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View Full Version : Do anybody see Thin Red Line, what a great movie!


PM_
01-08-2006, 08:25 PM
What a great film. I can't believe it didn't take any Oscars, moreover Saving Private Ryan beat it out in all the categories Ryan won.
To me, this film tops the cake for best WW2 flicks.
Look at the cast:
Sean Penn
Adrien Brody
James Caviezel
Ben Chaplin
John Cusack
Woody Harrelson
and Nick Nolte.

Even George Clooney plays a minor role.
But I though Elias Koteas' portrayal of the captain in charge of the company was the best. He could easily have won the Oscar for supporting role.

What's your fav war film of all time? (this one's for you bp)

BreakPoint
01-08-2006, 08:36 PM
Isn't this a bit dated? I saw that movie when it came out in the theater like 7 or 8 years ago. Very bizarre! Just a strange movie. I think the last thing the world needs is an artsy war movie. :rolleyes: War is not supposed to be "beautiful" in any way. It is supposed to be disgusting, sickening, profane, obcene, bloody, crass, raw, gutsy, emotional, candid, vile, replusive, shocking, unbearable, etc. That's what made "Saving Private Ryan" so good. :D

Sorry, I missed your last question addressed to me. Hmmm....I would have to say "Battle of the Bulge" is my most favorite WWII movie of all time. Robert Ryan as the German tank commander was great! I must have seen that movie 100 times from when I was a child in the theater!

PM_
01-08-2006, 09:56 PM
Isn't this a bit dated? I saw that movie when it came out in the theater like 7 or 8 years ago. Very bizarre! Just a strange movie. I think the last thing the world needs is an artsy war movie. :rolleyes: War is not supposed to be "beautiful" in any way. It is supposed to be disgusting, sickening, profane, obcene, bloody, crass, raw, gutsy, emotional, candid, vile, replusive, shocking, unbearable, etc. That's what made "Saving Private Ryan" so good. :D


Bp, I think you got the two mixed up.
There are so many examples of authenticity in war in The Thin Red Line. I think the director tried to show as many emotions in the soldiers as he could. How many times do you see someone crying in Private Ryan, except when someone's dying. Maybe once when Matt Damon is crying in fear towards the end. There's something impacting when a man cries cinematically. Very deep.

But I agree it that it is a strange movie indeed. It can get to your mind cos I think it tries to share what is going on.

devilish_duke
01-08-2006, 10:03 PM
I thought PAtton was a pretty good WW2 movie. Thin Red Line was decent, but not as great as I thought it would be.

mansrow
01-08-2006, 10:53 PM
anyone remember the scene in shaving private ryan where one of the soldiers got stabed real slow into his chest by the bad guy? best scene and kinda gross me out.
you should c COD2 too

BreakPoint
01-08-2006, 11:05 PM
Bp, I think you got the two mixed up.
There are so many examples of authenticity in war in The Thin Red Line. I think the director tried to show as many emotions in the soldiers as he could. How many times do you see someone crying in Private Ryan, except when someone's dying. Maybe once when Matt Damon is crying in fear towards the end. There's something impacting when a man cries cinematically. Very deep.

But I agree it that it is a strange movie indeed. It can get to your mind cos I think it tries to share what is going on.

No, not mixed up at all. I saw "Saving Private Ryan" twice in the theater (first time was the first showing on opening day in NYC and I skipped out of work to see it as I was highly anticipating this movie), and also saw it another dozen times or so on TV (HBO, etc.).

I also saw "Thin Red Line", as I said in the theater and also several more times on TV (HBO, etc.).

"Thin Red Line" was just strange. What was with all the freaked out Japanese soldiers? :confused: I don't think they could have put up much of a fight when almost all of them were freaking INSANE!!!

The Normany D-Day landing scene and the climatic town battle scene in "SPR" were just intense. Yeah, that scene with the slow stabbing still makes me cringe everytime I see it, and I think that soldier being stabbed was just about crying, too. How about the other American soldier in that same room that was shot in the neck and was slowly choking and bleeding to death? That looked pretty realistic to me, too.

armand
01-08-2006, 11:40 PM
SPR is quite Hollywood by the ever box office pleaser, Steven Spielberg. It's an excellent film, just not nearly as deep or as long lasting as The Thin Red Line. Terence Malick only makes films once in 20 years. He's out of practise with that clip but he's also much less affected by Hollywood and is able to deliver something with more meaning and art.

P.S. SPR also featured easily the worst miscast that I have ever seen. Tom Hanks is a fine actor but he was totally beyond his range as the platoon leader.

P.P.S. PM_ did you see it on The History Channel?

PM_
01-09-2006, 09:45 AM
SPR is quite Hollywood by the ever box office pleaser, Steven Spielberg. It's an excellent film, just not nearly as deep or as long lasting as The Thin Red Line. Terence Malick only makes films once in 20 years. He's out of practise with that clip but he's also much less affected by Hollywood and is able to deliver something with more meaning and art.

P.S. SPR also featured easily the worst miscast that I have ever seen. Tom Hanks is a fine actor but he was totally beyond his range as the platoon leader.

P.P.S. PM_ did you see it on The History Channel?

Yeah I did. Unfortunately I never saw it on the big screen. My friend told me it was so whacked up and I didn't think twice after that.
But now that I've seen it twice on the tube, it's looking better each time. I bought SPR on dvd, and enjoy watching it occasionally.

Bp, I think Malick purposefully tries to "freak" out the Japanese in the film b/c perhaps they know their end is near. It's a last stand for them, to protect those parts in the Philippines (?) and maybe they don't want to be there.
But yes, it definitely shows. I especially like the end, where Caviezel buys it, where a Japanese soldier pleads with him to drop his rifle-he doesn't want to order his squad to shoot him. Quite touching.

It'll be interesting to see what some of these Iraqi war films will be like.

tennis-n-sc
01-09-2006, 12:04 PM
TRL should be seen several times. The response of the "insane" was taken from the book and is very common in battle, along with cowardice, heroism, indifference, butchery, civility, introspect and many others. Malick captures all these very well, just not to the acceptance of many U.S. audiences that have become hypnoptized to Hollywood war.

SPR was fiction and touching in many respects. The first 30" are reviting and perhaps the best Hollywood footage ever for a war movie. To me the most touching scenes were those shot in the cemetary at the beginning and end of the movie and the scene where the mother is told about her loss. It explains the loss at home and the fact that no matter how old the veteran is, he or she will never forget and always question the meaning of what occurred.

To me, no movie has ever fully dipicted any war accurately although pieces of several have come close, including The Thin Red Line, We Were Soldiers, Full Metal Jacket, and surprisingly, Good Morning Vietnam, Forrest Gump and Born on the Fourth of July.

PM_
01-09-2006, 12:41 PM
TRL should be seen several times. The response of the "insane" was taken from the book and is very common in battle, along with cowardice, heroism, indifference, butchery, civility, introspect and many others. Malick captures all these very well, just not to the acceptance of many U.S. audiences that have become hypnoptized to Hollywood war.

SPR was fiction and touching in many respects. The first 30" are reviting and perhaps the best Hollywood footage ever for a war movie. To me the most touching scenes were those shot in the cemetary at the beginning and end of the movie and the scene where the mother is told about her loss. It explains the loss at home and the fact that no matter how old the veteran is, he or she will never forget and always question the meaning of what occurred.

To me, no movie has ever fully dipicted any war accurately although pieces of several have come close, including The Thin Red Line, We Were Soldiers, Full Metal Jacket, and surprisingly, Good Morning Vietnam, Forrest Gump and Born on the Fourth of July.

Very well said. :p

stc9357
01-09-2006, 01:26 PM
To understand the movie entirely you would have to read the book and the book tells you a lot more about the characters!