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Pomeranian
01-21-2006, 07:00 PM
Does anyone know the actual playtest results of string tension on the more extreme ranges. I know that generally, looser string tension gives you more power but obviously you can't play with a net in your racquet. So there has to be somewhere in between where lower tension actually gives less power. So if you were to graph the different tensions how would it look like?

High tensions, assuming that the string wouldn't break I think would have very little dwell time, low power, and an arm killer.
Normal tension ranges would have a normal ammount of tension and power.
Very low tensions would have more dwell time, less power, very arm friendly

Another question to ask is what is a trampoline effect? I've heard of it mentioned but I do not understand what it is.And do higher tensions give you more depth control or directional control. Because I know a lot of people say if you are hitting long, just string higher, but couldn't you also string lower since it gives less power?

Midlife crisis
01-21-2006, 11:19 PM
Here's the article from RSI:

http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/issues/200502/200502strings.html

There's a section near the top on tension and power, and it says that dropping the string tension by 10 pounds increases ball speed by only 0.7% on a 60 MPH groundstroke, meaning the looser racquet will hit the ball at 60.4 MPH.

Pomeranian
01-22-2006, 12:22 AM
Interesting, so to sum up the article, more power is an illusion from higher take of angle from string bed on loose tension, more spin on tight strings is caused by compensation of a faster swing, and most players can't feel the difference between tension differences.

So is the trampoline effect something that happens with low tensions because it slides on the stringbed then sets off at a higher angle? That's what I always assumed it meant but wasn't sure... If so could that same concept be applied in a way when changing the direction of a shot for a put away volley for example, would that trampoline effect affect the accuracy of the volley to some extent?

Midlife crisis
01-22-2006, 12:33 AM
So is the trampoline effect something that happens with low tensions because it slides on the stringbed then sets off at a higher angle? That's what I always assumed it meant but wasn't sure... If so could that same concept be applied in a way when changing the direction of a shot for a put away volley for example, would that trampoline effect affect the accuracy of the volley to some extent?

I think the general idea is that the faster you can get the ball off the strings, the more accurate the shot will be. Not only will the ball come off the stringbed at closer to the angle that it first hits it, mis-hits will have less time to alter the angle of the stringbed by twisting the racquet before the ball leaves the strings as well.

I also think there's an issue of response consistency. The elastic response of the strings and ball are different. With a looser stringbed or more elastic strings, the ball doesn't compress much with softer hits, but with harder hits, it has to compress. I think this is one reason why looser stringbeds feel inconsistent, and I've noticed this as I've experimented with strings and tensions. I once put NXT OS in my 115 sq. in. racket at 60 lbs on a lockout machine, and of course from there it lost tension. When I would hit hard, the ball would tend to fly higher than I expected, and when I hit softly, it would tend to fly lower than I expected. It made it really hard to play with any consistency.

Kevo
01-23-2006, 11:44 AM
I've found that the best control I get is from a string that is tight yet stretchy. I have found only a couple of strings that I can get a long enough dwell time with that makes this work, but I only know one for sure. The other was a demo and the markings on the string had worn off, so I didn't know what it was. Anyway, with a long enough dwell time, accuracy seems to go up for me. Mainly because I can feel the ball on the strings and direct it after making contact. I know it sounds strange, but it's a pretty incredible feeling when you can sense exactly where the ball is on the strings. The angles you can hit are absurd too.

Kevo
01-23-2006, 11:46 AM
Oh, I forgot to mention that some strings have a more linear response than others. Synthetic guts seem to be the most linear. Multis vary a lot, but some are quite non-linear. So there is no single answer on tension extremes. It will work for some strings and not for others.

jtreed2000
01-23-2006, 01:04 PM
To answer the last part, I believe when you get to the point you're stringing LOWER for LESS power you'd be making a huge sacrifice in control. The loose for power, tight for control are general statements, but changing headsizes has more to do with power differences than string. A tighter stringbed vs a looser one should be more predictable with most strings. There are so many variables though and probably these tests don't take into account like... we rarely hit dead-on the sweetspot, play with dead strings, use all kinds of spins/swings, etc. I read once that stringing outside of the mfr's tensions by 15% generally will produce bad results and I can't say I disagree. The best advice I've seen though for stringing was a chart with headsizes and recommended tensions for those racquets. Maybe it was here, TW? Anyway, it was surprising how much the tensions varied based only on headsize. It seems like I've read an 85-90sq/in racquet could be strung as low as the high forties (and be playable), but would make controlling an OS racquet (110+) very tricky. It's all relative. Those tensions are there for a reason. Go to the extremes and it'd probably be best to go to another racquet.