pyramid was briefly part of Head's 'Tour' series of the mid 1990s which included the Prestige Tour, Pro Tour 280, Radical Tour, Satellite Tour, and Tour XL. The Pyramid was meant to be the top of the Tour line, above the Prestige. I suppose the reason it didn't last very long is because of its unique (some might say peculiar) triangular cross section, and its high price.

The Director, Master, and Edge series racquets came significantly before the Tour series.
Thanks for clarifying that Deuce. You seem to know a lot about the history of Head racquets. :-)

!Tym
01-09-2006, 06:58 AM
Actually, I find it more flexy feeling than the Prestige Classic, which has more of a solid, robust feel with more of that traditional raw ball feel. The Pyarmid Tour is more pillowy, smoother, and feels morel like playing with fiberglass, that kind of glassy feel.

Basically, the Pyarmid Tour feels like a finely tuned automatic transmission, think Audi; and the Prestige Classic feels like a vintage manual transmission from a classic sports car that grips the road.

I like both a lot. Believe it or not, I honestly couldn't say that I think the Prestige Classic is a better racket. They are just different rackets, but one is not better than the other.

The Pyramid Tour has more power, but has an even denser string pattern believe it or not, the densest I've ever seen in fact. It's got excellent control, but definitely a hair less pinpoint than the Prestige Classic in this regard. In terms of string sensitivity, the Pyramid Tour is miles ahead. One of the most sensitive rackets to strings and tensions I've ever used. It really seems to transmit the individual attributes and feels of various strings and string constructions/gauges better than any other racket I've used. Strangely enough, despite the ultra tightly packed 18x20 pattern, it gives very controllable and easy access to spin. It's not gaudy spin by any means, but seemingly always just enough that you feel like you have total control over the spin. It's a very TIGHT spin pattern that it imparts, a precise one. It's got more spin than the Prestige Classic in my opinion, and is a far better serving racket in every way except maybe flat serves. The Pyramid Tour cuts through the air like a knife on the serve, it's got good weight but doesn't feel it; because of it's unparalleled aerodynamics through the air. It's kind of like a pseudo Babolat Aero Pro type design before there was an Aero design. What makes the racket's beam unique is that instead of being boxy, it's boxy on the inside walls for stability, but slanted like the walls of a triangle (i.e. "Pyramid") on the outside. The result is a kind of hybrid feel between the solidity of a box beam and a the aerodyanmics of slanted walls. The v-bridge throat is really no different than the Volkl V-Engine in concept and it really does do it's intended job of increasing the sweetspot and distributing it more evenly in my opinion. The Prestige Classic is more of a traditional small sweetspot, where if you're off mark, you're really off mark. The Pyarmid Tour's sweetspot feels more like a lollipop by comparison.

The Pyramid Tour is not really a Head racket, nor is it really a Volkl racket, nor is it a Yonex racket...it's a little bit of all of the above. It's like a mad scientist brain stormed and decided to give a racket the feel halfway between "traditional Head" and the more sensitive, but muted Volkl feel; then decided to give the racket the solidity and unique isometric feel (best characterized by a solid, predictable, and evenly distributed sweetspot) of a Yonex head shape.

The strengths of the Pyramid Tour are primiarly that it is an exceedingly smooth racket from all parts of the court, and has a very comfortable and sensitive response. Basically what ever you imagine doing with the ball, you can do it with this racket. You feel like you can totally carve up the court with this racket from the baseline, going for a big flat bomb, a drop shot, an extreme topspin angle, really everything. It also has an incredibly natural feel on the slice backhand, most natural feeling on the slice I've ever felt in fact.
It's greatest strength is its serving capability. This thing serves effortlessly and makes you feel like you can carve up the court with ank kind of spin or speed. It just seems to go on auto pilot when you serve, and gives just enough of that modern oomph yet without losing any accuracy as you do with say the Pure Drive. Is this the hardest serving racket? No. Is it the spinniestest serving racket? No. Is it the most forgiving serving racket that lets you do whatever you want with the ball? Yes. For me, this racket is head and shoulders above any I've tried for serving.

Now for the weaknesses, because the Pyramid Tour does have them. Volleys, simply put, the head feels too big and lacks that maestro feel up at the net that you get with smaller headed frames such as the Prestige Classic. I can't say that it necessarily gives bad results up at net, just that it doesn't feel as natural up there. It feels a little clunk, imprecise, and in the way. You have to understand though how this racket was designed. It's a racket designed for aerodynamics, and to work at optimum capacity it needs to SWOOP into motion. Once it SWOOPS into motion, then this baby sings. It does harmonious things with the ball. On the volley though, of course, you more or less just stick your racket out there. This is why small headed, traditional box beam frames are still the preferred and most "natural feeling" choice up at net for most skilled players. There the inherent stability and solidity, not to mention the positive raw ball feedback transmitted to your hands, gives a feeling of control and precision.

Think why the Babolat Aero rackets are all the rage with the pros who duke it out from the baseline. Those aerodynamics weren't designed with volleys in mind, they were designed to feel most at home swinging away. Now, this does not necessarily mean you can't volley well with the Pyramid Tour, because you can. It's merely just a nagging feeling of what feels most "natural" up there. Doesn't mean a perfectly struck volley with either will be better than the other, just that one will give you more self-assurance and peace of mind. Kind of like comparing the "comfort level" of parallel parking a small, "cute ute" SUV into a tight space. The cute ute may not be that long, in fact, it's probably shorter than your car; yet when it comes to parallel parking, I don't know about you, but to me at least I still feel more "comfortable" parallel parking the car. Like I said, it's not necessarily that both don't fit into the parking space, it's that the SUV just SEEMS like a boat that won't fit whereas the car just seems like it'll glide into place.

So basically, give the Pyramid Tour a smaller, midsize head, and a more open string pattern; and you'd have a very exceptional player's racket. As it was, it was still a very exceptional player's racket in my opinion. It has it's quirks sure, but it also has major strengths as well too.

The Prestige Classic is the "revered" choice, but that doesn't mean the Pyramid Tour is bad or that the Prestige Classic is for everybody. If you're more an all-courter and like a more traditional feel and the feeling of belonging at the net that ONLY a midsize head can truly give you? Then, we know what your choice should be. If you're a Fabrice Santoro type, who wants to carve someone up from the baseline with total confidence in your ability to spin the ball with precision and touch and send it every which way and hold the intention of your shots to the last second? Then, be my guest, the Pyramid Tour can make you a maestro from there if you've got the goods. If you need a little help on the serve and return of serve? Pyramid Tour all the way.

I think primarily baseliners who impart an element of touch in their game and like to occasionally come in but not all the time will find a willing companion in the Pyramid Tour, Rios, Hingis, Santoro, Nalbandian types all come to mind. If you're more of a straight up, all-out ball pounder from the baseline like Safin then the Prestige Classic will give you a little more confidence when going for flat, screaming winners.

For the serve and volley types? The Pyaramid Tour is more for the Patrick Rafter/Henri Leconte/Stefan Edberg type who has a good but not great serve but great volleys (i.e. someone who could volley competently with a broom stick and not have to think twice about it), while the Prestige Classic would be more for the Goran Ivanisevic, Boris Becker type who could serve bombs with a broom stick and not have to think twice about it yet could use a little more feel and precision on the volleys.

Make sense? Of course, if having that raw, "old school" throaty Ferrari feel is important to you, then really it doesn't matter what I say. The Pyaramid Tour is NOT for you, as it's got more of the more modern, muted, Lexus type feel to it.

Deuce
01-09-2006, 10:59 PM
Thanks for clarifying that Deuce. You seem to know a lot about the history of Head racquets. :-)
Any knowledge I may have is the simple and inherent product of age. When you've been playing tennis for 25 years, you can't help but see a few things along the way.

It help to still have a few old racquet pamphlets around, as well. Until I looked at the pamphlet, I had forgotten about the Satellite Tour.

One thing I never did, though, was actually hit with a Pyramid Tour. Wish I had. Perhaps one day.

galain
01-10-2006, 01:46 AM
Bravo !Tym. Thank you very much for taking the time to write that.

Ronaldo
01-10-2006, 06:30 AM
!Tym, thanks. May re-string this Pyramid Tour and use it again.

PBODY99
01-10-2006, 01:08 PM
The Pyramid was briefly part of Head's 'Tour' series of the mid 1990s which included the Prestige Tour, Pro Tour 280, Radical Tour, Satellite Tour, and Tour XL. The Pyramid was meant to be the top of the Tour line, above the Prestige. I suppose the reason it didn't last very long is because of its unique (some might say peculiar) triangular cross section, and its high price.

The Director, Master, and Edge series racquets came significantly before the Tour series.

The Head Pyramid Series of frames used a triangular frame shape & face and were endorsed by Fred Stolle and other Aussie legends. They also used the Master, Edge & Directorfor the different models.
Makes it fun to string when companies name radically different rackets with names that are close to each other.:cool:

!Tym
01-10-2006, 04:49 PM
One thing though, pro racket stringer and legendary equipment guru on this board, Thomas Martinez, warned me that the Pyarmid Tour and the other Pyramid frames were all NOTORIOUS for cracking/fracturing during stringing, so be careful...this might be a very big reason why Head decided to shelve the design. It actually was a "technology" that did seem to do what they said as far as adding aerodynamics, maintaining stability, and adding pop...but what can you say? If it was an accident waiting to happen on the stringing room floor, I would be anxious to discontinue the design as well. Notice, that Head never really dumped the twin tube technology which like the pyramid technology, instead they just stopped advertising it...but you have to take into consideration that the twin tubes didn't fracture while stringing either.

Though I've never had a Pyramid Tour crack during stringing (I have a Laserfibre INSIDE-support mounting system which might help), I can see from looking at the racket how it might be a little fragile under going the INTENSE side wall pressure that six point mounting systems can impose since it's not a flat surface area where they'd contact, but instead just an edge. Something to think about it when considering this racket.

Finally, I would say that the Pyramid Tour kind of feels "sticky." Not quite like a gummy worm, but as Deuce once described the Gosen Polylon Ice string, the Pyramid Tour has that kind of "sticky" feel to it.

Probably the best string I've tried in the racket is Wilson Hammertech 18g, that string just seemed made for the racket.

henwal_of_sweden
01-11-2006, 04:33 AM
One thing though, pro racket stringer and legendary equipment guru on this board, Thomas Martinez, warned me that the Pyarmid Tour and the other Pyramid frames were all NOTORIOUS for cracking/fracturing during stringing, so be careful...this might be a very big reason why Head decided to shelve the design.

One of my team-mates used this racket in 97-98 season and he cracked both quit easy. 1:st racket was cracked first time he tried to "bounce" rhe racket after a missed shot on a dry clay court. Racket 2 cracked after he strung it at 29 kgs. At stringing it was nothing wrong, but after 2 hours when he was going to use the racket, it was , well how shall i explain, like a V in the top of the frame..

So i think i can pretty much agree that this racket breaks very easy compared to other rackets. Mayb it is so few layers of graphite in the top of the racket that it dont manage the power most of the Pyramid Tour users have???:confused:

Ronaldo
01-11-2006, 04:45 AM
Anyone that used Head Tour racquets from that generation will attest just how flexible the hoops are. Hoop is easily misshaped by an inappropriate stringjob. Now wary of stringing the stick up again. Wonderful racquets for anyone with arm problems but wet noodles for most on these boards that grew up with PDs.

prestige grl
01-14-2006, 08:01 PM
!Tym, I once saw someone use a grandma frame called the HEAD Pyramid Tech extra long OS. Do you have info on that?

Ronaldo
01-14-2006, 08:38 PM
Nah, remember there was a Head Pyramid Big Bang. Suppose that was the genesis, the beginning, eh?

Ronaldo
01-14-2006, 08:43 PM
But there was a Head Genesis so that blows that Big Bang Theory all to h*ll, eh?

dt101
06-16-2008, 08:19 PM
One thing though, pro racket stringer and legendary equipment guru on this board, Thomas Martinez, warned me that the Pyarmid Tour and the other Pyramid frames were all NOTORIOUS for cracking/fracturing during stringing, so be careful...this might be a very big reason why Head decided to shelve the design. It actually was a "technology" that did seem to do what they said as far as adding aerodynamics, maintaining stability, and adding pop...but what can you say? If it was an accident waiting to happen on the stringing room floor, I would be anxious to discontinue the design as well. Notice, that Head never really dumped the twin tube technology which like the pyramid technology, instead they just stopped advertising it...but you have to take into consideration that the twin tubes didn't fracture while stringing either.

Though I've never had a Pyramid Tour crack during stringing (I have a Laserfibre INSIDE-support mounting system which might help), I can see from looking at the racket how it might be a little fragile under going the INTENSE side wall pressure that six point mounting systems can impose since it's not a flat surface area where they'd contact, but instead just an edge. Something to think about it when considering this racket.

Finally, I would say that the Pyramid Tour kind of feels "sticky." Not quite like a gummy worm, but as Deuce once described the Gosen Polylon Ice string, the Pyramid Tour has that kind of "sticky" feel to it.

Probably the best string I've tried in the racket is Wilson Hammertech 18g, that string just seemed made for the racket.


I am concerned with this issue. Do you think it is a dumb idea to have Sport Chalet string my HEAD Pyramid Tour? I know they use a very advanced stringing machine (Babalot), but I just don't know exactly how experienced their stringers are. Sport Chalet is the best deal I have found. They charge me only $10 for labor and I can bring whatever strings I want to them.

dt101
06-16-2008, 08:25 PM
I want to string this racquet at 45 pounds (20 kg) with Gamma TNT2 18g. Is that a good choice?

galain
06-16-2008, 10:48 PM
dt

I don't know much about the Gamma string you mention but I have FibreGel 16 in my Pyramid at 53 and I find that that is even a little tight and boardy, so stringing at 45 I reckon would be quite ok.

I used the Pyramid Tour for a good 8 months or so and played really well with it. I never lost in that time and thought (and still think) it was an amazing serve volley frame. I just couldn't quite get to terms with the feel of it and moved on to settle at a PT630.

However, I don't think I really gave it much of a shot string wise and I'll probably try a few different setups soon at a lower tension than what i was using before.

Never had any second thoughts about durability with this one. I'm not usually rough on my racquets but it's always been very solid for me.

jayserinos99
06-16-2008, 10:53 PM
I remember asking Tom Martinez once about stringing this frame and he noted that these frames just cracked during stringing, irregardless of condition. That was probably the reason why I sold mine off. I will say that this frame played really well and !Tym wrote about it perfectly.

dt101
06-17-2008, 12:10 AM
dt

I don't know much about the Gamma string you mention but I have FibreGel 16 in my Pyramid at 53 and I find that that is even a little tight and boardy, so stringing at 45 I reckon would be quite ok.

I used the Pyramid Tour for a good 8 months or so and played really well with it. I never lost in that time and thought (and still think) it was an amazing serve volley frame. I just couldn't quite get to terms with the feel of it and moved on to settle at a PT630.

However, I don't think I really gave it much of a shot string wise and I'll probably try a few different setups soon at a lower tension than what i was using before.

Never had any second thoughts about durability with this one. I'm not usually rough on my racquets but it's always been very solid for me.


Thanks man! :cool:

dt101
06-17-2008, 12:14 AM
I remember asking Tom Martinez once about stringing this frame and he noted that these frames just cracked during stringing, irregardless of condition. That was probably the reason why I sold mine off. I will say that this frame played really well and !Tym wrote about it perfectly.

Damn! "You've you given me, given me, nothing but shattered dreams,
shattered dream!"


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQOZD0ayZeE


Maybe I should buy two of these racquets just in case I break one of them. That's exactly what I'll do! Screw it you only live once!

I don't care if this thing breaks easily. This is still the most badass looking racquet I have ever seen. The aerodynamics is breathtaking...it reminds me of a Lamborghini Countach! Thanks for the input man!:cool:

flash9
06-17-2008, 05:01 AM
I want to string this racquet at 45 pounds (20 kg) with Gamma TNT2 18g. Is that a good choice?

My friend/customer prefers Natural Gut and high end multifilaments, but since it is a 18M - 20X string pattern, I highly recommend the thinnest string. In gut we use 17ga, and either 17ga or 18ga in the multifilaments. He really like his racquest strung in the high range, like 58lbs!

As for where to get your racquet strung. I suggest doing some research. Go on to the USRSA website and search for local stringers using your zip code. If you can find a local CS or MRT then you know at least they have had the proper training.

Good Luck.

!Tym
06-17-2008, 02:23 PM
I want to string this racquet at 45 pounds (20 kg) with Gamma TNT2 18g. Is that a good choice?

I honestly wouldn't know. I never tried stringing the racket that low. I think the racket would play like a butterfly net at that setup though.

Bud
06-17-2008, 08:08 PM
I am concerned with this issue. Do you think it is a dumb idea to have Sport Chalet string my HEAD Pyramid Tour? I know they use a very advanced stringing machine (Babalot), but I just don't know exactly how experienced their stringers are. Sport Chalet is the best deal I have found. They charge me only $10 for labor and I can bring whatever strings I want to them.

I think you'll be fine... At what tension will you be stringing it?

dt101
06-17-2008, 10:23 PM
I think you'll be fine... At what tension will you be stringing it?

I want to string it at 45 pounds with TNT2 18g. Do you think the guys over at Sport Chalet are experienced enough to string this racquet and not crack it?

JW10S
06-17-2008, 10:32 PM
An upgrade to the PC 600 everyone raves about. Stiffer and more headlight.Having owned and played with both the PC600 and the Pyramid Tour I can say they played nothing alike--which is why the Pyramid Tour was not popular on the pro tour.