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dannyjjang
01-18-2006, 08:16 AM
i can't play in tennis team beacuse my b pressure is 170

only exercise i can do i walking, if i do play pressure goes up to 200 and possibly can get a damage later on in my life, im 17 so the doctor says there are no permanant damage but ...damn i can't play
got to pray to jesus christ my lord and savior....ne tips i might able to lower it in 2 weeks to join but uncertain....

Chuck
01-18-2006, 08:33 AM
Has the doc put you on any medications? B/P can be controlled to allow you to play.

Tchocky
01-18-2006, 08:39 AM
Aren't you like 17 years old? What are you doing? Do your parents have high blood pressure as well? Pray to Jesus...I'm sure he can help.

Match Po¡nt
01-18-2006, 09:12 AM
i can't play in tennis team beacuse my b pressure is 170

only exercise i can do i walking, if i do play pressure goes up to 200 and possibly can get a damage later on in my life, im 17 so the doctor says there are no permanant damage but ...damn i can't play
got to pray to jesus christ my lord and savior....ne tips i might able to lower it in 2 weeks to join but uncertain....Describe your weight, height, daily diet, medical history (any illnesses past/ present, injuries, allergies etc.)., and current medications and or supplements.

I just need to know where you are coming from to see what could potentially be done. I can't give any furthar advice from here on without the relevant info. If you are embarassed and cannot provide full honest information then I am sorry that I can't help you help yourself.

Andres
01-18-2006, 09:33 AM
Stop eating with sault.
Seriously, do not eat sault. at all.

Or at least, try to get those SODIUM-FREE or SODIUM-REDUCED types of sault.

Match Po¡nt
01-18-2006, 09:56 AM
Andres, do you know dannyjjang's medical history? He hasn't posted it. Unless you know it because he provided it to you some time ago, I wouldn't make any of those kinds of suggestions if I were you. Even if you are a doctor, you shouldn't give advice like that without knowing his history. For some people, being deprived of sodium chloride can induce an electrolyte imbalance and that can trigger another illness. Just FYI when giving medical advice.

Ronaldo
01-18-2006, 08:10 PM
danny, why is your BP so high? Exercise increases your BP. Had a narrowing of my aeorta which contributed to my heart working harder than it should during exercise. While being monitored on an airdyne, heartrate ~130 bpm, my systolic BP reading was nearly 240, near the stroke level, pulled off the bike and forced to cooldown. After replacing the narrowed portion of the aeorta with dacron, no longer have BP problems. This is not as simple as treating the BP with meds.

dannyjjang
01-19-2006, 08:12 AM
hmm my granpa died from it my dad gets medication from it..
i get 72 pulse beat or something i've been eating JUNK FOOD alot maybe thats the reason, so no meat for me i gota diet for good reason might help me in tennis having strict diet program

Match Po¡nt
01-19-2006, 08:50 AM
hmm my granpa died from it my dad gets medication from it..
i get 72 pulse beat or something i've been eating JUNK FOOD alot maybe thats the reason, so no meat for me i gota diet for good reason might help me in tennis having strict diet program
Well staying away from junk food shouldn't be harmful. Also, an active heart rate of 72 BPM is not bad for either a child or an adult on average (By "active" I mean as in you're up and going in the day, "not" meaning that your body is excessively active undergoing stress from physical activity like from playing sports.) . If 72 BPM is the resting heart rate then it's not the greatest but not terrible either ("A resting heart rate is when your body is relaxed, like when you are ready to go to sleep or sometimes when you have just woken up.)

As far as your blood pressure being 170 (I am assuming that's the systolic bp) that is a bit higher than average. Blood pressure measures are determined to be hypertensive or hypotensive, depending on how doctors analyze the indivdual by their age, gender, physique, race is a factor at times, the medications that they may taking, family history, and medical history. An example of borderline hypertension would be if a male at the age of 27 with no previous health complications, no previous operations, no allergies, and no current use of medications (basically he's in good health except for his BP reading) had a BP of 139/77. That's just an average example. Of course to have a proper diagnosis, everything should be handled in is a case by case manner by a physician.

If there are any lifestyle changes that would lower your blood pressure than I would recommend making a commitment to take those routes if I were you. If it means losing weight, excercising, diet changes, etc. it can't be that bad compared to just doing nothing and leaving things to the doctors if and when you should face a real problem. If you haven't consulted a doctor, go right on ahead and work out a plan.

Also, one thing that I can advise (without needing your personal information and without needing to be your primary care physician) to you is take it easy. Don't stress out. Don't get angry. Be nice to others. Be nice to yourself. Don't be overly worried about things.

dannyjjang
01-19-2006, 02:26 PM
Well staying away from junk food shouldn't be harmful. Also, an active heart rate of 72 BPM is not bad for either a child or an adult on average (By "active" I mean as in you're up and going in the day, "not" meaning that your body is excessively active undergoing stress from physical activity like from playing sports.) . If 72 BPM is the resting heart rate then it's not the greatest but not terrible either ("A resting heart rate is when your body is relaxed, like when you are ready to go to sleep or sometimes when you have just woken up.)

As far as your blood pressure being 170 (I am assuming that's the systolic bp) that is a bit higher than average. Blood pressure measures are determined to be hypertensive or hypotensive, depending on how doctors analyze the indivdual by their age, gender, physique, race is a factor at times, the medications that they may taking, family history, and medical history. An example of borderline hypertension would be if a male at the age of 27 with no previous health implications, no previous operations, no allergies, and no current use of medications (basically he's in good health except for his BP reading) had a BP of 139/77. That's just an average example. Of course to have a proper diagnosis, everything should be handled in is a case by case manner by a physician.

If there are any lifestyle changes that would lower your blood pressure than I would recommend making a commitment to take those routes if I were you. If it means losing weight, excercising, diet changes, etc. it can't be that bad compared to just doing nothing and leaving things to the doctors if and when you should face a real problem. If you haven't consulted a doctor, go right on ahead and work out a plan.

Also, one thing that I can advise (without needing your personal information and without needing to be your primary care physicain) to you is take it easy. Don't stress out. Don't get angry. Be nice to others. Be nice to yourself. Don't be overly worried about things.

Thanks, i was angry because i glutton, i let my food control me, although i exercise vigorously i wondered why i was gaining weight other than losing it.
Physical check up was a wake up call, i was messing the God given body with junk foods and unhealthy products. I ate food as pleasure...feel guilty about it when the 3rd World countries are eating to survive. I think we all should careful of what we eat, love our body and appreciate people like match point. Thx

Match Po¡nt
01-19-2006, 04:09 PM
Dannyjjang, for the problem(s) that you deem to be causing your high blood pressure, if they actually are the real problem(s) causing the condition then at least you realize it.

A lot of people don't take the best care of their bodies. Some people drink excessivley, smoke ciggarettes, abuse substances, look to the outside world just waitng to be offended in some way (negative attitude that leads to stress that then leads to elevated cortisal levels in the body which are toxic, harming your body), or may do other things under their conscious will or sometimes they do those things because they have an underlying mental condition that they are totally unaware of.

Don't be too hard on yourself. You know there are people who are in the same situation that you're in and that they have overcome it and are now in great health. So now that should be a relief.......so go ahead and make it "just another task" to get better.

jackson vile
01-28-2006, 06:53 PM
Pottasium and magnesium will drop that right down guaranteed, love that stuff

jackson vile
02-02-2006, 08:43 AM
The first number is called systolic pressure and the second, diastolic. Each time the heart beats, there is an increase in pressure. This high point is called systolic pressure. In between beats is the low point called diastolic pressure. Diastolic pressure is given the most attention because if it is too high, the arteries are under excessive pressure even when the heart is relaxed. In the nonstressed adult, the diastolic pressure should be well under 90. In well-conditioned athletes, it's not unusual to find diastolics in the low 60s.


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Care and Feeding

"While some people need drugs to lower their blood pressure, millions can do it through diet," says Norman Kaplan, M.D., the nationally known blood pressure expert, in Nutrition Action Newsletter. Add to that stopping smoking, keeping alcohol intake at a minimum (or not at all, depending on blood pressure levels), learning relaxation techniques, exercising regularly, and taking nutrient supplements to combat toxins, complete any dietary inadequacies, and bring optimal support to physical health and the recipe for the recovery and conservation of good health is complete. Eating an ideal diet will not only lower blood pressure but restore health to damaged blood vessels, kidneys, hearts, and brains. Whole fresh, lively foods; lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, especially leafy greens; grains and legumes; nuts and seeds; only low fat or no fat dairy foods; lighten up on meat and put deep water fish on the menu at least once a week. This diet ensures high fiber intake, increased unsaturated fat and decreased saturated fat intake, a beneficial mineral balance, and, weight loss, if required. A natural diet also implies greater fiber intake and the use of vegetable-based (rather than animal-based) oil sources. Both high fiber levels and low fat intake, emphasizing unsaturated fats, have been shown to have benefits in lowering blood pressure. As naturopathic physician Michael Murray has stated, "The lack of dietary fiber is a common underlying factor in many diseases of western 'civilization.'" High fiber diets have been shown to be effective in preventing and treating many forms of cardiovascular problems, including hypertension. In addition, the presence of soluble fibers in the body clears the blood of toxins like lead and cadmium, both of which have been found in higher than normal levels in persons with high blood pressure.

Concerning fat intake, in cultures where the diet is high in poly- or mono-unsaturated fatty acids, blood pressure levels are more healthy. This is because the body uses vegetable fatty acids to make those little cellular hormones called prostaglandins. Some of these, the "E" series, regulate blood pressure and are known to be decreased in hypertensive people. In addition, a wholesome diet is low in sodium, provides sufficient potassium, magnesium, and calcium (necessary to healthy blood pressure, see section "Magic Minerals"), and is free of denatured foods like salt, sugar, hydrogenated fats, caffeine, and white flour. Denatured foods activate the stress response, using up nutrients and weakening the body's ability to recover from emotional stressors. (And, yes, people who have high stress jobs do tend to have higher average blood pressure than others, a phenomenon which has only recently been verified in the laboratory.) Last, even moderate amounts of alcohol can produce acute hypertension in some people. The problem is labeled acute because researchers at Northwestern University have found that blood pressure goes down when drinking ceases and gradually returns to unsafe levels when drinking resumes. In their article, these researchers emphasize the responsibility physicians have in learning about the alcohol use of their patients. Chronic drinkers, given the same treatment as nondrinkers, do not achieve the same degree of blood pressure control. And, of course, smoking is out. Not only is it a major heart disease risk factor, nicotine actually constricts the small blood vessels, directly affecting blood pressure levels.
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To Salt or Not To Salt

Blood pressure rises in two ways: 1) the arteries constrict, creating a greater resistance to blood flow; 2) fluid in the cardiovascular system is increased. Sodium can be at the base of both of these phenomena. Although sodium occurs naturally in food, it accounts for only about 10 percent of total sodium intake. It is sodium chloride, salt, which is the culprit. In cultures where salt is used, people tend to have higher blood pressure than those from cultures where salt is not used. Further, in salt-using cultures, blood pressure levels escalate with age. Although only 200-1000 mg of sodium a day are essential for health, the average American consumes 10-50 times that amount. Some folks are salt resistant and can eat these amounts all their lives without deleterious effect. However, as many as 40 percent of people with high blood pressure are "salt sensitive." Their blood pressure falls with a low salt diet. This sensitivity to salt is higher among African-Americans, the elderly (the kidneys slow down with age and so don't excrete excess sodium as easily), people who are overweight, and those who have a family history of high blood pressure.
Since there is no simple test or diagnosis for salt sensitivity, the general advice to people with high blood pressure is to assume that you are sensitive and reduce your intake. The British Medical Journal reported that a modest reduction of sodium (from 8 grams down to 5 grams per day) will reduce the risk of stroke by 22 percent and heart disease by 16 percent. Even if you are not at risk, if you are a woman, you may want to cut back on your salt intake. The higher your salt intake, the more water retention and weight gain you may experience premenstrually. If you are using The Pill or estrogen therapy, salt will cause additional bloating. Further, salt may increase the risk of premature osteoporosis. The more salt in your diet, the more calcium will be excreted from your body. Moderate salt intake is considered to be no more than 4-6 grams per day. It is important to remember that 75 percent of the salt in the average diet comes from processed foods. We add only 15 percent to food at the table.

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Natural Blood Pressure Control

"...a clear understanding of the relationships between sodium, potassium, and magnesium would, in my opinion, eliminate the need for blood pressure medication for roughly half of those currently taking it." This statement was made by Julian Whitaker, M.D., in his newsletter Health & Healing. As you will read in the section "To Salt or Not to Salt," there is nearly universal agreement on the importance of limiting sodium intake, especially for people with hypertension. However, Dr. Whitaker states unequivocally that it is as important to increase your intake of both magnesium and potassium as it is to reduce your intake of salt. Potassium works with sodium to help regulate fluids in the cells, and to equalize the acid-alkaline balance in the blood. To function correctly, these minerals need to be present in the body in a ratio of 5:1, potassium to sodium. Health Counselor editor Karolyn Gazella reports that the typical American diet includes twice as much sodium as potassium. This results in water retention and the loss of potassium through the urine. In fact, Researchers from the University of Mississippi report that too little potassium combined with too much sodium may be a major contributing factor in the development of hypertension.

To study the effects of potassium on blood pressure, researchers at Duke University ran double-blind studies using potassium supplements. Participants receiving the supplements experienced a significant reduction in blood pressure. African-Americans showed the biggest drop. Their blood pressure went down almost 20 points, causing the speculation that this sub-group might be particularly sensitive to the blood pressure lowering effects of potassium. Further, animal studies have shown potassium to be protective against both kidney damage and strokes, two of the major health problems which can occur as a result of ongoing high blood pressure. When high blood pressure occurs, patients are given diuretics to stimulate the excretion of excess fluids. Since this process robs the body of potassium, potassium supplements are often prescribed. However, magnesium, which has been called "one of the most promising and least-used minerals" for blood pressure control, is also lost. It is not replaced. Unfortunately, the body cannot store potassium without magnesium. In the presence of adequate amounts of both potassium and magnesium, the potassium itself increases the excretion of sodium and excess fluids.

jackson vile
02-02-2006, 08:45 AM
Dietary sources of potassium include apple juice, apricots, avocado, bananas, legumes, beets, cantaloupe, carrots, oranges, pears, white and sweet potatoes, raisins, salmon, sardines, watermelon, and winter squash. Amounts of 4-6 grams per day are recommended. Magnesium is highest in whole grains and leafy greens, but also occurs in many fruits and vegetables. The recommended intake ranges from 300-500 mg. Dr. Kaplan reports a "major controversy" surrounding the usefulness of calcium in lowering blood pressure. However, he did indicate that up to 30 percent of people with high blood pressure also excrete calcium in their urine and that in those cases additional calcium might be useful. Writing for the Journal of Hypertension, Lawrence Resnick, M.D. reported the effectiveness of calcium, two grams per day, in lowering blood pressure in people who are salt sensitive. The authors of a 1985 study appearing in JAMA report finding that African-American men have lower calcium levels partly as a result of lactase deficiency, indicating another use for calcium supplementation. Calcium is found in yogurt and other milk products, soybeans, sardines, salmon, peanuts, sunflower seeds, and leafy greens.
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Important Minerals

Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. High blood pressure is the most common known risk factor. (It is also a risk factor for heart attack.) Evidence exists showing that adequate levels of magnesium, potassium, and calcium to be linked with lower blood pressure. The importance of magnesium in blood pressure control is demonstrated by a recent study conducted by Honolulu Heart Program researchers. When 61 different dietary factors were examined, magnesium showed the strongest link between high intake and low blood pressure. Men getting 330-1,429 mg a day had the lowest blood pressure. A Georgetown University study showed that persons with high blood pressure had an 11 percent drop following magnesium therapy. Giving extra potassium to people with mildly elevated blood pressure can also result in decreases. A Duke University study showed that after two months of potassium supplementation, hypertensives experienced as much as a 20 point drop in blood pressure. In a 12 year study reported by the New England Journal of Medicine, there were 24 deaths associated with stroke among the 859 subjects. Adjusting for calorie intake, the authors found that dietary potassium intake was significantly lower in those dying of stroke. One-third to one-half of all people with high blood pressure, and especially African Americans and older people, are salt sensitive. Lawrence Resnick, M.D., of the Cardiovascular Center at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, has found that adding 2,000 mg of calcium a day blunts salt's blood pressure raising effects. He commented, "... the more salt elevates blood pressure, the more calcium lowers it."

Potassium : Potassium is a key nutrient in maintaining the electrolyte balance which regulates heart and muscle contraction. Potassium is a key nutrient in maintaining the electrolyte balance which regulates heart and muscle contraction. It also plays an important role in maintaining proper fluid exchange.
Magnesium: Magnesium is essential for the production of ATP, the body's primary energy producing molecule, as well as for the manufacture of protein by cellular ribosomes. It also mediates proper muscle function, providing the mechanism for relaxation of muscles including the heart muscle. Magnesium is essential for the production of ATP, the body's primary energy producing molecule, as well as for the manufacture of protein by cellular ribosomes. It also mediates proper muscle function, providing the mechanism for relaxation of muscles including the heart muscle.
Garlic: Garlic helps to lower cholesterol. It is also useful in colds and flu, ringworm, intestinal worms, and for liver, gallbladder, and digestive support. Garlic is without a doubt one of man's most useful original herbal medicines. The first written record of Garlic is roughly 5,000 years old. The list of ailments it has effectively been used to treat is so extensive space does not permit a complete listing. It bears an outstanding reputation in the treatment of circulatory problems, weak digestion, and warding off respiratory problems.
CoQ10: Since 1957 when CoQ10 was originally isolated by Dr. Fred Crane of the University of Wisconsin, studies have shown it to be effective in strengthening the heart, lowering blood pressure, enhancing the immune system, and protecting against periodontal disease. It is an antioxidant with all the attending benefits, plus it has been useful to people with AIDS, cancer, diabetes, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Considering all these health advantages, the implications of also using CoQ10 to enhance longevity become obvious.

http://www.bodyandfitness.com/Information/Health/bloodpressure.htm