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Warriorroger
01-29-2006, 04:00 AM
Wow. Just saw Roger's speech. What a great guy he is. To be that succesful and good and still appreciate everything that much. I loved the way he acted towards tennislegend Rod Laver. He hugged with great respect.

This speech has made me a big fan of Roger Federer. He is a role model as a tennisplayer, but also as a person.

Matthew
01-29-2006, 04:09 AM
Make sure you add a spoiler to the title of this thread ASAP. Remeber that many people have not seen this match, and you wouldn't wanna ruin a great one!

Federer's outpour of emotion when he accepted the trophy from Rod Laver was an absolutely incredible moment. To see so much emotion from a man who, after six Grand Slam titles you think he would be use to giving these speeches, is just awesome. It just proves that with every title he wins, each one means more and more to him. I mean, Roger really didn't know what to say! :D What a great champion.

mucat
01-29-2006, 04:10 AM
It is his seventh major already and he still appreciates it like the first time.

austro
01-29-2006, 04:11 AM
But honestly, the crying? Can't he keep control over himself for a little longer? I know everyone will bash me for that but I think he is not a little kid anymore...

Agree with the rest on rolemodel and all that, for those who need one.

Michael Haller
01-29-2006, 04:11 AM
Wow. Just saw Roger's speech. What a great guy he is. To be that succesful and good and still appreciate everything that much. I loved the way he acted towards tennislegend Rod Laver. He hugged with great respect.

This speech has made me a big fan of Roger Federer. He is a role model as a tennisplayer, but also as a person.


MADE you a fan?

And I though "Warriorroger" had something to do with "ROGER Federer" ....

Michael Haller
01-29-2006, 04:13 AM
But honestly, the crying? Can't he keep control over himself for a little longer? I know everyone will bash me for that but I think he is not a little kid anymore...

Agree with the rest on rolemodel and all that, for those who need one.


Yes, this crying was a little bit childish.
But Roger is a great person nevertheless ....

austro
01-29-2006, 04:13 AM
Make sure you add a spoiler to the title of this thread ASAP. Remeber that many people have not seen this match, and you wouldn't wanna ruin a great one!

Federer's outpour of emotion when he accepted the trophy from Rod Laver was an absolutely incredible moment. To see so much emotion from a man who, after six Grand Slam titles you think he would be use to giving these speeches, is just awesome. It just proves that with every title he wins, each one means more and more to him. I mean, Roger really didn't know what to say! :D What a great champion.


He is a great champion for not knowing what to say?? Come on guys, let's get back to earth!

I think what people like when they see this sort of emotion is that it reminds them that even a champion is just an ordinary person at heart and they take some comfort in that. But how much grander if he could actually control his emotions!

ssuHeartsRivald
01-29-2006, 04:14 AM
yeah, i agreed.
i was touched when he was crying. He is a real champion and best personality i've ever seen in tennis.
Congratulations for Federer for 7th GS title.

Warriorroger
01-29-2006, 04:22 AM
MADE you a fan?

And I though "Warriorroger" had something to do with "ROGER Federer" ....

My own name is Roger.

mucat
01-29-2006, 04:26 AM
The crying shows everything , how much he appreciates the game, how much he appreciates Rod Laver handing him the trophy, how hard he works, how much he sacrifices, how much the game of tennis means to him, etc.

Nothing childish about it, ...guys, it is not a MTV award.

Warriorroger
01-29-2006, 04:28 AM
Make sure you add a spoiler to the title of this thread ASAP. Remeber that many people have not seen this match, and you wouldn't wanna ruin a great one!

Federer's outpour of emotion when he accepted the trophy from Rod Laver was an absolutely incredible moment. To see so much emotion from a man who, after six Grand Slam titles you think he would be use to giving these speeches, is just awesome. It just proves that with every title he wins, each one means more and more to him. I mean, Roger really didn't know what to say! :D What a great champion.

Forgot to do the spoiler thing, and I don't know how to do it when the thread is already posted.

Docalex007
01-29-2006, 04:29 AM
He is a great champion for not knowing what to say?? Come on guys, let's get back to earth!

I think what people like when they see this sort of emotion is that it reminds them that even a champion is just an ordinary person at heart and they take some comfort in that. But how much grander if he could actually control his emotions!

Do you know what it is like to stand there on that stage and accept a Grand Slam trophy from a tennis legend? I didn't think so.

Federer being emotional like that is great to see in a human. Some share their emotions in different ways. Some joke around and smile because they've just won....others cry. It is not childish - it is human nature.

Yours!05
01-29-2006, 04:29 AM
Make sure you add a spoiler to the title of this thread ASAP. Remeber that many people have not seen this match, and you wouldn't wanna ruin a great one!You can't add them, but most of the OPs who don't put spoiler know that.

Warriorroger
01-29-2006, 04:30 AM
You can't add them, but most of the OPs who don't put spoiler know that.

What's an OP, is it occassional poster?

Nalbandian
01-29-2006, 04:31 AM
My own name is Roger.

Your name is Gunther right?

Tennis_Fan_109
01-29-2006, 04:37 AM
[QUOTE=Docalex007]Do you know what it is like to stand there on that stage and accept a Grand Slam trophy from a tennis legend? I didn't think so.

No. I dont. BUT HE DOES! HE DOES x6!!! Crying the first time- ok. But he cried the next Wimbledon as well, and by know he's a grown man... I can't put him in the same league as Sampras if he's going to be crying after each one.

Warriorroger
01-29-2006, 04:44 AM
[quote=Docalex007]Do you know what it is like to stand there on that stage and accept a Grand Slam trophy from a tennis legend? I didn't think so.

No. I dont. BUT HE DOES! HE DOES x6!!! Crying the first time- ok. But he cried the next Wimbledon as well, and by know he's a grown man... I can't put him in the same league as Sampras if he's going to be crying after each one.

What has grown man got to do with it. I think it is a very good sign, when someone that good, rich, fortunate, sincerly appreciates the fact that he won a Grand Slam title. It makes him more human. You can't compare Roger to Pete as a person. As tennisplayers they are both great, but If I would be lying wounded in the street, I wouldn't want a person like Pete to help me, but rather a warm person like Federer. Maybe the exampel is a bit off, but I can't see why peope want to critize Federer. He is a great guy.

mucat
01-29-2006, 04:48 AM
Do you know what it is like to stand there on that stage and accept a Grand Slam trophy from a tennis legend? I didn't think so.

No. I dont. BUT HE DOES! HE DOES x6!!! Crying the first time- ok. But he cried the next Wimbledon as well, and by know he's a grown man... I can't put him in the same league as Sampras if he's going to be crying after each one.

Thats what makes him different from Sampras, he still appreciates it like the first time. And it is obvious he is very emotional about Rod Laver doing the trophy presentation and he respects Rod Laver a lot. He hugged Rob Laver twice!! He is like a kid receiving candies.

alan-n
01-29-2006, 04:48 AM
Its funny to hear ppl criticize Federer over his "crying" as if its babyish. If you think you're bigger man than Federer or mentally tougher than him, than you better be packing some major accomplishments.... because all it sounds like is you've got some "hate" issues.

Rod Laver is presenting the championship trophy, Federer actually has RESPECT for people (is that a tough concept to understand?). He's human and overcome with emotion. If you think you're a bigger man than Federer, please prove it.

If Rod Laver weren't presenting the trophy, than Federer would have carried out a speech that you would have expected to hear. Its good to see how much someone values and respects their peers. Boy thats such an odd concept for some people.

swedechris
01-29-2006, 04:49 AM
just goes to show we are all human ..champs or not.. :)
sampras was no exception .. he cried adn was moved many times in his career.. like when playing agassi or maybe it was courier ..and thought of his coach = gullikson , who was ill..

also when he retired and when he won that last us open he was clearly cleary moved.. and i think he will be crying again if fed surpasses his records.. and i guess so will fed the way the human mind works ..then now and in the future..:)!!


ps.. if you cant cry .. you got a problem .. just like if you cant laugh..

same thing basically

idle_fire
01-29-2006, 04:54 AM
you see, Tennis Fan 109's threads just about to blame all the way for the Federer's tears. what's up man???
There is nothing wrong to cry when you get trophy, there's no matter it's the first or seventh, the point is IT IS GRAND SLAM...
DAMN, TF 109 is anti-Federer, at least give Roger congrats....or you be angry because no US player in QF..

poor poor

Docalex007
01-29-2006, 04:55 AM
What has grown man got to do with it. I think it is a very good sign, when someone that good, rich, fortunate, sincerly appreciates the fact that he won a Grand Slam title. It makes him more human. You can't compare Roger to Pete as a person. As tennisplayers they are both great, but If I would be lying wounded in the street, I wouldn't want a person like Pete to help me, but rather a warm person like Federer. Maybe the exampel is a bit off, but I can't see why peope want to critize Federer. He is a great guy.

Be careful how you quote people....as you combined my quote with someone else's and stamped my name on it.

Docalex007
01-29-2006, 04:56 AM
Thats what makes him different from Sampras, he still appreciates it like the first time. And it is obvious he is very emotional about Rod Laver doing the trophy presentation and he respects Rod Laver a lot. He hugged Rob Laver twice!! He is like a kid receiving candies.

You too....observe how you quote people please.

35ft6
01-29-2006, 04:57 AM
But honestly, the crying? Can't he keep control over himself for a little longer? I know everyone will bash me for that but I think he is not a little kid anymore... I think it's childish for a person to suppress a genuine emotion. Stoicism is highly overrated IMO. Give me sincere tears over contrived indifference any day. It's sad that a lot of people have to get a terminal disease before they stop taking everything for granted and start realizing that life is full of many wonderful moments.

Nalbandian
01-29-2006, 05:00 AM
I think it's childish for a person to suppress a genuine emotion. Stoicism is highly overrated IMO. Give me sincere tears over contrived indifference any day.

I agree. Stoicism is a sign of insecurity and lack of social skills.

Warriorroger
01-29-2006, 05:02 AM
Be careful how you quote people....as you combined my quote with someone else's and stamped my name on it.

You're right. It wasn't your quote, the one I intended has messed up the quote things, that's why your name was on it. Sorry!

Michael Haller
01-29-2006, 05:02 AM
Do you know what it is like to stand there on that stage and accept a Grand Slam trophy from a tennis legend? I didn't think so.

No. I dont. BUT HE DOES! HE DOES x6!!! Crying the first time- ok. But he cried the next Wimbledon as well, and by know he's a grown man... I can't put him in the same league as Sampras if he's going to be crying after each one.

Well, Graf cried after her 22nd slam ....

Keifers
01-29-2006, 05:02 AM
To the members here who have criticised Roger's crying, I wish for you at least one experience in your life that gives you such joy and sense of accomplishment and gratitude that you will be moved to tears -- and will not even try to stop yourself from crying.

Warriorroger
01-29-2006, 05:07 AM
To the members here who have criticised Roger's crying, I wish for you at least one experience in your life that gives you such joy and sense of accomplishment and gratitude that you will be moved to tears -- and will not even try to stop yourself from crying.

Well said. I mean where else do you get a champion like him. Some call me a Steffi fanatic (I do love her game), but when she won The Grandslam, she looked like she just got beaten up. Roger is such a sincere sweet person. In the Netherlands we have these million getting (not making) soccer players, most of them are arrogant, ignorant and stupid. Roger gave us for the world to see what class is. I wish him the Grand Slam!!

Docalex007
01-29-2006, 05:07 AM
Well, Graf cried after her 22nd slam ....

Jesus man, realize what you just did! You combined two people's quotes! DAMN!

Warriorroger
01-29-2006, 05:09 AM
Well said. I mean where else do you get a champion like him. Some call me a Steffi fanatic (I do love her game), but when she won The Grandslam, she looked like she just got beaten up. Roger is such a sincere sweet person. In the Netherlands we have these million getting (not making) soccer players, most of them are arrogant, ignorant and stupid. Roger gave us for the world to see what class is. I wish him the Grand Slam!!

Ignore the msn battles.

Nalbandian
01-29-2006, 05:12 AM
Ignore the msn battles.

Answering your own post? Forgot to switch to you other screename Warriorpsycho? LMAO

35ft6
01-29-2006, 05:12 AM
I agree. Stoicism is a sign of insecurity and lack of social skills.In my corniest post yet, I'm going to cite an old Garth Brooks song, which sums up my feelings quite nicely.We call them cool
Those hearts that have no scars to show
The ones that never do let go
And risk the tables being turned

We call them fools
Who have to dance within the flame
Who chance the sorrow and the shame
That always come with getting burned

But you got to be tough when consumed by desire
'Cause it's not enough just to stand outside the fire

We call them strong
Those who can face this world alone
Who seem to get by on their own
Those who will never take the fall

We call them weak
Who are unable to resist
The slightest chance love might exist
And for that forsake it all

They're so hell bent on giving, walking a wire
Convinced it's not living if you stand outside the fire

Chorus:
Standing outside the fire
Standing outside the fire
Life is not tried, it is merely survived
If you're standing outside the fire

There's this love that is burning
Deep in my soul
Constantly yearning to get out of control
Wanting to fly higher and higher
I can't abide
standing outside the fire. I think stoicism IS a sign of strength sometimes. Like say when a father refuses to cry in front of his sick daughter because he knows it will only amplify her panic. And I hate it when people whine. But I also agree with Nalbandian that stoicism is also a mask for cowards who are afraid of showing emotion.

Nalbandian
01-29-2006, 05:15 AM
Well, Graf cried after her 22nd slam ....

I bet Gunther cried too because he really got his WISH...

tenalyser
01-29-2006, 05:18 AM
Some of you guys will never stop surprising me, Do you know how hard it is to win 7 out of 7 Slam finals or to play in front of 30 000 people and most of them rooting for the underdog. Coming from a injury and a tough lost in the TMC final, criticized by journalist because you don't win so easily as normal. Playing in front of a "The tennis legend" and the parents of your deceased coach. Well if you haven't experience those things then please stop bashing and instead admire tennis at his finest :D

Warriorroger
01-29-2006, 05:18 AM
In my corniest post yet, I'm going to cite an old Garth Brooks song, which sums up my feelings quite nicely. I think stoicism IS a sign of strength sometimes. Like say when a father refuses to cry in front of his sick daughter because he knows it will only amplify her panic. And I hate it when people whine. But I also agree with Nalbandian that stoicism is also a mask for cowards who are afraid of showing emotion.

Just dowloaded the song, I am curious.

Turning Pro
01-29-2006, 05:19 AM
to be honest,i have now got more respect for fed.

if i was up there i would do the same.

Warriorroger
01-29-2006, 05:19 AM
Some of you guys will never stop surprising me, Do you know how hard it is to win 7 out of 7 Slam finals or to play in front of 30 000 people and most of them rooting for the underdog. Coming from a injury and a tough lost in the TMC final, criticized by journalist because you don't win so easily as normal. Playing in front of a "The tennis legend" and the parents of your deceased coach. Well if you haven't experience those things then please stop bashing and instead admire tennis at his finest :D

Didn't know about the family of his deceased coach. Thanks tenalyser for posting.

crazylevity
01-29-2006, 05:25 AM
Yes indeed. It was more emotional than most of his other Slam wins. I remember him shedding a few tears at last years Wimby and USO wins, but this kind of outright crying is unusual.

"Crying x6" is quite inaccurate an observation, with all due respect.

chess9
01-29-2006, 05:26 AM
Why is crying childish? I think RF showed he is a human being with feelings and that can't ever be wrong. He worked very hard for that title, wanted it, and achieved it, plus he got the trophy from possibly the greatest tennis player pound for pound who ever lived.

Real men cry and it's ok.

-Robert
________
WEED (http://wwweed.com/)

35ft6
01-29-2006, 05:27 AM
Just dowloaded the song, I am curious. I think downloading songs is wrong, but also check out The Dance and Unanswered Prayers, also by Garth Brooks. I'm not a big country music fan per se, but I'm a big fan of the song craft that goes into country lyrics. It's not like a lot of pop songs which are 1) like straight from a 12 yo's diary, or 2) a guy saying "you're hot, I want to hook up with you" over and over. Country lyrics will tell an entire coherent story and/or explore an idea pretty thoroughly, like an essay set to music (tell them what you're going to tell them... tell them... tell them what you just told them).

Yeah, so Garth Brooks was on fire on that album.

vicnan
01-29-2006, 05:30 AM
Well said. I mean where else do you get a champion like him. ... Roger is such a sincere sweet person. In the Netherlands we have these million getting (not making) soccer players, most of them are arrogant, ignorant and stupid. Roger gave us for the world to see what class is. I wish him the Grand Slam!!

Roger is miles apart from, e.g., a certain TW in golf who, imo, is equally dominant in his sport but not as classy or gracious. (Even he was overcome by emotion after winning the T-slam.) I think it is a combination of factors: winning AO after losing it so painfully last year, having overcome his late 2005 injury, coming from a set and a break behind, and of course the Laver factor. It is not everyday you root for and respect a person more after each win (NYY, anyone?). Roger rocks!

Warriorroger
01-29-2006, 05:31 AM
http://www2.sfdrs.ch/piccache/webtool/data/pics/sportx/te_federer_ausopen_traenen__w281_h_m.jpg
The Champion

ErwinFromParis
01-29-2006, 05:35 AM
what surprise me more and more w/ Fed it's how sensitive the guy is actually, and thus, how strong he contains it during match money times... Definitively a man from nowhere.

Congratulation Roger you re the champion of the century

Also big respect to Baghdatis who still stand on the ship despite all. And how refreshing it is to see new balls arriving with such noble values.

This match was one of that kind makes me love tennis and watch games...

Michael Haller
01-29-2006, 05:36 AM
Well said. I mean where else do you get a champion like him. Some call me a Steffi fanatic (I do love her game), but when she iwon The Grandslam, she looked like she just got beaten up. ...

That's a myth. I watched the USO 88 final last month. Graf had a wonderful smile on her face ..

I prefer this a thousands times over dancing around the court like Venus or sinking to your knees a la Borg.

Nalbandian
01-29-2006, 05:39 AM
That's a myth. I watched the USO 88 final last month. Graf had a wonderful smile on her face ..

I prefer this a thousands times over dancing around the court like Venus or sinking to your knees a la Borg.

Total BS Gunther Pike!!! Graf was never a warm champion. She was often perceived as dark, cold and aloof.

Lee
01-29-2006, 05:40 AM
Alex, looks like I lost my bet. I will pay for the meal when we meet up.

Warriorroger
01-29-2006, 05:42 AM
That's a myth. I watched the USO 88 final last month. Graf had a wonderful smile on her face ..

I prefer this a thousands times over dancing around the court like Venus or sinking to your knees a la Borg.

Nalbandian
01-29-2006, 05:46 AM
That's the difference between a fan and a psycho.

Coming from a psycho fan himself. How hilarious! LMAO

slice bh compliment
01-29-2006, 06:30 AM
Some of you guys will never stop surprising me, Do you know how hard it is to win 7 out of 7 Slam finals or to play in front of 30 000 people and most of them rooting for the underdog. Coming from a injury and a tough lost in the TMC final, criticized by journalist because you don't win so easily as normal. Playing in front of a "The tennis legend" and the parents of your deceased coach. .....................

Yes. Well put.

I think it was humility.
Federer was completely humbled by it all.

Did you guys read where Marco said he cried when Federer cried at the '03 Wimbledon trophy presentation?

devila
01-29-2006, 06:58 AM
It's a joke to compare Tiger Woods to Federer. They both want adoration at the expense of opponents. They can't speak eloquently and try too hard to be funny, down to earth and modest.

Federer complimented Marcos' team and then, praised his team right after, so he could hear the Fed fan applause.

Yet, the arrogant body language revealed that he stopped himself before blurting, "I'm so great and beautiful." To him, he deserved more respect than opponents. He cried at Wimbledon, but there, he couldn't stop saying,
"I'm beautiful."

He says he cried when the coach's parents watched the match. The real reason is, he cried because he can get more favoritism and *** kissing.

He tried to hide arrogant emotions and knew the competition wasn't as good as competition 20 years ago. A legend after playing chumps.

He still yelled rude "come ons" after opponents' unforced errors.
On ESPN, Federer admitted that before 2005, he called his opponent an idiot because he didn't beat him.

legolas
01-29-2006, 08:01 AM
It is his seventh major already and he still appreciates it like the first time.
yeah man

austro
01-29-2006, 08:36 AM
Do you know what it is like to stand there on that stage and accept a Grand Slam trophy from a tennis legend? I didn't think so.

Federer being emotional like that is great to see in a human. Some share their emotions in different ways. Some joke around and smile because they've just won....others cry. It is not childish - it is human nature.

No I don't, not having been there. Do you?

But I don't think it is childish. It is child-like.

xanctus
01-29-2006, 08:45 AM
Yeah...Federer is pretty modest guy in my opinion. It was a good thing for him to win this OZ even though I was cheering Marcos. But again, I have never hated Roger since the first time I saw him playing tennis in pro level. :D

drp2345
01-29-2006, 09:13 AM
He is a great champion for not knowing what to say?? Come on guys, let's get back to earth!

I think what people like when they see this sort of emotion is that it reminds them that even a champion is just an ordinary person at heart and they take some comfort in that. But how much grander if he could actually control his emotions!


NOOOOOOOOOO.... its not that he is a champion because he doesnt know what to say, its that hes so joyed by the situation because he isn't taking it for granted and the fact that he doesnt know what to say proves how emotional he was which proves how seriously he took it which proves that he is a champion. I don't have much time right now, so hopefully that can explain it.

drp2345
01-29-2006, 09:14 AM
HAHA....wow...I didn't realize how many pages there were to this thread so if anyone had already responded to AUSTRO's qoute, then lo siento.

West Coast Ace
01-29-2006, 09:26 AM
It's a joke to compare Tiger Woods to Federer. They both want adoration at the expense of opponents. They can't speak eloquently and try too hard to be funny, down to earth and modest.

Federer complimented Marcos' team and then, praised his team right after, so he could hear the Fed fan applause.

Yet, the arrogant body language revealed that he stopped himself before blurting, "I'm so great and beautiful." To him, he deserved more respect than opponents. He cried at Wimbledon, but there, he couldn't stop saying,
"I'm beautiful."

He says he cried when the coach's parents watched the match. The real reason is, he cried because he can get more favoritism and *** kissing.

He tried to hide arrogant emotions and knew the competition wasn't as good as competition 20 years ago. A legend after playing chumps.

He still yelled rude "come ons" after opponents' unforced errors.
On ESPN, Federer admitted that before 2005, he called his opponent an idiot because he didn't beat him.Devlia, I have to give you credit. Ever time I think you can't outdo yourself and come up with any more bitter, non-sensical rants - you deliver!

'Arrogant Body Language' - classic.

One thing we do agree with is the fact that Fed shouldn't be compared to Tiger Woods. Tiger doesn't say anything controversial because he's been coached very well by Michael Jordan: "don't say ANYTHING that could endanger your endorsement cash." I love Jim Rome playing this Tiger quote over and over, "I like the course. I like my swing. I like my chances."

If there were a Bitterness and Loony Ranting Hall of Fame, you'd go in on the first ballot.

pound cat
01-29-2006, 09:39 AM
Yes. Well put.

I think it was humility.
Federer was completely humbled by it all.

Did you guys read where Marco said he cried when Federer cried at the '03 Wimbledon trophy presentation?

Marcos was crying while Federer was crying during his speech. This ceremony will be remembered and showed the sport tennis at it's very best. I haven't seen this display of real emotion in any other sport.

It was a great match ...from beginning to end.

Warriorroger
01-29-2006, 11:12 AM
Marcos was crying while Federer was crying during his speech. This ceremony will be remembered and showed the sport tennis at it's very best. I haven't seen this display of real emotion in any other sport.

It was a great match ...from beginning to end.

Well said! Let's leave it at that.

skip1969
01-29-2006, 12:42 PM
and let's hope some of you tough, macho 'real' men/boys don't lose it one day and start bawling when your wife gives birth to your first child. or you walk your daughter down the aisle and give her away on her wedding day (if you're ever that lucky).

wouldn't want you to lose too many cool points.

pound cat
01-29-2006, 12:49 PM
[QUOTE=skip1969]and let's hope some of you tough, macho 'real' men/boys don't lose it one day and start balling when your wife gives birth to your first child

Errr....bawling I think/hope you meant. LOL

Other than that, I agree with you ..

skip1969
01-29-2006, 12:52 PM
LOL
how's that for first post of the day? oops. sorry, i stand corrected. and thank you.

alexmath2
01-29-2006, 01:06 PM
and let's hope some of you tough, macho 'real' men/boys don't lose it one day and start bawling when your wife gives birth to your first child. or you walk your daughter down the aisle and give her away on her wedding day (if you're ever that lucky).

wouldn't want you to lose too many cool points.

There are appropriate times to cry and inappropriate ones. The birth of your child, the loss of a loved one, and the wedding of your children all seem apropriate to me and I would think to most people. I do think it is a little weird to cry after winning a tennis match. At the very least suck it up and go cry in the lockeroom. It is part of the feminization of this culture, where we think it is ok to go on crying in public and emoting to complete strangers. There is something dignified about keeping a stiff upper lip in my opinon.

bigkat81
01-29-2006, 01:16 PM
a agree w/ 35ft6, there are times when it is appropriate to
not show emotion. but there is a purpose, it isn't just holding
back b/c of trying to be manly, cool, "appropriate", etc.

for those of you who choose to live a life of preconceived
appropriateness and constipated emotions, just as an
experiment, try allowing yourself to feel your emotions
more often and see what happens.

alienhamster
01-29-2006, 01:19 PM
While the title of this thread makes me want to projectile vomit, I was really moved by Fed's emotional reaction at the podium. He really does love the game--and its history.

But I was definitely upset that there was no stuffed kangaroo in the trophy cup.

Warriorroger
01-29-2006, 01:26 PM
While the title of this thread makes me want to projectile vomit, I was really moved by Fed's emotional reaction at the podium. He really does love the game--and its history.

But I was definitely upset that there was no stuffed kangaroo in the trophy cup.


That's because it was up your a s s, don't be cruel to my thread;)

iamtheavalanche
01-29-2006, 01:42 PM
you know...i'm sure i would have been crying during federer's speech too.


BUT, OH WAIT!!!!!!!

ESPN decided it would be hilarious to not show it and show women's indoor track instead!!!!!!

Yours!05
01-29-2006, 01:44 PM
Devlia, I have to give you credit. Ever time I think you can't outdo yourself and come up with any more bitter, non-sensical rants - you deliver!
If there were a Bitterness and Loony Ranting Hall of Fame, you'd go in on the first ballot.First ballot is already full to bursting. Devila is the devil we know...At least he/she is one person (can't see any AASCI characters there - today), and doesn't exist to manipulate the unwary for personal satisfaction. Therefore, still on my Christmas Card List. ;)

FuriousYellow
01-29-2006, 01:50 PM
I was a little surprised by Roger's emotional reaction as well. You'd think this would be matter of fact to him by now with all the tournaments he's won. I can't imaging what his reaction will be if he wins the French.

dennis10is
01-29-2006, 01:50 PM
[QUOTE=skip1969]and let's hope some of you tough, macho 'real' men/boys don't lose it one day and start balling when your wife gives birth to your first child

Errr....bawling I think/hope you meant. LOL

Other than that, I agree with you ..


Wrong!! Real men don't cry if something sad or happy happens to their family. They can only cry, when other real men, loses in the Super Bowl, NBA Championship, or World Series. After all, these men, whom they don't know, represent their vacarious dreams of glory, and there is nothing more glorious then professional team sports play by strangers.

Birth of your child, death of your parents, mass graves from genocide are insignificant compare to the power of the Super Bowl (spoken in Darth Vader's voice). If a man wants to cry he can put on Rudy, Hossiers, The Natural, one of many real man approved sports tear jerkers.

Yours!05
01-29-2006, 01:56 PM
Wrong!! Real men don't cry if something sad or happy happens to their family. They can only cry, when other real men, loses in the Super Bowl, NBA Championship, or World Series. After all, these men, whom they don't know, represent their vacarious dreams of glory, and there is nothing more glorious then professional team sports play by strangers.

Birth of your child, death of your parents, mass graves from genocide are insignificant compare to the power of the Super Bowl (spoken in Darth Vader's voice). If a man wants to cry he can put on Rudy, Hossiers, The Natural, one of many real man approved sports tear jerkers.Funny man, Dennis:D

vicnan
01-29-2006, 01:57 PM
[QUOTE=pound cat]


Wrong!! Real men don't cry if something sad or happy happens to their family. They can only cry, when other real men, loses in the Super Bowl, NBA Championship, or World Series. After all, these men, whom they don't know, represent their vacarious dreams of glory, and there is nothing more glorious then professional team sports play by strangers.

Birth of your child, death of your parents, mass graves from genocide are insignificant compare to the power of the Super Bowl (spoken in Darth Vader's voice). If a man wants to cry he can put on Rudy, Hossiers, The Natural, one of many real man approved sports tear jerkers.

lol!

skip1969
01-29-2006, 01:58 PM
But I was definitely upset that there was no stuffed kangaroo in the trophy cup.

straight up. give the man his roo!

pound cat
01-29-2006, 02:14 PM
Oh for god's sake. Of course Federer would cry at this moment....another Slam, an equally emotional opponent (yes, vibes do go over the net) , a tennis icon, Laver, present for the match, an intense match, culmination of years of nothing but goal oriented tennis by Federer.

What the this stiff upper lip nonsense? That went out with gaiters and The Good Queen.

Loosen up folks..emote...cry...laugh..weep... That's what life is. Emotion and feeling. Lucky are those who live live in all aspects.

Pity for those who don't .

Never thought I could say/feel this...but, GO ROGER...you're great!!

And you too Marcos. Best Slam ever.

Mr.Federer
01-29-2006, 02:29 PM
It sucks, I wanted to see that speech but TSN just skipped putting some poker on TV...

pound cat
01-29-2006, 02:36 PM
Tape it LIVE where possible.......

Shabazza
01-29-2006, 02:43 PM
anything I could add was already said in this thread...
Two great sportsmen showing how much tennis means to them.
Like someone said before, truly a great match form the beginning...to the end...and tennis was the winner tonight!

pound cat
01-29-2006, 02:53 PM
[QUOTE=Shabazza]anything I could add was already said in this thread...
Two great sportsmen showing how much tennis means to them.
Like someone said before, truly a great match form the beginning...to the end...and tennis was the winner tonight![/QUOTE

You said it all...........in a nutshell

alienhamster
01-29-2006, 02:54 PM
That's because it was up your a s s, don't be cruel to my thread;) Hey! I didn't mean that as a personal attack, promise. You have to admit the thread title is kinda corny. Not exactly "Roger: A True American Hero," but definitely in that direction.

The sentiment of the thread is great; the sentimentality of the title wasn't so much.

pound cat
01-29-2006, 03:09 PM
Hey! I didn't mean that as a personal attack, promise. You have to admit the thread title is kinda corny.

The sentiment of the thread is great; the sentimentality of the title wasn't so much.

I don't
know about that. Maybe he is at heart a corny kind of guy. He comes from a town in Switzerland and owns a cow. What could be cornier than that?

Have we seen a new Roger in his 2006 AO speech?

Shabazza
01-29-2006, 03:10 PM
Have we seen a new Roger in his 2006 AO speech?
Nope, but the real one!

pound cat
01-29-2006, 03:34 PM
I think you're right..isn't it great?

35ft6
01-29-2006, 03:36 PM
[QUOTE=skip1969]and let's hope some of you tough, macho 'real' men/boys don't lose it one day and start balling when your wife gives birth to your first child

Errr....bawling I think/hope you meant. LOL

Other than that, I agree with you .. He really could have meant balling. I have a friend who got so nervous when his wife was giving birth that he left the delivery room to go play basketball. :( Just kidding.

I hope it's only a matter of time before somebody uploads Federer's acceptance speech to Google Video or Youtube.com.

skip1969
01-29-2006, 03:42 PM
LOL. my spelling ain't so good when i first turn on the laptop.

mucat
01-29-2006, 03:51 PM
You too....observe how you quote people please.


Original post
"[quote=Docalex007]Do you know what it is like to stand there on that stage and accept a Grand Slam trophy from a tennis legend? I didn't think so.

No. I dont. BUT HE DOES! HE DOES x6!!! Crying the first time- ok. But he cried the next Wimbledon as well, and by know he's a grown man... I can't put him in the same league as Sampras if he's going to be crying after each one."

Sorry, fell into Tennis_Fan_109's trap of tricky quote.

pound cat
01-29-2006, 04:01 PM
This was big time crying...from the federer heart...........Hey, he's human

35ft6
01-29-2006, 04:03 PM
From Marcos' post final interview:Q. Were you surprised by the emotion he showed out there?

MARCOS BAGHDATIS: Really, the first time ?? not the first time, but the first time he won Wimbledon, I was in front of my TV and I saw him cry, and I start crying so... I was in the tournament, I was in the future I remember in France. He was in the final. He won the final and he start crying.

Today when I saw him cry, I mean, I felt happy for him. He's a great man, I think. He is a great person. He shows a lot. He gives a lot to people, I think. It's just so emotional up there, you cannot control yourself. So I think I know what he's going through.

35ft6
01-29-2006, 04:04 PM
Q. What did your coach say at the end of the match?

MARCOS BAGHDATIS: He told me doesn't matter. I mean, he told me it's tough. He knows it's tough. But, I mean, it doesn't really matter because I'm 20 years old and he told me that I have a lot in front of me to do and it's not finish. After I start crying and he just told me, "Keep on crying." And that's all.

alexmath2
01-29-2006, 04:39 PM
Oh for god's sake. Of course Federer would cry at this moment....another Slam, an equally emotional opponent (yes, vibes do go over the net) , a tennis icon, Laver, present for the match, an intense match, culmination of years of nothing but goal oriented tennis by Federer.

What the this stiff upper lip nonsense? That went out with gaiters and The Good Queen.

Loosen up folks..emote...cry...laugh..weep... That's what life is. Emotion and feeling. Lucky are those who live live in all aspects.

Pity for those who don't .

Never thought I could say/feel this...but, GO ROGER...you're great!!

And you too Marcos. Best Slam ever.

Life is all about those emotions. When I have a bad day, I curse everybody around me. When I am sad, I cry like a baby even when it ruins other's days. If I want to talk to somebody, I do it even if I am in a movie theater. Emotions are great. Knowing when to express them are even better. The whole world doesn't have to know what you are feeling just because you are feeling something. Children show their emotions at all times. As we mature, we learn to express them appropriately

zorg
01-29-2006, 04:40 PM
I don't think it was childish like some say, because you have to remember the different cultures. Switzerland is not the U.S. so crying there might be more normal. In America men are "supposed" to never cry (why, I don't know...) but maybe in other countries they are just...what is the word...oh yes, normal.

vllockhart
01-29-2006, 04:42 PM
I teared up right along with Roger. The depth of his emotion was touching to say the least. I wasn't expecting it at all.

West Coast Ace
01-29-2006, 04:45 PM
... I can't put him in the same league as Sampras if he's going to be crying after each one."You're a REAL tennis fan!Glad you have your priorities straight.

So you'll ignore the fact that he can hit all the shots, not just a few like Sampras (Sampras' backhand and return of serve aren't even close to Fed's), and is doing this against bigger, more physically fit players and deeper fields? As the kiddies say today, 'whatever'...

devila
01-29-2006, 05:49 PM
[QUOTE=pound cat]


Wrong!! Real men don't cry if something sad or happy happens to their family. They can only cry, when other real men, loses in the Super Bowl, NBA Championship, or World Series. After all, these men, whom they don't know, represent their vacarious dreams of glory, and there is nothing more glorious then professional team sports play by strangers.

Birth of your child, death of your parents, mass graves from genocide are insignificant compare to the power of the Super Bowl (spoken in Darth Vader's voice). If a man wants to cry he can put on Rudy, Hossiers, The Natural, one of many real man approved sports tear jerkers.

LOL!!! These tennis fans are as bad as Tiger Woods' fans. No one else is a greater human being!

federerforever
01-29-2006, 05:50 PM
He is a true legend. But I still can't understand why his number one goal this year is to win Wimbledon instead of French Open. I mean he has won three Wimbledons already and zero French Opens. He must win French Open as fast as possible or else when he retires he will be known as another Pete Sampras and not as Roger Federer, the greatest ever.

156MPHserve
01-29-2006, 05:57 PM
I don't blame him... because this isn't really a surface that benefits him as much as Wimbledon and USO. Also he lost last year... probably been dreaming of redemption all year. The lost in the Masters Cup final made things worst because he's never lost in a final for SO long. He said that even in the semis against Kiefer he was getting nervous because he was so close. When Baghdatis had him broken a few times in the beginning, he must have felt quite uneasy because he's almost ALWAYS the front-runner. One of the only times he wasn't the front-runner is against Nadal, who just really IS better on clay. So when he was able to tough it out and win it with a big margin, it must have been so emotional.

Yours!05
01-29-2006, 06:00 PM
He is a true legend. But I still can't understand why his number one goal this year is to win Wimbledon instead of French Open. I mean he has won three Wimbledons already and zero French Opens. He must win French Open as fast as possible or else when he retires he will be known as another Pete Sampras and not as Roger Federer, the greatest ever.In another TV interview (not published) he said the AO and Wimbledon were the most important to him per se. This would be his "Tennis History" viewpoint.

West Coast Ace
01-29-2006, 06:00 PM
He is a true legend. But I still can't understand why his number one goal this year is to win Wimbledon instead of French Open. I mean he has won three Wimbledons already and zero French Opens. He must win French Open as fast as possible or else when he retires he will be known as another Pete Sampras and not as Roger Federer, the greatest ever.I agree. Think about this scenario: Fed (only) wins 12 Slams but does win the French to get the career Slam. I put him ahead of Sampras. But if he ends up with less and only has titles from same 3 Slams (AO, W, USO) that Sampras has then it would be hard to rank him ahead.

Could be a mental ploy not to put too much pressure on himself. His website says he's playing Monte Carlo, Rome, and Hamburg in preparation for the French.

opiate
01-29-2006, 07:29 PM
I can't help but chuckle a loud at an article by The Guardian, re: Federer's crying.

The first paragraph basically say that there are two goals that Fed should aim: the Calendar GS and Sampras's 14 GS titles. All those who wished to be present should he attain one or all of those goals should start collecting wood to build an ark for there may be flooding.

go_nadal
01-29-2006, 08:55 PM
I agree with wat most people have said in this thread:
Fed is a great champion, and to see that emotoion just come out was one of the most emotional things i have ever seen.
For those of you who said he was "childish" come on!
As a few people have said, it is alrite for someone to cry! especially after winning a GS final with one of the greatest players of all time there, Rod Laver.

hyperwarrior
01-29-2006, 09:17 PM
But honestly, the crying? Can't he keep control over himself for a little longer? I know everyone will bash me for that but I think he is not a little kid anymore...

Agree with the rest on rolemodel and all that, for those who need one.

I assume you would say the same thing to Sampras when he won his 13th Slams and during his retirement ceremony.

Deuce
01-30-2006, 12:42 AM
Life is all about those emotions. When I have a bad day, I curse everybody around me. When I am sad, I cry like a baby even when it ruins other's days. If I want to talk to somebody, I do it even if I am in a movie theater. Emotions are great. Knowing when to express them are even better. The whole world doesn't have to know what you are feeling just because you are feeling something. Children show their emotions at all times. As we mature, we learn to express them appropriately

No... as we 'mature', we learn to be more dishonest and insecure and phony - the result being to place a greater priority on appearing 'normal'. It is 'normal' in many cultures to be very phony. 'Normal' is, in essence, placing far more importance on how we appear than on how we truly feel. In other words, behaving in a manner which conflicts with our nature. To me, this is the definition of cowardice.

Children are the most wonderful, spontaneous, and honest humans on the planet. In this sense, to be called childish is indeed a high compliment.

Noelle
01-30-2006, 12:58 AM
Hm. Seven pages. :D I found it actually heartwarming that Federer cried (and cried like that--I would have gone up there and handed him tissues!). Come on, the guy who won two calendar Grand Slams is standing there giving you the trophy? Crying is perfectly respectable in that situation.

arosen
01-30-2006, 01:00 AM
One can only imagine what kind of pressure Roger has to endure as world's # 1 with all those commentators calling him the greatest and all that. Pressure builds up, it needs a release. I believe those tears are pure pressure being let out. Good for him, he'd have less gray hair and better health that way.

Yours!05
01-30-2006, 01:18 AM
I can't (re)find the article now but it was suggested here that Roger considered the Laver presentation as an indication that he was deemed fit to tread the same stage as the immortals, thus fulfilling one of his dreams. Went on to say he is now friends with Rosewall ( meets him at Roche's house) and considers this degree of acceptance to be a highpoint of his life. I have NOT explained this well. It was charming and quite heartwarming as recounted.
Then there's the story of Roger being too shy to speak to Laver a few years ago when they shared a shuttle bus. Very telling really. I wouldn't be too shy.

Since this seems to be the only active thread here's an interesting piece of OT info:
Federer's schedule on Finals Day, and after

4pm: Arrives at Melbourne Park to prepare for final
7.30pm: Takes to Rod Laver Arena for showdown with Marcos Baghdatis
10.40pm: C o u r t side victory speech (I asked TW to fix that:o)
11.15pm: Interviews with Channel 7 and Swiss-German TV
11.30pm: interviews with Swiss-German radio, Moma Sport, Radio Suisse, German radio, BBC radio and Australian radio
12.30am: post-match press conference in English, French and Swiss German
1.15am: television interviews with Swiss TV, Fox Sports, Japanese TV and ESPN
2.15am: one-on-one interview with International Herald Tribune and New York Times
8.30am: interview from hotel for Sunrise
8.45am: all-in with remaining TV stations seeking more footage
9.30am: photo shoot at Docklands, Melbourne.
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,17980787%255E23216,00.html

arosen
01-30-2006, 01:22 AM
Holy crap! Talk about BUSY!

Shabazza
01-30-2006, 03:18 AM
Holy crap! Talk about BUSY!
It's the life of a champion.

Klippy
01-30-2006, 03:41 AM
I actually think his childish crying is cute!

Warriorroger
01-30-2006, 04:19 AM
I actually think his childish crying is cute!

I think it's sexy, it made me a bisexual.

bb47
01-30-2006, 04:35 AM
I know everyone will bash me for that but I think he is not a little kid anymore...


Yes he is. A little kid with a raquet. That's why he is such a good player. Other guys grow up and start discovering life. Roger keeps discovering new tricks. That speech was very telling. I watched it three times and could not help LOL. Such a nice guy.

eagle
01-30-2006, 05:30 AM
There are a lot of pros and semi-pros who'd die to win even a single GS event ... even if it means crying. :)

And even if crying is considered bad, I think most folks would want to be in his shoes to win so many tourneys and Grand Slam events. :)

r,
eagle

pound cat
01-30-2006, 05:40 AM
I don't now why so many poeple think that crying is childish or silly. It's part of being human......you know, laugh, cry, happy, sad, etc,

Crying is fine...and the situations that make people cry are overwhelming to them at the time. That's what prompted Roger (and Baghdatis) to cry, and thta there were milions watching didn't matter.

Real men cry sometime.

bb47
01-30-2006, 05:44 AM
Actually I would have never adopted a child, since you can not stand a child crying, unless it is your own blood. But here, frankly is an exception. I would gladly adopt Roger.

bb47
01-30-2006, 05:49 AM
Real men cry sometime.

"I don't subscribe to the theory by which we only become truly adult when our parents die; we never become truly adults"
Michel Houellebecq

"and we never become Real men"
that's Me

pound cat
01-30-2006, 05:50 AM
Actually I would have never adopted a child, since you can not stand a child crying, unless it is your own blood. But here, frankly is an exception. I would gladly adopt Roger.

You would never be allowed to adopt any children with your views on children crying.

Roger wouldn't like to live at your house.

Warriorroger
01-30-2006, 05:52 AM
You would never be allowed to adopt any children with your views on children crying.

Roger wouldn't like to live at your house.

But he would like to live at mine, cause I am a great cook and I have the same name.

I.hEaRt.KeAbLe
01-30-2006, 05:52 AM
i never really liked Roger Federer until now.he has made me respect him much more.i loved the way he cried.i got so emotional that i cried also. so i was crying for marcos and for roger.you should have seen my tears.i was going crazy.anyway.i really like roger now and respect him a lot.he is a true legend.

bb47
01-30-2006, 05:55 AM
You would never be allowed to adopt any children with your views on children crying.

Roger wouldn't like to live at your house.


this is a good comment pound cat.

bb47
01-30-2006, 05:56 AM
i never really liked Roger Federer until now.he has made me respect him much more.i loved the way he cried.i got so emotional that i cried also. so i was crying for marcos and for roger.you should have seen my tears.i was going crazy.anyway.i really like roger now and respect him a lot.he is a true legend.


it's good you cried for them. But why SHOUTING now?

I.hEaRt.KeAbLe
01-30-2006, 06:00 AM
huh??what are you talking about.i wasnt screaming.sorry if i offended you.yes it is good i cried for them.it's good you cried for them. But why SHOUTING now?

bb47
01-30-2006, 06:04 AM
huh??what are you talking about.i wasnt screaming.sorry if i offended you.yes it is good i cried for them.

no worries, large bold letters are perceived as shouting on some forums, that's all.

@wright
01-30-2006, 07:01 AM
Life is all about those emotions. When I have a bad day, I curse everybody around me. When I am sad, I cry like a baby even when it ruins other's days. If I want to talk to somebody, I do it even if I am in a movie theater. Emotions are great. Knowing when to express them are even better. The whole world doesn't have to know what you are feeling just because you are feeling something. Children show their emotions at all times. As we mature, we learn to express them appropriately

Don't talk during a movie I'm in, or I'll feel the emotion of extreme anger and scream at you!

slice bh compliment
01-30-2006, 07:02 AM
But he would like to live at mine, cause I am a great cook and I have the same name.

Nice. :) This plus post number 108?
Ace and Gary, are you listening?

@wright
01-30-2006, 07:08 AM
Nice. :) This plus post number 108?
Ace and Gary, are you listening?
LOL

On a serious note, I can't believe anyone would say anything negative about a champion who loses it during a huge accomplishment. If you understand the total situation, it's not that hard to see why he was crying tears of relief. He had the highest odds for him for any grand slam tournament EVER. He was a HUGE favorite in the final. He had struggled in a couple matches previous to the final and was up against a guy who was swinging freely. All this put alot of pressure on him. Pressure weights some down, but drives others to perform. He even admitted he had thoughts during the match that he could possibly lose that final. When it was all over, he was simply ecstatic and relieved to have come through the champion. If you don't understand the crying, then you don't understand this. I haven't cried in years (even made it through my own wedding without shedding a tear!), but seeing him completely lose it in the ceremony really was touching to me. I didn't start crying, but it certainly tugged at my heart. It was a beautiful display of emotion from a great champion, a legend. He has many more things to accomplish, but he has done so much already.

Shabazza
01-30-2006, 07:12 AM
LOL

On a serious note, I can't believe anyone would say anything negative about a champion who loses it during a huge accomplishment. If you understand the total situation, it's not that hard to see why he was crying tears of relief. He had the highest odds for him for any grand slam tournament EVER. He was a HUGE favorite in the final. He had struggled in a couple matches previous to the final and was up against a guy who was swinging freely. All this put alot of pressure on him. Pressure weights some down, but drives others to perform. He even admitted he had thoughts during the match that he could possibly lose that final. When it was all over, he was simply ecstatic and relieved to have come through the champion. If you don't understand the crying, then you don't understand this. I haven't cried in years (even made it through my own wedding without shedding a tear!), but seeing him completely lose it in the ceremony really was touching to me. I didn't start crying, but it certainly tugged at my heart. It was a beautiful display of emotion from a great champion, a legend. He has many more things to accomplish, but he has done so much already.

Couldn't have said it better myself!

Warriorroger
01-30-2006, 08:00 AM
Nice. :) This plus post number 108?
Ace and Gary, are you listening?

:rolleyes: Are you taking the Mickey out of me?:rolleyes:

slice bh compliment
01-30-2006, 08:15 AM
:rolleyes: Are you taking the Mickey out of me?:rolleyes:

Yahah, taking the Mickey out of a Roger. Yeah, just ribbing you about your bisexual comment.;)
Take care man.

Warriorroger
01-30-2006, 10:17 AM
Yahah, taking the Mickey out of a Roger. Yeah, just ribbing you about your bisexual comment.;)
Take care man.

Well, I have to admit Federer has brough the Minny in me, I am not kidding. Take care as well.

AngeloDS
01-30-2006, 10:57 AM
When there's no emotion people complain, when there's emotion people complain. When there's a bad game people complain, when there's a good game people complain.

Too much complaining :\.

Anyways, Roger Federer shows us that playing Tennis (and winning) and the history of Tennis is something important to him. Winning something like that is overwhelming, both forgot to say hi to their girlfriends and such heh.

@wright
01-30-2006, 11:01 AM
Fed rarely acknowledges Mirka, the only time I remember him doing it was at the US Open last year (I think) when he wanted to thank "my lovely girlfriend, Mirka". He usually just thanks his "team".

Moose Malloy
01-30-2006, 11:16 AM
I like Fed, but I find this whole crying thing rather odd(the guy cried when he won his first masters series as well!). I understood it when he won his first Wimbledon. But then he did it again when he won his 2nd. Then his 3rd. And now this, he started crying 10 minutes after the match ended. And it wasn't like this was a hardfought match. He was the biggest favorite in AO history beating an unseeded player. He didn't break any kind of record with this win, it's not like he just won the French or a calendar slam. He didn't perserve through an injury, like Graf or Sampras did so many times. He wasn't playing for his one, last chance to win a slam like Ivanisevic.

I've seen many great champions win multiple majors over the years(Becker, Edberg, Sampras, Agassi, Lendl, etc) Never seen any of them sob uncontrollably the way Fed does. And Sampras only cried when he broke the alltime record. And also in that match with Courier, after his coach was diagnosed with a fatal brain tumor.

Still root for they guy, just feel embarassed for him. Roche & Mirka looked a little embarassed as well.

vicnan
01-30-2006, 11:29 AM
He is a true legend. But I still can't understand why his number one goal this year is to win Wimbledon instead of French Open. I mean he has won three Wimbledons already and zero French Opens. He must win French Open as fast as possible or else when he retires he will be known as another Pete Sampras and not as Roger Federer, the greatest ever.

Right, obviously that's the tournament he loves, but isn't the career grandslam bigger than yet any Wimbledon, esp. as it certifies your all around ability and puts you in a club that even Pete does not belong?

Virtuous
01-30-2006, 12:00 PM
Fed rarely acknowledges Mirka, the only time I remember him doing it was at the US Open last year (I think) when he wanted to thank "my lovely girlfriend, Mirka". He usually just thanks his "team".
True, that was @ the Cincy final btw

@wright
01-30-2006, 01:14 PM
Oh, you're right! I knew it was one of the recent finals that I have on tape! Thanks

alexmath2
01-30-2006, 03:50 PM
No... as we 'mature', we learn to be more dishonest and insecure and phony - the result being to place a greater priority on appearing 'normal'. It is 'normal' in many cultures to be very phony. 'Normal' is, in essence, placing far more importance on how we appear than on how we truly feel. In other words, behaving in a manner which conflicts with our nature. To me, this is the definition of cowardice.

Children are the most wonderful, spontaneous, and honest humans on the planet. In this sense, to be called childish is indeed a high compliment.

It's part of being sensitive to other people's feelings. I can cry, moan, and get angry over every perceived wrong. This does little good except make people around you feel uncomfortable. While admittedly Roger's bellyaching didn't make other people uncomfortable, it is part of a culture that puts one's own feelings above those around you. I can hate my boss, but I don't express that. Is that being 'phony?' People say keeping a stiff upper lip is a thing of the past. I say too bad. I really don't have a problem with expressing my emotions. I just choose to do it with family and friends. Part of life and being a grown up is knowing the right times to do things. Children have the luxury of being spontaneous, adults have a responsibility to behave appropriately.

Noelle
01-30-2006, 04:48 PM
I think, in that atmosphere, it was completely appropriate to shed tears of joy.

Free_Martha
01-30-2006, 04:56 PM
Federer's tears, like everything else about him, was calculated and practised.

Marius_Hancu
01-30-2006, 05:07 PM
I submit that Roger's tears were mostly for the passage of time and its fleetingness. For Peter Carter's (his former coach, an Australian) passing several years ago, and his family present there. For Laver's passage from youth and vigor to old age and ill health. For his own tenuous and temporary (if human) being at the apex where Laver once was.

Yours!05
01-30-2006, 06:40 PM
I submit that Roger's tears were mostly for the passage of time and its fleetingness. For Peter Carter's (his former coach, an Australian) passing several years ago, and his family present there. For Laver's passage from youth and vigor to old age and ill health. For his own tenuous and temporary (if human) being at the apex where Laver once was.Agree, Marius.

devila
01-30-2006, 07:14 PM
We're supposed to shield Roger from the devil, and mourn his short time as multiple slam winner. :confused: Cry me a river. :(

superman1
01-30-2006, 08:48 PM
Shut the *&#^ up devila. Why do you post anything?

This was a tough tournament for Federer which gave him some doubts and a lot of nerves towards the end. 7 Grand Slams really cements him in history. When he was put in the same vein as Sampras and Laver (3 slams in a row), I think it set in. He realized that the name "Federer" would be remembered like those names that he always admired. There are two ways to make the speech - be very casual and make a few jokes (Marat Safin), or let those emotions out.

Journeyman
01-30-2006, 08:56 PM
I don't know why he was crying. He could have asked anyone who knows anything about tennis and they could have told him that he was going to win. There was no real suprise when he won, especially since he ended up with Baghdatis in the final. Come on Roger, how could you have lost that one? If he lost, then he could have an excuse to cry.

devila
01-30-2006, 09:04 PM
Looks like a greedy, spoiled, unsatisfied little child. I'd rather watch Borg and Sampras than that hyperbolic, boring speech.

rlbjr
01-30-2006, 09:23 PM
Federer is an emotional guy. Used to let it out on court. He saw tape of himself playing Safin, both yelling, swearing, throwing rackets... and he decided never again. Didn't stop feeling, just packed it all up inside. GS's mean doing that for two solid weeks under the most intense self induced pressure. (Don't think for a moment he isn't trying to win the whole enchilada, the real GS). At the end, depending how much stress he felt, it's going to come out. He can't really control when or how. No one who feels it can. I think it just shows how much he is thinking about the history of the game and his place in it. Halfway to the record, in Rod Laver Arena with Rod there giving the trophy, Peter Carters family in attendance, you'd have to be pretty cold not to feel that.

Deuce
01-30-2006, 09:46 PM
It's part of being sensitive to other people's feelings. I can cry, moan, and get angry over every perceived wrong. This does little good except make people around you feel uncomfortable. While admittedly Roger's bellyaching didn't make other people uncomfortable, it is part of a culture that puts one's own feelings above those around you. I can hate my boss, but I don't express that. Is that being 'phony?' People say keeping a stiff upper lip is a thing of the past. I say too bad. I really don't have a problem with expressing my emotions. I just choose to do it with family and friends. Part of life and being a grown up is knowing the right times to do things. Children have the luxury of being spontaneous, adults have a responsibility to behave appropriately.
"Appropriate" according to whom? According to whose standards, or values, etc.?

Must we always check with each individual to discover what he or she deems "appropriate behavior" before we emote? Must we always check and see what is acceptable to each individual before we speak, or do anything at all? This is Political Correctness gone mad.

And yes, this certainly is phony.

I wouldn't know someone like you - because it's impossible to know how people like you feel. Your behavior is dependent entirely on the atmosphere in which you find yourself, and so it must change very often, and abruptly. You could literally be stoic and silent in one room, and crying your eyes out in the very next room. And laughing in the next room - all depending on how you think people in your immediate vicinity want you to behave, or on what you think they'll find 'acceptable'. Man - that's sad. This isn't being respectful to others, it is simply being afraid to be yourself.

If other people don't accept the honest displaying of real feeling - with sincere emotion - then the problem is entirely with the people who don't accept it, not with the person being honest. In other words, if you were disturbed by Federer's crying, it's entirely your problem, not his.

devila
01-30-2006, 10:14 PM
The Rome crowd booed Federer's poor attitude in the Costa match, he whined about how mean they were.
He has the right to express himself, but no one else can show disdain. Federer's incredibly unannoying. Almost a monk.

alexmath2
01-30-2006, 10:48 PM
"Appropriate" according to whom? According to whose standards, or values, etc.?

Must we always check with each individual to discover what he or she deems "appropriate behavior" before we emote? Must we always check and see what is acceptable to each individual before we speak, or do anything at all? This is Political Correctness gone mad.

And yes, this certainly is phony.

I wouldn't know someone like you - because it's impossible to know how people like you feel. Your behavior is dependent entirely on the atmosphere in which you find yourself, and so it must change very often, and abruptly. You could literally be stoic and silent in one room, and crying your eyes out in the very next room. And laughing in the next room - all depending on how you think people in your immediate vicinity want you to behave, or on what you think they'll find 'acceptable'. Man - that's sad. This isn't being respectful to others, it is simply being afraid to be yourself.

If other people don't accept the honest displaying of real feeling - with sincere emotion - then the problem is entirely with the people who don't accept it, not with the person being honest. In other words, if you were disturbed by Federer's crying, it's entirely your problem, not his.

I really hate getting into name calling on the internet. It feels so impersonal, but for you I'll make an exception.

As for not emoting like a child in public, being politically incorrect, I have to disagree.

Please spare me your armchair psychoanalysis. Boo-hoo, I am afraid to be myself. Waaahhh!!! As for you not knowing someone like me, that is probably true. I would never allow someone like you the chance to get to know me. I'll stick with my initial example. I don't express every thought or emotion at work. Doing so, would be selfish and potentially harmful to my career. My girlfriend asks me how she looks, should I be honest if she doesn't look right? I could hurt her feelings and be "true to myself" or I can be considerate. Some people are selfish and self-absorbed. Others act in a manner that is appropriate to the situation. I could be at a funeral and a joke pops in my head. Should I laugh if that's what I am feeling? Of course not, most people would say. Not Deucey. For him/her, expressing emotions is the end-all be-all. Laugh, cry, or do whatever you want, because one must always be true to oneself. Grow up. Part of being a member of society means conforming to some basic etiquette. If for you, that means you aren't being true to yourself, I feel sorry for you. I, on the other hand, feel as deeply as anybody, but choose to express my emotions in context appropriate situations. I don't think it makes the depth of my feelings any less intense. I can't recall Graf crying on the podium, although she might have, but that doesn't mean her joy was any less than someone who cries. It is people like you who discount her emotion and call her a robot.

Deuce
01-30-2006, 11:20 PM
I really hate getting into name calling on the internet. It feels so impersonal, but for you I'll make an exception.

As for not emoting like a child in public, being politically incorrect, I have to disagree.

Please spare me your armchair psychoanalysis. Boo-hoo, I am afraid to be myself. Waaahhh!!! As for you not knowing someone like me, that is probably true. I would never allow someone like you the chance to get to know me. I'll stick with my initial example. I don't express every thought or emotion at work. Doing so, would be selfish and potentially harmful to my career. My girlfriend asks me how she looks, should I be honest if she doesn't look right? I could hurt her feelings and be "true to myself" or I can be considerate. Some people are selfish and self-absorbed. Others act in a manner that is appropriate to the situation. I could be at a funeral and a joke pops in my head. Should I laugh if that's what I am feeling? Of course not, most people would say. Not Deucey. For him/her, expressing emotions is the end-all be-all. Laugh, cry, or do whatever you want, because one must always be true to oneself. Grow up. Part of being a member of society means conforming to some basic etiquette. If for you, that means you aren't being true to yourself, I feel sorry for you. I, on the other hand, feel as deeply as anybody, but choose to express my emotions in context appropriate situations. I don't think it makes the depth of my feelings any less intense. I can't recall Graf crying on the podium, although she might have, but that doesn't mean her joy was any less than someone who cries. It is people like you who discount her emotion and call her a robot.

Using such unrealistic and, essentially, stupid, examples as you use, I can understand why you are so frustrated.

It's not 'appropriate' to be a rude jackass on a tennis message board - but I see that you've overcome your fear of behaving 'inappropriately' - and, at least in this circumstance, had no fear of being said jackass. Nice to see that I've had such a positive effect on you already.

You're the one who said that Federer's behavior was 'inappropriate'. I'm simply telling you that if you can't handle such an honest display of emotion, then it is your perception which contains the defect, not his tears.

devila
01-31-2006, 12:50 AM
Federer's letters.
Looking back at all my achievements in 2004 a terrific sensation of joy still overcomes me. it was absolutely amazing to go soaring into such heights again after the low due to my injury in Basel. Not being able to defend my
Australiain Open this year and bringing an end to my long series of wins and wins against top 10 players was certainly painful.
The expectations prior to the Australian Open were huge and I must say that I am pleased with the result. It's more the fact of not having been 100% fit that bothers me. In any case, I've experienced once again how little it takes to decide on who is to leave the court as a winner on this level and especially at a Grand Slam.

Australian Open 2005. My first rd. opponent was Santoro. He's a very experienced player and I had a rather queasy feeling before the encounter. But, to my surprise, the match turned out to be a great start. The clear win over Agassi gave me further confidence for the further rounds.
Unfortunately the pain in my foot increased constantly, forcing me to evasive movements and eventually leading to strong tension in my back into the game in the last set.
Despite the handicap I had a matchball which I unfortunately was not able to convert. I fought with all my will and almost managed to turn back the tide after finding back into the game in the last set.
But Marat showed an excellent performance, deserving to take home the match and eventually the title.
It was certainly a tough moment for me. I had been in a similar situation against Haas in 2002. Furthermore, I lost the Davis Cup match against Hewitt in 2003 after leading by 2-0 sets and 5;3.
All of this didn't make it easier for me. As my last defeat goes back to the Olympics, I am now confronted with a rather unfamiliar situation.
I would like to add that I am pleased with myself because I gave it all I could.
The start of the Dubai tournament was rather hard for men (2005). Unfortunately, I don't exactly know why I only made it through the 1st 2 rounds with a lot of effort and I'm glad to have made it through them at all. Luckily, after these early troubles, I successfully made my way into the tournament and played some excellent tennis. The semifinal against Agassi was a highlight which still remains vibrant in my memory.
http://www.rogerfederer.com/data/downloads/en/newsletterfeb05_eng.pdf

I took a whole week's time to prepare for the French Open. It was great to train on Centre Court from Tuesday until Sunday. This allowed for an ideal adjustment to the local conditions.
Looking back I must say that I am satisfied with my overall performance in Paris. it is, after all, the best result I've shown in Roland Garros so far. but I must admit that I was a bit disappointed about the semifinal. it wasn't my best day and I found it difficult to deal with the conditions of light as it was slowly getting dark. Nadal showed a strong performance and his qualities as a fighter were convincing. I'm happy for Rafael that he went on to take the title. Being able to celebrate a Slam win at such a oung age is great. i knew the grass court season was up next and had something to look forward to; that made the defeat in Paris less of a disappointment.
Another Halle title figured on my account, so my hopes were high. At the beginning of the week before Wimbledon, the weather was rather unpleasant. I had to prepare indoors on carpet at first. Luckily the weather cleared up towards the middle of the week, allowing me to train on grass.
It was a particular feeling to play on the 1st day. After all, if you're the title holder, this is the only tournament where you already know about a year in advance when you'lll be playing. I was a bit tense and I knew that I had to be careful. Mathieu is a gifted player, making him a dangerous opponent on grass. Thus, I was relieved to start into the tournament well. I played a good match against Kiefer. i could've won the encouter in the 4rd set but I was happy to be able to finish it in 4 in the end.
Competing against Ferrero in the 2nd week was great. He had been the one Roddick and i chased in 2003 in pursuit of the title as world #1.
It was rather surprising to encounter Fernando Gonzalez in the quarterfinal; he is more comfortable on clay after all. With a solid performane on defense, I showed a good game of tennis against Fernando, moving another step towards the final. The fact of finding myself in the semi of a Slam the 5th time in a row really meant a lot to me.
The match against Hewitt was special. It was strange to meet the world's number 2 player in the semifinal. He was seeded as Wimbledon's #3 player and I would like to add that I support the system the way it is.
Naturally I am more than satisfied with the Hewitt match. The victory was my ticket to a very important final; my series of wins on grass as welll as my series of wins in the finals were at stake.
Being able to play so well against a strong competitor (Roddick) and under the enormous pressure was fantastic. I'm very proud of that sensational match I played and it was almost as if I was observing myself from high above, commenting: "There's that guy Fed in the final again, and he's winning it - again!" After the match point I was once again overwhemlmed by these immense emotions, just like after my first victory in Wimbledon 03. It is important and nice for me to know how moments like these can still mean so much. At first, I just wanted to lie down on the ground; the relief of all the pressure that had weighed on my shoulders, as well as the exhaustion, seized me completely. It seemed to me as if I lay there on grass forever; in reality, it had just been a couple of seconds. I had to beat the players who are the closest to me in the rankings. http://www.rogerfederer.com/data/downloads/en/newsletterjul05epdf.pdf

mucat
01-31-2006, 01:19 AM
I don't know why he was crying. He could have asked anyone who knows anything about tennis and they could have told him that he was going to win. There was no real suprise when he won, especially since he ended up with Baghdatis in the final. Come on Roger, how could you have lost that one? If he lost, then he could have an excuse to cry.

Tell that to Roddick, Ljubicic and Nalbandian. ;)

ErwinFromParis
01-31-2006, 03:38 AM
I like Fed, but I find this whole crying thing rather odd(the guy cried when he won his first masters series as well!). I understood it when he won his first Wimbledon. But then he did it again when he won his 2nd. Then his 3rd. And now this, he started crying 10 minutes after the match ended. And it wasn't like this was a hardfought match. He was the biggest favorite in AO history beating an unseeded player. He didn't break any kind of record with this win, it's not like he just won the French or a calendar slam. He didn't perserve through an injury, like Graf or Sampras did so many times. He wasn't playing for his one, last chance to win a slam like Ivanisevic.

I've seen many great champions win multiple majors over the years(Becker, Edberg, Sampras, Agassi, Lendl, etc) Never seen any of them sob uncontrollably the way Fed does. And Sampras only cried when he broke the alltime record. And also in that match with Courier, after his coach was diagnosed with a fatal brain tumor.

Still root for they guy, just feel embarassed for him. Roche & Mirka looked a little embarassed as well.

You forgot that he also cried when he beat Sampras at Wimledon 2002, And I think that's great because that means sensitive people can be stronger than other. I Think his tennis is sensitive. The fact FED is so sensitive it's directly related w/ his ability to improve his game. When he's playing tennis Roger first of all plays.

Kaptain Karl
01-31-2006, 11:08 AM
You folks who denigrate Federer's tears make me smile. Your scoffing attitude makes me wonder if you've had any "peak experiences" in your own lives.

The truth is, the vast majority of you don’t know HOW you’ll respond while ...
... *putting down your pet dog.
... *winning the State tennis tournament where you live.
... *marrying your sweetheart.
... *seeing a student apply what you’ve taught ... and won BIG.
... *learning you will be a parent.
... winning a National tournament.
... holding your newborn child in your arms.
... winning a major tennis tournament.
... *seeing your child excel in his/her endeavor of choice.
... winning a Slam event.
... giving your daughter away in marriage.
... winning a second Slam event.
... *losing a sibling (or close friend) to sudden death.
... winning a Slam event as defending champion.
... *losing a sibling to cancer.
... racking up a series of Slam victories.
... *assisting your parent to leave home for the last time, and enter Hospice to die.
... winning four Slams events consecutively.
... *delivering the eulogy at your parent’s funeral.
... winning the Grand Slam.

I’ve experienced those marked with an “*”. I’ve wept during some ... and not for others. Looking back, I can find no “rhyme or reason” for why I welled up for “X” and not for “Z”.

I’m betting you, who see yourselves as so “emotionally tough,” will surprise yourselves as you encounter these and other life experiences.

- KK

@wright
01-31-2006, 11:11 AM
Well said, kap'n.

devila
01-31-2006, 01:42 PM
Federer's supposed to teach us what we've already known?
Let's all worship his self-absorbed display, tennis fans and nonathletes everywhere.

AT LEAST you had long relationships with your parents. Some people are orphans because their fathers died during wartime and their mothers died at young ages. There are abused people who have trouble crying, yet they don't suffer less than poor Roger Rogi.
Drivel does come out of Federer fans' mouths too! Bow down to the minority of fans who've EXPERIENCED life's pains. :rolleyes:

If another player cries uncontrollably after rarely uttering a word before the final, we shouldn't react so strongly.
But, Federer should have his own double standards just because he won slams (as one of the most physically gifted athletes usually does).
Federer didin't suffer more pressure and pain than anyone here. He's hardly the
smartest, most ideal or most entertaining person. Just because he pleased the clingy fans, doesn't mean he's the most human player either

jgunnink
01-31-2006, 02:08 PM
I think Roger's emotion is tied to his artistic sensibility.

He's a maestro on the court, so like Mahler he cries when he finishes a symphony.

Warriorroger
01-31-2006, 02:47 PM
Thank you guys for all the great posts. Usually my threads gets bashed by the terrible threesome which names I dare not use.

Keifers
01-31-2006, 04:39 PM
This was a tough tournament for Federer which gave him some doubts and a lot of nerves towards the end. 7 Grand Slams really cements him in history. When he was put in the same vein as Sampras and Laver (3 slams in a row), I think it set in. He realized that the name "Federer" would be remembered like those names that he always admired. There are two ways to make the speech - be very casual and make a few jokes (Marat Safin), or let those emotions out.
Very thoughtful insight, superman1. Thanks.

Keifers
01-31-2006, 04:46 PM
Federer's supposed to teach us what we've already known?
Let's all worship his self-absorbed display, tennis fans and nonathletes everywhere.

AT LEAST you had long relationships with your parents. Some people are orphans because their fathers died during wartime and their mothers died at young ages. There are abused people who have trouble crying, yet they don't suffer less than poor Roger Rogi.
Drivel does come out of Federer fans' mouths too! Bow down to the minority of fans who've EXPERIENCED life's pains. :rolleyes:

If another player cries uncontrollably after rarely uttering a word before the final, we shouldn't react so strongly.
But, Federer should have his own double standards just because he won slams (as one of the most physically gifted athletes usually does).
Federer didin't suffer more pressure and pain than anyone here. He's hardly the
smartest, most ideal or most entertaining person. Just because he pleased the clingy fans, doesn't mean he's the most human player either
Serious question, devila. And sincere, too...

Where does the negative, almost bitter tone of your post come from?

Are you incensed by what you perceive to be a double standard for Federer? Are you thoroughly tired of the praise that's almost routinely heaped on Fed? Is it something else?

Again, I ask seriously and sincerely. Thanks.

Noelle
01-31-2006, 05:13 PM
I believe devila is the personal embodiment of all pro tennis fans' bitterness. :) (I think it might be a good thing to have some sort of escape valve like devila)

Kaptain Karl
01-31-2006, 05:52 PM
Noelle - What's with your lovefest with defila? defila is a sad bitter person.

- KK

Mikael
01-31-2006, 08:51 PM
I don't think anyone understands here. Who cares about 7 grand slams? Roger cried because Marcos had bet his girlfriend on the match! (and Marcos cried too when he realized he'd get Mirka).

Noelle
01-31-2006, 09:35 PM
Noelle - What's with your lovefest with defila? defila is a sad bitter person.

- KKI'm trying to promote harmony and FREE LOVE ON THE BOARD! :p Actually this place needs people to try to understand each other, even when coming from completely different viewpoints.

slice bh compliment
01-31-2006, 10:04 PM
Noelle - What's with your lovefest with defila? defila is a sad bitter person.

- KK

Yeah, but we need him. He is TW's finest devil's advocate. Without him, it's just too damn much positivity around here. ;) Kidding.

Devila never having existed would be like God never having created the devil. He is an actor. A minstrel. A very good one who never strays from character. His outlandishness reminds us of what is truth. Thank God for contrast. And healthy debate.

An line from a song comes to mind:
"Don't believe the devil, don't believe his book.
The truth is not the same without the lies he made up."
(from a song called "God, Part II" by U2)

K!ck5w3rvE
01-31-2006, 10:44 PM
Yes, this crying was a little bit childish.
But Roger is a great person nevertheless ....

He isn't childish, quite the opposite. During the AO, he met Laver for the first time ever, a man he idolised like no other. He said that he had travelled in a tournament transport car with him back from a match at the US Open to his accomodation in the past, but had never spoken to him. When asked why, he said: "I just had too much respect for him." He had too much respect for the man to even talk to him while they were in the same car! This meant a lot to him obviously, but maybe you wouldn't know what that means because you're a macho man who thinks anyone over the age of 12 who cries is childish.

Warriorroger
02-01-2006, 02:33 PM
He isn't childish, quite the opposite. During the AO, he met Laver for the first time ever, a man he idolised like no other. He said that he had travelled in a tournament transport car with him back from a match at the US Open to his accomodation in the past, but had never spoken to him. When asked why, he said: "I just had too much respect for him." He had too much respect for the man to even talk to him while they were in the same car! This meant a lot to him obviously, but maybe you wouldn't know what that means because you're a macho man who thinks anyone over the age of 12 who cries is childish.

I second that;)

pound cat
02-01-2006, 02:56 PM
Thank you guys for all the great posts. Usually my threads gets bashed by the terrible threesome which names I dare not use.



You may be feeling like Federer feels after winning a Slam....hey, I did well.....now you may cry... LOL

alexmath2
02-01-2006, 03:05 PM
Using such unrealistic and, essentially, stupid, examples as you use, I can understand why you are so frustrated.

It's not 'appropriate' to be a rude jackass on a tennis message board - but I see that you've overcome your fear of behaving 'inappropriately' - and, at least in this circumstance, had no fear of being said jackass. Nice to see that I've had such a positive effect on you already.

You're the one who said that Federer's behavior was 'inappropriate'. I'm simply telling you that if you can't handle such an honest display of emotion, then it is your perception which contains the defect, not his tears.

Wow, you lack even the most basic reading comprehension skills. I merely said it was a little weird. I am by no means frustrated. As for me being a rude jackass, I've done a cursory search of some of your previous posts. Talk about the pot calling the kettle black As far as I can tell, the bulk of your day is spent harassing some teenage girl about what a superficial person she is in the great Deucey's eyes. Aparently, berating a teenager is the emotionally mature thing to do. It mut be nice to have all that time to do it. Probably unemployed and living with mommy. My example isn't stupid, but your response certainly is. You are right about one thing and only one thing. You have a brought me down to your sophomoric level, and I will no longer respond to such childishness.

slice bh compliment
02-01-2006, 03:05 PM
Thank you guys for all the great posts. Usually my threads gets bashed by the terrible threesome which names I dare not use.

Aw man, tell us! Or are going to make us weed through pages and pages of threads to figure out this "terrible threesome".
The triumverate of thrash?
The trio with brio?
The trifecta that'll infectya?

Warriorroger
02-01-2006, 03:23 PM
Aw man, tell us! Or are going to make us weed through pages and pages of threads to figure out this "terrible threesome".
The triumverate of thrash?
The trio with brio?
The trifecta that'll infectya?

Okay, but don't give them my whereabouts, I am scared to death of those three.

I'll give you hints: Angelina Jolie2x, an Argentine, ooops I hear them coming, oh no

Warriorroger
02-01-2006, 03:24 PM
You may be feeling like Federer feels after winning a Slam....hey, I did well.....now you may cry... LOL

I like to feel Federer somewhere, he made me a bisexual.

pound cat
02-01-2006, 03:50 PM
I like to feel Federer somewhere, he made me a bisexual.

We know! you said it twice before. LOL As Canadians say, good stuff, eh!

Warriorroger
02-01-2006, 03:58 PM
We know! you said it twice before. LOL As Canadians say, good stuff, eh!

But you don't seem to get what he has done to me.

slice bh compliment
02-01-2006, 04:07 PM
But you don't seem to get what he has done to me.

WarriorRoger watches AusOpen men's final trophy presentation on the television alone in his bedroom earrrrly one Sunday morning in Holland.

After playing a superb match, a sweaty, musky Federer embraces an absolutely fabulous and brilliant older gentleman (twice). Shows great, deep, manly emotion as he holds a massive silver phallic symbol.

WarriorRoger moans, "Oh, Roger Federer, you're doing it to me again."

[It's okay, Warrior, we get it.:o]

WarriorRoger bemoans the fact that he must go through Mirka to get to Federer.
Sighs. Cues up Morrissey on his iPod.

Warriorroger
02-01-2006, 04:21 PM
WarriorRoger watches AusOpen men's final trophy presentation on the television alone in his bedroom earrrrly one Sunday morning in Holland.

After playing a superb match, a sweaty, musky Federer embraces an absolutely fabulous and brilliant older gentleman (twice). Shows great, deep, manly emotion as he holds a massive silver phallic symbol.

WarriorRoger moans, "Oh, Roger Federer, you're doing it to me again."

[It's okay, Warrior, we get it.:o]

WarriorRoger bemoans the fact that he must go through Mirka to get to Federer.
Sighs. Cues up Morrissey on his iPod.

You are no dummy that's for sure. I have to admit that I was alone that Sunday morning. I think Mirka is his beard. Oh and I like musky, LOL. I like you slice backhand:p

Docalex007
02-01-2006, 04:29 PM
Was ist hier los? Kann ich bitte ruhe haben? Federer kann weinen...ich habe kein problem. Fick euch alle. :rolleyes:

Stein um Stein, Mauer ich dich ein.

The **** is bananas - B A N A N A S

Yours!05
02-01-2006, 04:33 PM
You are no dummy that's for sure. I have to admit that I was alone that Sunday morning. I think Mirka is his beard. Oh and I like musky, LOL. I like you slice backhand:pslice to serve:D

slice bh compliment
02-01-2006, 04:41 PM
slice to serve:D

hahahah. Oooof. You got me. I read it and just could. not. respond. Such a flirt, that little Dutch warrior!
Yes, I was wordless. List-less, if you will. And I will....go search for ways to restore my hetero-cred.

Take care, fellas.
Thanks for the humor.
Sighs. Cues up Morrissey. kidding.

Peace.

Virtuous
02-01-2006, 06:32 PM
I like to feel Federer somewhere, he made me a bisexual.
erm...are you 'warriorroger' from mtf?

opiate
02-01-2006, 09:04 PM
While I may be stoned to death in trying to ressurect a thread going downwards...

Borrowed from the Footie section of Guardian Unlimited. A quick lesson on how to plan ahead when attending final matches (especially when a pack of Kleenex is concerned). And the Sun has dubbed our very own "Roger Bluberer"

http://football.guardian.co.uk/Columnists/Column/0,,1700097,00.html

To cry or not? Federer blubs...

Bear with me on this one, as the logic behind the comparison isn't immediately apparent, but watching Roger Federer struggle with tears as he celebrated his Australian Open win, I was reminded of The Big Lebowski.

Not the Jeff Lebowski/Dude character in that most excellent of movies, but the wheelchair-bound millionaire Lebowski, whose sharing the same surname with the Dude provides the mistaken identity that sets the film's plot in motion. Specifically, I was put in mind of the moment when the Dude is taken to see the big Lebowski in the east wing of his Bel Air mansion, where he is in seclusion following the apparent kidnap of his highly nubile young wife Bunny.

"Are you surprised by my tears?" he demands of his guest.

"F***in' A," replies the Dude hoarsely, on account of the drag from a joint having just hit the back of his throat.

"Strong men also cry," comes the painfully choked response. "Strong . . . men . . . also . . . cry."

Well, of course they do. Indeed, as the mighty Federer lost the battle with his bottom lip last Sunday, it occurred to me that in the way that people divert themselves by dividing the world into two groups - cavaliers or roundheads, gentlemen or players, and so on - it is entirely possible to split the sporting world into criers and non-criers.

And Federer's a crier. Not that there's anything wrong with that, to quote Jerry Seinfeld. Indeed, it will be entirely down to the traditional poor execution on my part if what follows appears to suggest that there's something wrong with being a sporting blubber. On the contrary, no uniform moral judgment is implied in branding anyone a crier, or otherwise. Criers can be heroes or villains, charismatic or achingly tiresome, in just the same way that non-criers can.

The next crucial thing about the carve-up is that it is based on psychological truth. You don't have to have seen them in Gazzatian floods to brand them a blubber. Indeed, they may never be filmed crying in victory, defeat, anything, in their entire sporting career. But in your heart, you know. (Incidentally, as with most delightful yet pointless exercises, this is a pastime pleasingly spiced by the taking of drink).

Stevie G? Crier. Lampard? Non-crier. Paul Ince? Crier. Even at this elementary stage you should be able to handle Roy Keane without assistance. Most don't require more than a nanosecond of debate, though occasionally you'll get a momentary puzzler - Michael Vaughan, for instance (crier) - but really you have to go swiftly and on instinct. Call from the gut.

So, a few snooker players to ease us in gently. Ronnie: crier. Ditto Jimmy White. Hendry, Davis, Parrott: not criers. Golf-wise, off the top of my head, you've got Monty (classic crier), along with Woosie and Fred Couples, in counterpoint to Vijay Singh and Tiger (if he's ever cried it doesn't count). Rowing is a sport of blubbers, apart from Steve Redgrave, of course, with rugby union a close second. Those in search of stiff upper lips are directed towards league.

Of particular interest are sporting siblings, where scientific pub debate suggests one or other will have custody of the tear ducts, but not both. Steve Waugh's not a crier; Mark Waugh is. Michael Schumacher weeps with the best of them, but Ralf's lachrymal glands are positively Saharan. The Williams sisters? It's Venus who packs the Kleenex.

Then, of course, there are those who should be criers but aren't. Shane Warne. Boris Becker. Above all, Beckham. As for the England captain's current national coach . . . clearly, Sven doesn't have tear ducts. Elsewhere, Big Sam doesn't carry a tissue in his cuff, and I hardly need tell you in which camp Stuart Pearce sits. He is joined by Mick McCarthy and Glenda Hoddle, among many others, though David O'Leary never cries for anyone. Not even watching Schindler's List. And if you find yourself dithering over Keegan in the manner of Louis Walsh wondering which of his two X Factor acts to put through into the next round, as though it were Sophie's bleeding Choice . . . well, it's the old "if you have to ask, you'll never know" thing.

We end by taking things to an advanced level. If you have truly mastered this essential sporting dichotomy, you may test yourself on two Match of the Day pundits, Lineker being too obvious a dry-eye to bother with. The queenly Lawrenson is not a crier. But the peerless Hansen? Oh, yes. Great big blubby tears . . .

Deuce
02-01-2006, 09:29 PM
Wow, you lack even the most basic reading comprehension skills. I merely said it was a little weird. I am by no means frustrated. As for me being a rude jackass, I've done a cursory search of some of your previous posts. Talk about the pot calling the kettle black As far as I can tell, the bulk of your day is spent harassing some teenage girl about what a superficial person she is in the great Deucey's eyes. Aparently, berating a teenager is the emotionally mature thing to do. It mut be nice to have all that time to do it. Probably unemployed and living with mommy. My example isn't stupid, but your response certainly is. You are right about one thing and only one thing. You have a brought me down to your sophomoric level, and I will no longer respond to such childishness.

If you read posts that I wrote to Meg, you obviously went back quite a few weeks (or months) in your rather desperate search for 'bad things I can use against Deuce'. Hope you had fun, at least, with your time.

You may have set a record - revealing your ill character within fewer than 10 initial posts.

opiate
02-01-2006, 09:54 PM
Devila, Free_Martha, this article is for you. Seems like the Bloomberg columnist shares your sentiment:

http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000039&refer=columnist_soshnick&sid=az2C.FZL7ceg

Federer Fandango
The question is whether the homeless will be pushed out along with the fancy TV when the game is over.

The effort to remake reality is so pervasive it's hard to know what's genuine.

The duality of the persona of tennis ace Roger Federer was on full display this past weekend.

Eighteen months ago the seven-time Grand Slam champion wore his hair in a ponytail. His apparel of choice was a sweat suit, while his four-person management team included his mother and his girlfriend.

The 24-year-old Federer last year hired International Management Group, the same firm that represents golfer Tiger Woods. Since then Federer's hair has gotten progressively shorter and he's shown an affinity for Prada suits.

Which Federer is the real one? Sadly, the extreme makeover calls into question the tears he shed after winning the Australian Open on Jan. 29. Was Federer really overcome with emotion or did some marketing whiz at IMG suggest a few tears might play well on TV?

The Aussie Open celebration rekindles the memory of a scene in the movie ``Broadcast News,'' where the reporter played by William Hurt fakes a good cry after someone suggests that it might make for a more compelling interview.

kbg
02-01-2006, 10:03 PM
That Bloomberg article sounds pretty stupid. Federer's been blubbering after Slam wins even before he signed with IMG. (Wimbledon '03-'04, anyone?) In fact the whole "James Bond with a racket" image he's going for was pretty much shattered with all the blubbering he did.

Noelle
02-01-2006, 10:40 PM
Federer cut his hair BEFORE hiring IMG. :roll:

Keifers
02-01-2006, 11:14 PM
What an inane, fatuous piece that Bloomberg article is. Can men be catty and b*tchy when they talk or write about (successful) other men? Well, sure they can... The Green-Eyed Monster shows up in both genders.

But, when a "man" does it, it does look and feel particularly pathetic, doesn't it? I doubt the writer will ever rise to within, say, a few million (?) ranking places of the top of his profession.

Warriorroger
02-02-2006, 12:39 AM
erm...are you 'warriorroger' from mtf?

What is mtf?

Docalex007
02-02-2006, 06:01 AM
What is mtf?

Men's Tennis Forum

Warriorroger
02-02-2006, 07:41 AM
How can I not bi

Kaptain Karl
02-02-2006, 08:05 AM
What an inane, fatuous piece that Bloomberg article is. Can men be catty and b*tchy when they talk or write about (successful) other men? Well, sure they can... The Green-Eyed Monster shows up in both genders.

But, when a "man" does it, it does look and feel particularly pathetic, doesn't it?Bingo!

By the time I finished that piece I was wondering why I wasted those minutes....

- KK