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View Full Version : What gives a racquet 'feel'?


vkartikv
01-24-2006, 02:14 PM
I understand what makes a racquet more powerful or lighter or tangibles like that, but how can a racquet be altered to give more feel? I have found volkls to be the best in this department (the ps 6.0 following a close second) but its all graphite/kevlar, or some metal hybrid, right? So what is the component that adds feel?

Ripper
01-24-2006, 02:16 PM
What the heck do people mean by "feel" in a raquet, anyway??? Seriously.

vkartikv
01-24-2006, 02:17 PM
To me its a mix of comfort and the way the ball feels on the racquet (compared to another with the same strings and tension) and the response/reaction derived from it.

Pen Express
01-24-2006, 02:26 PM
To me its a mix of comfort and the way the ball feels on the racquet (compared to another with the same strings and tension) and the response/reaction derived from it.

Same here, vkartikv.

texcoug
01-24-2006, 03:12 PM
low flex rating (meaning, less stiff). just one idea.

louis netman
01-24-2006, 03:21 PM
Material composition, flex, beam shape, beam width, handle system, head size, string density, and even string type are all contributing factors that influence the feel of a racket. Generaly the thinner the beam, the more one can "feel" the ball on the strings. Titanium and other metals in the mix add a tinny, metalic feel, kevlar is shock absorbing and stiffer, fiberglass is shock absoring and more flexible. Denser patterns tend to feel more solid, open patterens tend to feel more comfortable given the same tension......
New Volkls have "Sensor Tour System" in the handle which is a layer of dense (albeit rather thin) shock absorbing foam around the frame part of the "handle," underneath the pallet. It supposedly deadens the vibration of the shot (it does work), however, some stringbed "feel" may be sacrificed. If you examine the older C series (ala C10, etc.), this foam layer is nonexistent. That's why the C series have a feel that can't compare with any of the newer Volkls....

vkartikv
01-24-2006, 03:22 PM
is there anything that can be done once the racquet has been manufactured to add feel?

scotus
01-24-2006, 03:27 PM
is there anything that can be done once the racquet has been manufactured to add feel?

Your best bet is to play around with different strings and tension rather than the racquet.

vkartikv
01-24-2006, 03:29 PM
Material composition, flex, beam shape, beam width, handle system, head size, string density, and even string type are all contributing factors that influence the feel of a racket. Generaly the thinner the beam, the more one can "feel" the ball on the strings. Titanium and other metals in the mix add a tinny, metalic feel, kevlar is shock absorbing and stiffer, fiberglass is shock absoring and more flexible. Denser patterns tend to feel more solid, open patterens tend to feel more comfortable given the same tension......
New Volkls have "Sensor Tour System" in the handle which is a layer of dense (albeit rather thin) shock absorbing foam around the frame part of the "handle," underneath the pallet. It supposedly deadens the vibration of the shot (it does work), however, some stringbed "feel" may be sacrificed. If you examine the older C series (ala C10, etc.), this foam layer is nonexistent. That's why the C series have a feel that can't compare with any of the newer Volkls....


That's probably why I liked the C10 Pros. Thanks for the info louis netman..

louis netman
01-24-2006, 03:30 PM
is there anything that can be done once the racquet has been manufactured to add feel?

using thinner guage strings or natural gut & adding leather grip.

fishuuuuu
01-24-2006, 03:33 PM
I'm going to go against the norm here and say the player. Feel is all subjective ... I mean look at the insane drop shots, angles, and lobs Ljubicic makes from his Pure Drive. The way some members talk about that racquet you'd think it was a wooden plank.

Midlife crisis
01-24-2006, 03:59 PM
To me its a mix of comfort and the way the ball feels on the racquet (compared to another with the same strings and tension) and the response/reaction derived from it.

vkartikv, ask yourself the question of what does this feel do for you? By the time your brain registers the impact of the ball, it's long gone from your strings. There's no way that feel can alter the shot you just made, and if you were to blindfold yourself, feel wouldn't have any way of telling you if the shot you just hit went low, high, left, right, in the court, or out of the court - your eyes will tell you that. Feel only tells you if you where you hit the ball on the stringbed, which really is only important for that one piece of information and using it to help you determine if where the ball actually went met with your expectations for how you swung the racquet.

If you hit the ball solidly and the ball didn't go where you expected it to, then you alter your mechanics. If you hit the ball solidly and it went where you expected it to, then do the same thing again. If you didn't hit the ball solidly, then that shot gives you no accurate information as to what might happen if you did hit it solidly.

If you hit the ball and it feels good, where did the ball go? Feel is useless without the visual information, and then of only limited use as a feedback mechanism.

Well, let me take that back a bit. People that think feel is important do give me one big weapon. I can say "Boy, the ball sure feels different today" and they'll be so concerned about the feel of the shot that it's worth at least a game a set to me as they obsess over it!

vkartikv
01-24-2006, 04:02 PM
vkartikv, ask yourself the question of what does this feel do for you? By the time your brain registers the impact of the ball, it's long gone from your strings. There's no way that feel can alter the shot you just made, and if you were to blindfold yourself, feel wouldn't have any way of telling you if the shot you just hit went low, high, left, right, in the court, or out of the court - your eyes will tell you that. Feel only tells you if you where you hit the ball on the stringbed, which really is only important for that one piece of information and using it to help you determine if where the ball actually went met with your expectations for how you swung the racquet.

If you hit the ball solidly and the ball didn't go where you expected it to, then you alter your mechanics. If you hit the ball solidly and it went where you expected it to, then do the same thing again. If you didn't hit the ball solidly, then that shot gives you no accurate information as to what might happen if you did hit it solidly.

If you hit the ball and it feels good, where did the ball go? Feel is useless without the visual information, and then of only limited use as a feedback mechanism.


It was implied that I was getting the balls to land where I wanted them to. Feel would be the last thing on my mind if I was not able to place the ball where I wanted.

str33t
01-24-2006, 04:50 PM
having "feel" is being comfortable with your racquet

NoBadMojo
01-24-2006, 04:58 PM
Feel is also derived by quality..How thoughtful the frame has been engineered and how much of the good stuff (graphite) goes into the layup vs filler and binders. Some racquets feel like graphite and others feel like plastic. Feel is very important to some and virtually meaningless to others based upon a number of factors.

vkartikv
01-24-2006, 04:59 PM
Feel is also derived by quality..How thoughtful the frame has been engineered and how much of the good stuff (graphite) goes into the layup vs filler and binders. Some racquets feel like graphite and others feel like plastic. Feel is very important to some and virtually meaningless to others based upon a number of factors.

Was waiting to hear your take on this, NBM!!

louis netman
01-24-2006, 09:45 PM
Feel is what makes you continue in the game. The racket's feel gives you the desire to keep wanting to strike the ball, day in & day out. It's the satisfaction one derives from striking that ball on groundies, serving, volleying, doing whatever it is you do on the court.... Whether you like "raw" feel, "string-bed" feel or "muted" feel, they are all types of "feel" nonetheless.... it's whatever turns you on!!!

Deuce
01-24-2006, 11:44 PM
Feel is what makes you continue in the game. The racket's feel gives you the desire to keep wanting to strike the ball, day in & day out. It's the satisfaction one derives from striking that ball on groundies, serving, volleying, doing whatever it is you do on the court.... Whether you like "raw" feel, "string-bed" feel or "muted" feel, they are all types of "feel" nonetheless.... it's whatever turns you on!!!

Yeah.

I think the definition of 'feel' is quite similar among those of us who grew up with the early graphite frames of the 80s. Those racquets were extremely comfortable - much more so than today's frames.

I know the kind of feel I like. I know after 5 hits (or less) if I'll like a racquet or not. While I can still play and hit most of my shots with a racquet whose feel I hate, I get much more enjoyment from the game when playing with a racquet whose feel I love.

It's like cars - you like the feel of some cars, and you hate the feel of other cars - but you can still drive them all.

louis netman
01-25-2006, 08:15 AM
Yeah.

I think the definition of 'feel' is quite similar among those of us who grew up with the early graphite frames of the 80s. Those racquets were extremely comfortable - much more so than today's frames.

I know the kind of feel I like. I know after 5 hits (or less) if I'll like a racquet or not. While I can still play and hit most of my shots with a racquet whose feel I hate, I get much more enjoyment from the game when playing with a racquet whose feel I love.

It's like cars - you like the feel of some cars, and you hate the feel of other cars - but you can still drive them all.

Unfortunately, 5 hits or less hasn't happened to me since the eighties. Back then, I could demo a new frame and say "YES!" after about 5 hits. I'm worried that it will never happen again :-( Very good point also about being able to hit all your shots with frames whose feel you hate. To comment on that, I play more of an impact game with a stick whose feel I hate, however, I eventually had to put it down due to the fact that I get much less satisfaction from my efforts...

Midlife crisis
01-25-2006, 09:50 PM
It was implied that I was getting the balls to land where I wanted them to. Feel would be the last thing on my mind if I was not able to place the ball where I wanted.

So, if the ball is landing where you think it will land, and your brain can only experience the feel of the racquet impacting the ball well after the ball has left the strings, what use is good "feel" in a racquet?

chip
01-26-2006, 08:02 AM
To me, feel would indicate the racket being an extension of your hand. Feel to me tranlates into control. If I can "feel" it, I have a better chance to control it. My experieince is feel is both a combination of racket material and string.

Brad Smith
01-26-2006, 10:08 AM
I know the kind of feel I like. I know after 5 hits (or less) if I'll like a racquet or not. While I can still play and hit most of my shots with a racquet whose feel I hate, I get much more enjoyment from the game when playing with a racquet whose feel I love.

My sentiments exactly. I like wood bats more than the aluminum/ceramic things they have now. I can hit better with the new ones but I don't like to. I like keyboards with heavy keys that I can pound on and can't stand cheap laptop keyboards. I'm more of a "punch" typer than a "touch" typer. I can use any keyboard you put in front of me, but I'll certainly enjoy one I can pound a lot more.

Ripper
01-26-2006, 10:21 AM
My sentiments exactly. I like wood bats more than the aluminum/ceramic things they have now. I can hit better with the new ones but I don't like to. I like keyboards with heavy keys that I can pound on and can't stand cheap laptop keyboards. I'm more of a "punch" typer than a "touch" typer. I can use any keyboard you put in front of me, but I'll certainly enjoy one I can pound a lot more.

Wao. Never thought there could be computer forums out there with "what keyboard has the most feel" kind of threads. Then, why not? :)

Ronaldo
01-26-2006, 10:22 AM
Racquet with the greatest raw 'feel' IMHO is the PSC 6.1 95. Never quite understood why but even the ps 6.0 85 pales in 'feel'.

NXG-Tecnifibre
01-26-2006, 10:37 AM
Definately not the NXG or anything with AIR handle!

stevewcosta
01-26-2006, 11:13 AM
Feel vs no/bad feel = 80's graphite vs current craphite